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The value of fish production in APEC economies in 2006 with the imputed estimate of damage from marine debris (FAO 2007; Takehama 1990). 

The value of fish production in APEC economies in 2006 with the imputed estimate of damage from marine debris (FAO 2007; Takehama 1990). 

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