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The structure of multiple residential microgrids [40].

The structure of multiple residential microgrids [40].

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The deployment of solar photovoltaics (PV) and electric vehicles (EVs) is continuously increasing during urban energy transition. With the increasing deployment of energy storage, the development of the energy sharing concept and the associated advanced controls, the conventional solar mobility model (i.e., solar-to-vehicles (S2V), using solar ener...

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... addition, the energy losses may be large due to the long transmission distance from the buildings to the shared ESS. Zhang et al., also developed a novel structure for promoting solar mobility in residential buildings, as shown in Figure 5 [40]. In their study, each residential building has a microgrid, which connects the electricity production facilities (e.g., PV panels) and electricity consumption devices (e.g., lighting, washing machine, EVs, etc.). ...

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