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The schematic of the ultrasonic cleaner.

The schematic of the ultrasonic cleaner.

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With the rapid development of the photovoltaic industry, the global installation of photovoltaic modules has increased significantly. However, there are few reports on the recycling of photovoltaic modules' backsheets. In this study, we employed customized ultrasonic instrument and compound solvents to recover backsheets from crystalline silicon PV...

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... ultrasonic cleaner (CH-12M, Weineng, China) was used in this research, its schematic illustration is shown in Figure 3. The power of ultrasonic cleaner is 720W (adjustable), the frequency is 28Khz, and the heating power is 1000W; 12 transducers are installed at the bottom. ...

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Citations

... Pablo Dias et al separated a waste of silicon-based PV modules using an electrostatic separator after mechanical milling [8]. Chuang Xu et al, employed in their study a customized ultrasonic instrument and compound solvents to recover backsheets from crystalline silicon PV modules [28]. Sanna-Mari Nevala et al, present in their study, for the first time a comparative analysis on the use of EHF technique and conventional crushing for the processing of PV solar panel waste [29]. ...
Article
The rapid deployment of solar photovoltaic (PV) technology around the world brings the ineluctable problem of disposing of and recycling decommissioned solar photovoltaic modules. Recycling will become an essential sector in the value chain of the PV industry. This paper reviews the progress in silicon photovoltaic module recycling processes, from lab-scale and pilot-scale research in order to compare mechanisms, ascertain feasible approaches, recycling yields, equipment, costs, and improvement areas for different recycling processes. Trends, gaps, and outlooks are drawn to guide future R&D. Recycling processes have evolved from mass recovery to value recovery and now full recovery. Selective delamination and automated material sorting are key enablers of high recycling yield. So far, most recycling research focuses on recovering materials, however, it is equally important to explore secondary markets and end-use applications of recovered materials, especially for glass, and polymers. To implement sustainable end-of-life recycling at a large scale, technological feasibility, economic viability, and social desirability need to be addressed altogether by innovative recycling technologies.