Table 1 - uploaded by Iman Khajehzadeh
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Time spent in different space categories as a percentage of 24 hours and in hours and minutes

Time spent in different space categories as a percentage of 24 hours and in hours and minutes

Source publication
Conference Paper
Full-text available
From 1974 to 2011 the average new New Zealand house almost doubled in size while occupancy reduced over the same period. A first study indicates the features of large houses include several bathrooms, double/triple garaging, extra bedrooms/living areas and specialized rooms although there is no study of how these extra spaces are used. As a part of...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... each house has a different combination of rooms, it is difficult to compare time usages. For this reason, spaces within a house were put into 12 categories (Table 1). For all households, bedrooms with nightly use were considered usual bedrooms and other bedrooms as extras. ...
Context 2
... differences came from time spent out of home and usual/extra living areas. Table 1 presents average time spent in each space category and the households which were included in each average (only households with at least one room in each space category are included in that particular average). As seen in Table 1, for an average household, the majority of time at home (76%) is spent in usual bedrooms and usual living areas. ...
Context 3
... 1 presents average time spent in each space category and the households which were included in each average (only households with at least one room in each space category are included in that particular average). As seen in Table 1, for an average household, the majority of time at home (76%) is spent in usual bedrooms and usual living areas. To compare time usage in different space categories in small and large houses, Figure 3 was created to represent an average for all small and large houses. ...

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... Living room, bedroom, kitchen, and dining room are the most attended spaces within homes. This result echoes previous work that using traditional methods reported that living rooms and bedrooms are the most used places in small and large homes by occupants [43], and extends this previous finding by showing that for the specific case of young people on weekend nights, kitchens and dining rooms are also frequently used indoor spaces. As mentioned previously, a few videos avoid capturing directly the physical spaces by turning the camera to the ceiling and floor. ...
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Private nightlife environments of young people are likely characterized by their physical attributes, particular ambiance, and activities, but relatively little is known about it from social media studies. For instance, recent work has documented ambiance and physical characteristics of homes using pictures from Airbnb, but questions remain on whether this kind of curated data reliably represents everyday life situations. To describe the physical and ambiance features of homes of youth using manual annotations and machine-extracted features, we used a unique dataset of 301 crowdsourced videos of home environments recorded in-situ by young people on weekend nights. Agreement among five independent annotators was high for most studied variables. Results of the annotation task revealed various patterns of youth home spaces, such as the type of room attended (e.g., living room and bedroom), the number and gender of friends present, and the type of ongoing activities (e.g., watching TV alone; or drinking, chatting and eating in the presence of others.) Then, object and scene visual features of places, extracted via deep learning, were found to correlate with ambiances, while sound features did not. Finally, the results of a regression task for inferring ambiances from those features showed that six of the ambiance categories can be inferred with R 2 in the [0.21, 0.69] range. Our work is novel with regard to the type of data (crowdsourced videos of real homes of young people) and the analytical design (combined use of manual annotation and deep learning to identify relevant cues), and contributes to the understanding of home environments represented through digital media.
... Based on house layout, a time-use diary was prepared for each person to report the time he/she spent in each room as well as "out of home" for 14 consecutive days in winter. A full description of this study and the results are presented elsewhere (Khajehzadeh and Vale, 2015b). ...
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... Based on house layout, a time-use diary was prepared for each person to report the time he/she spent in each room, garden/deck (if available) and "out of home" for 14 consecutive days in winter. A full description of this study and the results are presented elsewhere (Khajehzadeh and Vale, 2015a). ...
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... Building consent figures from Statistics NZ (2014a) also show that the average floor area of new houses in New Zealand has almost doubled from 1974 (108.7m 2 ) to 2011 (191.6m 2 ). Preliminary studies undertaken as part of this research show that one feature of these larger houses are their double and triple garages, along extra bedrooms, extra living rooms, multiple bathrooms, and specialized rooms, such as a designated study (Khajehzadeh and Vale, 2015a). These studies also found New Zealand houses had carports and hard-standings for parking, usually coupled with the opportunity to park in the road (Khajehzadeh and Vale, 2015a). ...
... Preliminary studies undertaken as part of this research show that one feature of these larger houses are their double and triple garages, along extra bedrooms, extra living rooms, multiple bathrooms, and specialized rooms, such as a designated study (Khajehzadeh and Vale, 2015a). These studies also found New Zealand houses had carports and hard-standings for parking, usually coupled with the opportunity to park in the road (Khajehzadeh and Vale, 2015a). This all suggests the presence of unused parking facilities in many New Zealand houses. ...
... This study shows that on average garages of NZ houses are vacant for 14.4 hours/day. The results of our pilot study for this project (Khajehzadeh and Vale, 2015a) indicate that a ...