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Time trends of DDS-PM 10 for Cyprus urban station. (Dashed lines represent the 95% confidence intervals for the estimate, and marks on x-axis represent the end of the year).

Time trends of DDS-PM 10 for Cyprus urban station. (Dashed lines represent the 95% confidence intervals for the estimate, and marks on x-axis represent the end of the year).

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The characteristics of desert dust storms (DDS) have been shown to change in response to climate change and land use. There is limited information on the frequency and intensity of DDS over the last decade at a regional scale in the Eastern Mediterranean. An algorithm based on daily ground measurements (PM10, particulate matter ≤10 μm), satellite p...

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... dust PM 10 annual average measured at the urban and rural station in the area of Nicosia, showed a statistically significant decrease (PM 10 urban: sen's slope = −1.7, p-value = 0.08, PM 10 rural: sen's slope = −2.2, p-value = 0.02), but for the urban site, the decrease was not monotonic (Fig. 9). The decrease was observed during the spring season at both sites (PM 10 urban: sen's slope = −3.5, p-value = 0.004; PM 10 rural: sen's slope = −2.6, p-value = 0.03) (Fig. ...

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