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The platform layout of the Masjid al-Aqsa.  

The platform layout of the Masjid al-Aqsa.  

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The Dome of the Rock is one of the earliest existing monuments in Islam and was erected during the Umayyad period. It was unique among the concurrent monuments of Islamic architecture, either by its location over the famous rock of Jerusalem, or by its octagonal form unfamiliar within Islamic culture. How did these two factors get incorporated to p...

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The stability of vertical cuts in rocky strata, associated with the provision of the transportation infrastructure through a mountainous terrain, is always a challenge for the geotechnical engineers. The problem becomes further complex if the cuts are parallel or near parallel to the bedding planes. Such a scenario results in all sorts of slope ins...

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... This view has not been seen as historically acceptable, since pilgrims from Syria continued to make pilgrimage during the Umayyad period, and Caliph Abd al-Malik bin Marwan who built the Dome of the Rock, also visited Makkah for the pilgrimage. 30 This disregarded view was presented in the text as a view shared and accepted by the Muslim world. ...
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U.S. President Donald Trump declared his long-awaited and debated Middle East ‘peace plan,’ the so-called ‘deal of the century,’ in January 2020, standing alongside Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. He promised to keep Jerusalem as Israel's undivided and united capital with recognition of Israeli sovereignty over the West Bank. With regards to al-Aqsa Mosque, the plan puts forth the Zionist prospect and point of view, while undermining the Islamic importance of the area. It reduces the area of al-Aqsa Mosque to one single building of the Mosque’s compound and in practical terms, it intends that the whole area of al-Aqsa Mosque (al-Haram al-Sharif) be transformed to allow open access for prayer for visitors of all faiths and thus to end Muslim control over the site of one of Islam’s holiest mosques. The plan would, in practice, lead to three main changes that would undo the centuries-old status quo completely: the transfer of the site to Israeli sovereignty, the repealing of Jordan's apparent custodianship over it, and the expiry of the ban on non-Muslim prayer. This, in turn, would give Israel full control over the site of al-Aqsa Mosque compound, something it could not achieve during the 1967 occupation of the city. Such changes would not only mean that Muslims lose further access to their mosque, but would also allow people of other faiths, particularly Jews, to share the site with Muslims in preparation for a full Jewish monopoly over the site and the building of a Jewish temple on its site.
... The Dome of the Rock was designed and built during the caliphate of Abd al-Malik, the 5th Umayyad caliph of Islam (685-705 AD), and its construction was completed in 692 AD under the supervision of Raja ibn Haywa and Yazid ibn Sallam who are thought to have been in financial and administrative control [10]. The building is octagonal with a wooden dome with a diameter of 20.44 m. ...
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The developments of technology in realizing contemporary designs become a hot issue for the development of the mosque’s appearance and shape. The development of the shell building in the mosque which is quite attractive to the public was the construction of the Cologne Central Mosque in Germany in 2017. For the point of view that shape of the building is a new era in the use of shell structures in the mosque. The shell structure commonly used as a dome of the mosque that is used as a symbol of the mosque buildings in general use and continues to this day which began from the era of the caliphate. This paper will present a review of the structural designs and building materials on the shell structure of the mosque which has been developing from time to time. And can be used as a possible new reference in the future developments of mosque architecture.
