Table 1 - uploaded by Sandra G Solaiman
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Top countries in goat population ____________________________________________

Top countries in goat population ____________________________________________

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... of the goats in the world are produced in Asia, followed by Africa. The top three producers of goats are China, India and Pakistan, all located in Asia (Table 1). Although Australia and New Zealand are two major exporters of goats, they are not major producers of goats. ...
Context 2
... is notable that during the same period the number of Angora goat farms declined with over a 63% decrease in the Angora goat population. The number of farms selling Angora goats declined with over 61% fewer goats sold (Table 9) and farms selling mohair declined more than 36% with over 54% less mohair sold (Table 10). The number of Angora goats declined another 11% from 2002 to 2006 as indicated by sample data. ...
Context 3
... number of U.S. dairy goat farms increased by 45% and dairy goat numbers increased by 52% from1997 to 2002. The number of farms selling them increased by 71%; the number of goats sold increased 57% (Table 11). According to the 2006 USDA-NASS sample data, dairy goats gained another 10% in numbers from the 2002 USDA-Census. ...
Context 4
... to the 2006 USDA-NASS sample data, dairy goats gained another 10% in numbers from the 2002 USDA-Census. The number of meat goat farms increased by 18%, and the number of meat goats increased more than 57% from 1997 to 2002 (Table 12). The number of farms selling meat goats increased by 48% with an 108% increase in meat goats. ...
Context 5
... numbers increased 10% annually from 1985 to 2006. More than 82% of goats in the United States are meat goats, 10% are dairy goats and 8% are fiber goats ( Figure 5, Table 13). Most of the goats in the United States are produced in the South (Texas) and the Southeast (Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Florida and Alabama), the Midwest (Oklahoma, Missouri) and the West (California). ...
Context 6
... number of goats in the state of Texas is 1.3 million, up 9% from the 2002 USDA Census. More than 70% of the total goat population in the United States is produced in the top ten states in goat numbers (Table 14). Many states experienced an increase in the goat numbers from the 2002 USDA Census. ...
Context 7
... than 75% of meat goats are produced by the top ten states in number of meat goats. According to USDA-NASS sample data, Texas leads the nation with over 1 million meat goats and 45% of meat goat population, followed by Tennessee (Table 15). With a 63% increase in meat goat population, California surpassed Oklahoma, Georgia and Kentucky and claimed 3 rd place. ...
Context 8
... with an 183% increase in meat goat numbers ranked 8 th , and Florida with an 180% increase made the top 10 list as the 9 th producer of meat goats in the nation. More than 57% of dairy goats are produced in the top ten states in number of dairy goats (Table 16). Most of the dairy goat producing states are located in the Midwest (Wisconsin, Iowa, Ohio, Michigan and Indiana), the Northeast (New York, Pennsylvania, and New England), and the South (Texas). ...
Context 9
... the state of Missouri showed an increase in the number of meat goats, the number of dairy goats declined in this state as well as in the state of Ohio. More than 75% of the fiber goats are produced in the state of Texas, and almost 90% are produced in the top 8 states in the number of fiber goats (Table 17). Most of the fiber goats are produced in the South (Texas), the Southwest (Arizona, New Mexico) and the West (California, Oregon), with little production in the Midwest (Nebraska, Missouri, Minnesota). ...
Context 10
... average goat herd size in the United States is highest for fiber goats followed by meat and then dairy goats (Table 18). Fiber goats are mainly concentrated in large herds and in the hot and dry climates of the South and the Southwest. ...
Context 11
... 2006, the United States imported more than 11,000 MT (nearly 25 million pounds) of goat meat valued at $41.8 million, up 131% from 8,462 MT in 2003; its total value was up 194% from $21.5 million in 2003. However, goat meat imports in 2006 were up 329% from 3,360 MT in 1999; its total value was up 535% from $7,850 million in 1999 (Table 19). The main exporters of goat meat to the United States are Australia and New Zealand with 92.5% of the contribution coming from Australia. ...
Context 12
... 20. U.S. live goats and goat meat export (MT) _______________________________________________________________________ 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 _______________________________________________________________________ Live goats 26,081 29,579 3,775 3,976 ...
Context 13
... number of all goats slaughtered at the state and federally-inspected plants in 2006 were nearly 750,000, up 2.5 folds from 1990. Meat goat slaughter numbers have shown a solid increase since 1990 (Table 21 and Figure 9), and they likely will continue to increase due to trends in population growth that promote meat goat production. The meat goat industry in general is in its infancy; therefore, many on- farm slaughters are probably not reported. ...
Context 14
... category will include more than 90% of farms in the United States. Almost 80% of the U.S. farms are very small with cash value sales of less than $50,000 (Table 31). Thus, the majority of U.S. farms are appropriate for goat production and can benefit from diversity of farm products and value-added through introduction of goats into the farming. ...

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... They are also well known for their meat and milk. They produce high-quality meat and milk by converting feeds and forages into these products (Solaiman, 2007). The goat industry is one of the fastest growing industries among the livestock industries in the US. ...
Research
Legumes can be beneficial in increasing pasture productivity and goat performance. This study's objective was to evaluate the impact of legume-grass pastures on goat performance. A 50:50 mixture of hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) and Marshall ryegrass (Lolium L.) or hairy vetch and rye (Secale L.) was sown on 50% of the research area and 50% with Marshall ryegrass or rye. Forage samples were collected and processed for dry matter. Yearling Kiko does (19) were divided into two groups: legume-grass mix (10 does) and grass only (9 does), both rotationally stocked in their respective plots. Animal live weight, FAMACHA score, and body condition score were collected at the beginning, fortnightly, and at the end of the study. The goat group on legume-grass pasture gained more weight (67 ± 0.9 lb.) than the group on the grass pasture (65 ± 0.9 lb.) (p<0.05). Results indicated that legume-grass pastures promote the performance of growing does compared to sole-grass pastures.
... They are also well known for their meat and milk. They produce high-quality meat and milk by converting feeds and forages into these products (Solaiman, 2007). The goat industry is one of the fastest growing industries among the livestock industries in the US. ...
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Legumes can be beneficial in increasing pasture productivity and goat performance. This study’s objective was to evaluate the impact of legume-grass pastures on goat performance. A 50:50 mixture of hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) and Marshall ryegrass (Lolium L.) or hairy vetch and rye (Secale L.) was sown on 50% of the research area and 50% with Marshall ryegrass or rye. Forage samples were collected and processed for dry matter. Yearling Kiko does (19) were divided into two groups: legume-grass mix (10 does) and grass only (9 does), both rotationally stocked in their respective plots. Animal live weight, FAMACHA score, and body condition score were collected at the beginning, fortnightly, and at the end of the study. The goat group on legume-grass pasture gained more weight (67 ± 0.9 lb.) than the group on the grass pasture (65 ± 0.9 lb.) (p<0.05). Results indicated that legume-grass pastures promote the performance of growing does compared to sole-grass pastures.
... They are also well known for their meat and milk. They produce high-quality meat and milk by converting feeds and forages into these products (Solaiman, 2007). The goat industry is one of the fastest growing industries among the livestock industries in the US. ...
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... Their domestication history can be traced long back to 8000 BC, raised for milk, meat, or fiber (Boyazoglu et al., 2005). Increasing ethnic and faith-based populations accustomed to eating goat meat is making meat goat popular in the U.S. (Solaiman, 2007). The expansion of the meat goat industry in the Southern US is also due to producers switching from tobacco to meat goat production in response to financial settlements resulting from class action lawsuits against the US tobacco industry (Spencer, 2008). ...
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