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| The proportion of species detected by only eDNA (bottom, dark gray), eDNA and conventional surveys (middle, black), and only conventional surveys (top, light gray), ordered by total observed species richness for (A) single-marker and (B) multi-marker observations. Labels on the x-axis indicate the study from which the data were sourced -the alphabetical label is a unique observation within a study, and the preceding number indicates total species richness associated with an observation. Asterisks (*) indicate marine and estuarine observations. A cross-referenced table of values can be found in Supplementary File S7.

| The proportion of species detected by only eDNA (bottom, dark gray), eDNA and conventional surveys (middle, black), and only conventional surveys (top, light gray), ordered by total observed species richness for (A) single-marker and (B) multi-marker observations. Labels on the x-axis indicate the study from which the data were sourced -the alphabetical label is a unique observation within a study, and the preceding number indicates total species richness associated with an observation. Asterisks (*) indicate marine and estuarine observations. A cross-referenced table of values can be found in Supplementary File S7.

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The ability to properly identify species present in a landscape is foundational to ecology and essential for natural resource management and conservation. However, many species are often unaccounted for due to ineffective direct capture and visual surveys, especially in aquatic environments. Environmental DNA metabarcoding is an approach that overc...

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Context 1
... surveys and eDNA metabarcoding exhibited a high degree of overlap when accounting for shared species detections within study sites (Figure 4). For most sites (65%), the proportion of shared detections was 0.50 or greater (specifically, average overlap was 0.56 ± 0.02, n = 115). ...
Context 2
... proportion of shared detections in multi-marker studies (0.63 ± 0.04, n = 37) was also higher than in single-marker studies (0.53 ± 0.03, n = 78). Interestingly, the proportion of eDNA-only detections was higher in marine systems (0.31 ± 0.06) than in freshwater systems (0.19 ± 0.02), and it was higher in multi-marker studies (Figure 4A; 0.27 ± 0.03) than in single-marker studies (Figure 4B; 0.18 ± 0.02). , black), and only conventional surveys (top, light gray), ordered by total observed species richness for (A) single-marker and (B) multi-marker observations. ...
Context 3
... proportion of shared detections in multi-marker studies (0.63 ± 0.04, n = 37) was also higher than in single-marker studies (0.53 ± 0.03, n = 78). Interestingly, the proportion of eDNA-only detections was higher in marine systems (0.31 ± 0.06) than in freshwater systems (0.19 ± 0.02), and it was higher in multi-marker studies (Figure 4A; 0.27 ± 0.03) than in single-marker studies (Figure 4B; 0.18 ± 0.02). , black), and only conventional surveys (top, light gray), ordered by total observed species richness for (A) single-marker and (B) multi-marker observations. ...

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