... (i) The fear that Muslims would be influenced by previously built structures: Geographer Makdisi says: Goitein, 1950: 104;İslam and Al-Hamad, 2007: 111). ...
... The cultural practices in the early years were similar to the actions of the Prophet. The archaic form of the Medina mosque has been imitated in cities such as Kûfe, Basra and Vasıt ( Rabbat, 1989: 12;Humpreys, 1991;İslam and Al-Hamad, 2007: 109). Where in the world of the first 60 years these similar and repeated forms, the exchange of one of the sides of the subject brings about the change of other things as well: In this process, people, or here in this context Arabs also changed. ...
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... The second stage (306-636) when liberated by the Muslim Arabs, Christian was able to 1 Creswell, 1924Creswell, , p.20. 1929 1969, p.65. Ali, 1946. Goitein, 1950. Crinson, 1996, pl.1. Slavik, 2001, p.60. Davidson, and Gitlitz, 2002. Islam, & Al-Hamad, Zaid, 2007, p.139, 2, 109–128. Stark, 2009, p.33. Avner, 2010, pp.43-44. Écochard, 1936, 79-84, figs.10-12, no.12. In Arabic: Al-Maqdidi, 1909, pp. 165-171. Strang, 1970, pp.126-169). It begun in 684 AD, Kuilman, 2011, Fig.248 p.313. Curatola, 1981-1983. 2 Creswell, 1924. Ali, 1946. Goitein, 1950. Slavik, 2001. Davidson, Linda, and Gitlitz, 2002. ...
... Octagonal Planning is found in European cities during the Roman age, including that found in Italy, in the city of Viroffic Vengda "Vitruvius", and planning fortifies angles eight cylindrical towers (Fig. 2Creswell, 1924Creswell, , p.20. 1929 1969, p.65. Ali, 1946. Goitein, 1950. Slavik, 2001. Davidson, and Gitlitz 2002. Avner, 2010. Islam & Al-Hamad, 2007, 1, p.139, 2, pp.109–128. Stark, 2009, p.33. Avner, 2010, pp.43-44. Écochard, 1936, 79-84, figs.10-12, no.12, In Arabic: Al-Maqdidi, 1909, pp.165-171. Strang, 1970, pp.126-169. 2 Gilbert, M. 1985, p.220. 3 Ousterhout, 1989, p.407. 4 Procopius, (6th century), 1971, VII, pp.345-349. 5 In Arabic: Al-Tabari, 1967, 3. pp.609. Al-Maqdisi, 190 ...
... The second stage (306-636) when liberated by the Muslim Arabs, Christian was able to 1 Creswell, 1924Creswell, , p.20. 1929 1969, p.65. Ali, 1946. Goitein, 1950. Crinson, 1996, pl.1. Slavik, 2001, p.60. Davidson, and Gitlitz, 2002. Islam, & Al-Hamad, Zaid, 2007, p.139, 2, 109–128. Stark, 2009, p.33. Avner, 2010, pp.43-44. Écochard, 1936, 79-84, figs.10-12, no.12. In Arabic: Al-Maqdidi, 1909, pp. 165-171. Strang, 1970, pp.126-169). It begun in 684 AD, Kuilman, 2011, Fig.248 p.313. Curatola, 1981-1983. 2 Creswell, 1924. Ali, 1946. Goitein, 1950. Slavik, 2001. Davidson, Linda, and Gitlitz, 2002. ...
... Octagonal Planning is found in European cities during the Roman age, including that found in Italy, in the city of Viroffic Vengda "Vitruvius", and planning fortifies angles eight cylindrical towers (Fig. 2Creswell, 1924Creswell, , p.20. 1929 1969, p.65. Ali, 1946. Goitein, 1950. Slavik, 2001. Davidson, and Gitlitz 2002. Avner, 2010. Islam & Al-Hamad, 2007, 1, p.139, 2, pp.109–128. Stark, 2009, p.33. Avner, 2010, pp.43-44. Écochard, 1936, 79-84, figs.10-12, no.12, In Arabic: Al-Maqdidi, 1909, pp.165-171. Strang, 1970, pp.126-169. 2 Gilbert, M. 1985, p.220. 3 Ousterhout, 1989, p.407. 4 Procopius, (6th century), 1971, VII, pp.345-349. 5 In Arabic: Al-Tabari, 1967, 3. pp.609. Al-Maqdisi, 190 ...
... Goitein, Ali, 1946 . (Creswell, 1924& Al-Hamad, Zaid, 2007. Stark, 2009. ...
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