Figure 2 - available via license: CC BY 4.0
Timeline of hair follicle regeneration in the WIHN model. (A) Hair neogenesis in mice occurs in large excisional wounds equal to, or larger than, 1 × 1 cm. (B) The wound epithelializes and granulation tissue forms during early PWD0−14. (C) De novo hair placodes start to form around PWD14 and continue until approximately PWD19. (D) Newly formed HFs achieve full differentiation over the next 14−15 days (until approximately PWD33−34). (E), (F) Following a transient telogen phase (PWD35), de novo follicles reenter second anagen at around PWD45. Similar to normal HFs in the unwounded skin, de novo follicles in the wound center contain bulge stem cells and can cycle repetitively.

Timeline of hair follicle regeneration in the WIHN model. (A) Hair neogenesis in mice occurs in large excisional wounds equal to, or larger than, 1 × 1 cm. (B) The wound epithelializes and granulation tissue forms during early PWD0−14. (C) De novo hair placodes start to form around PWD14 and continue until approximately PWD19. (D) Newly formed HFs achieve full differentiation over the next 14−15 days (until approximately PWD33−34). (E), (F) Following a transient telogen phase (PWD35), de novo follicles reenter second anagen at around PWD45. Similar to normal HFs in the unwounded skin, de novo follicles in the wound center contain bulge stem cells and can cycle repetitively.

Source publication
Injury types and regenerative responses by adult HFs. HFs can efficiently regenerate following micro-injury, as well as partial and complete amputation. (A), (B) Micro-injury of bulge stem cells...
Timeline of hair follicle regeneration in the WIHN model. (A) Hair neogenesis in mice occurs in large excisional wounds equal to, or larger than, 1 × 1 cm. (B) The wound epithelializes and...
Key features of regenerated excisional skin wounds. (A) Typically, de novo HFs occupy the center of the regenerated wound (neogenesis zone, green). The neogenesis zone is always separated from the...
Distribution and orientation of neogenic hairs in regenerated wounds. (A) Commonly, regenerated HFs form one large cluster (also see ). One or a few small secondary cluster(s) can also be present....
Context 1
... 2 months, wounds 1.5 cm in diame- ter are recommended for more efficient WIHN. Early post- wounding events in the WIHN model are typical of all ex- cisional wounds and include reepithelialization over newly formed granulation tissue. These processes culminate in full reepithelialization and scab detachment on post-wounding day 13−14 (PWD13−14) (Fig. 2). This time point, also re- ferred to as scab detachment day 0 (SD0) ( Fan et al. 2011), coincides with the onset of HF neogenesis. Placodes of the first de novo follicles appear on day SD1 and continue to emerge asynchronously over the course of the following week, until the process plateaus at around PWD21. Indeed, as exemplified in ...
View
Context 2
... de novo HFs contain functional bulge stem cells and undergo repetitive hair growth cycles, similar to normal HFs ( Ito et al. 2007). Typically, de novo follicles enter first telogen at around PWD35 (albeit asynchronously due to their asynchronous morphogenesis), and then enter second anagen at around PWD45 (Fig. 2). Orientation is another important aspect of neogenic hairs. While normal hairs in the mouse dorsum follow the same cranial−caudal orientation ( Guo et al. 2004), the axial position of neogenic hairs varies significantly. Although sometimes they appear to lack any specific orientation ( Figs 3B and 4D, purple sub- domain), they often ...
View

Citations

Ad you may be interested in