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The mean survival of N. davidi reared at 20, 23 and 26ºC. Kruskal-Wallis One Way Analysis of Variance and Tukey All Pairwise Multiple Comparison procedure. Vertical bars indicate standard error of the mean. Significant difference at 20ºC (**P <0.01). 

The mean survival of N. davidi reared at 20, 23 and 26ºC. Kruskal-Wallis One Way Analysis of Variance and Tukey All Pairwise Multiple Comparison procedure. Vertical bars indicate standard error of the mean. Significant difference at 20ºC (**P <0.01). 

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An invasive freshwater shrimp, Red Cherry Shrimp (Decapoda: Caridea: Atyidae), is naturally distributed in fresh water habitats of Asia. This forage species has an important role in aquatic ecosystems by transferring planktonic production into higher trophic levels mainly including fish and aquatic animals. However, temperature strongly affects sex...

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... Thirdly, non-native decapods exhibited variable responses to climate change, with most species (29 out of 32 studied species, some species repeated across multiple publications) significantly affected by climate change. Nearly half of the studied non-native species were also projected to experience decreased habitat suitability, population abundance survival and fecundity in their introduced ranges (see Olsson et al., 2010;Capinha et al., 2012Capinha et al., , 2013Gallardo & Aldridge, 2013;Hansen et al., 2013;Serezli et al., 2017;Préau et al., 2019), cautioning against the generalisation of non-native decapods benefitting from climate change. ...
Article
Freshwater decapod crustaceans, with representatives from four main taxonomic groups (Anomura, Astacidea, Brachyura, Caridea), form a large and prominent functional group distributed globally across all types of freshwater habitats. Freshwater decapods play critical ecological roles in aquatic communities and ecosystems, and at the same time have widespread cultural and economic significance. A large proportion of freshwater decapods are imperilled by threats including pollution, habitat loss, invasive species, and importantly, climate change. Direct impacts of climate change, as well as its synergistic effects with other threats, pose a substantial but potentially understudied and possibly even underestimated risk to the conservation of freshwater decapod crustaceans. We assessed patterns of climate change impacts on freshwater decapods, as well as the extent of related research, at a global scale. Based on a comprehensive literature survey of all years up to November 2019, we found that only 49 publications, starting from the first relevant article in 2003, contained empirical evidence of climate change effects on freshwater decapods, with a total of 145 native and 11 non-native freshwater decapod species studied in relation to climate change. Climate-change research has also been increasing for all four groups, but more than half of the literature included the freshwater crayfishes Astacidea. We also found a strong bias towards the Australasian region in climate-change research in freshwater decapods, while no published studies were recorded in the Oceania biogeographic region. Importantly, almost three-quarters of native freshwater decapod species studied were projected/reported to be significantly affected by climate change, while more than 90% of the non-native freshwater decapod species studied were projected/reported to be significantly affected by climate change. Considering the severe impacts demonstrated for several species, and coupled with the notable taxonomic and geographic gaps in research into the rest of the freshwater decapods, there is an urgent need for greater representation in climate-change research across species and in regions of high diversity (such as the Neotropical, Afrotropical, and Indomalayan regions), in order for conservation interventions and measures to be beneficial to the most threatened groups.
... However, the sex ratio in both shrimps species was similarly skewed toward females. Temperature severely affects the sex ratio in N. davidi, with females being more prevalent at lower temperatures (80% at 20°C) and males at higher temperatures (Serezli et al. 2017). The water temperature of Békás Pond fluctuates over time, with the lowest temperature being 21.9°C near its outlet (Weiperth et al. 2019). ...
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The present contribution is the first record of ornamental freshwater shrimp Caridina babaulti from European open waters and the first evidence of introduction outside its native range. Among 120 non-native freshwater shrimps collected in Miskolctapolca, Hungary, seven individuals (5.8%) were identified as C. babaulti and included one ovigerous female, while the others (94.2%) were Neocaridina davidi. Morphological analysis and the Standard DNA Barcoding Procedure confirmed the taxonomic identification of the two species. The presence of C. babaulti in Miskolctapolca is most likely due to intentional or unintentional releases by aquarium owners. The low number of captured individuals and this species' absence in a previous survey suggest that the shrimp is of recent introduction. C. babaulti and the well-established N. davidi have similar environmental tolerance; hence, this species might potentially form a viable population if not removed.
... Temperature is also known as the most important environmental, sex determining factor for aquatic species [18]. Some studies show that water temperature can affect the sex ratio of some fish species, as in tilapia [19][20][21], guppy [22], medaka [23], and european sea bass [24], and of some crustaceans namely Porcellionides pruinosus (Isopod) [25], Tigriopus californicus (Copepod) [26], and Neocaridina davidi (Caridea) [18]. ...
... Temperature is also known as the most important environmental, sex determining factor for aquatic species [18]. Some studies show that water temperature can affect the sex ratio of some fish species, as in tilapia [19][20][21], guppy [22], medaka [23], and european sea bass [24], and of some crustaceans namely Porcellionides pruinosus (Isopod) [25], Tigriopus californicus (Copepod) [26], and Neocaridina davidi (Caridea) [18]. Knowledge of the extent to which temperature affects sex ratios is relevant to gauge potential threats of rising temperature on fish populations [27]. ...
... Male ratio was higher at low temperature treatment (24 • C) than for the other temperature treatments (p < 0.05), which indicated a possibility of water temperature having an affect on sex ratio in mud crab, such as has been commonly reported in teleostei fish [19][20][21][22][23][24], and also in some crustaceans [18,25,26]. Interestingly, male ratio produced in this study was higher at low temperature (24 • C), whereas in teleostei fish, high temperature of ≥28 • C and aboveusually produces higher male ratio [19][20][21]. ...
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This study was carried out to determine the physiological changes (survival, growth, molting cycle, sex differentiation, and gill condition) of mud crab, Scylla paramamosain crablet at different water temperatures of 24, 28 and 32 °C, and ambient temperature of 27 to 30 °C. Thermoregulatory behavior, represented by preferred temperature (29.83 ± SD 2.47 °C), critical thermal minimum (17.33 ± SD 0.58 °C), critical thermal maximum (40 ± SD 0.00 °C), and thermal tolerance interval (22.67 ± SD 0.58 °C), were checked for Crablet 1 stage only (with ambient temperature as acclimation temperature).Both low (24 °C) and high (32 °C) temperatures were associated with lower growth performance, and survival rate (p < 0.05), in comparison with both 28 °C and ambient temperature treatments.Male ratio at low temperaturetreatment (24 °C) was higher (80.09 ± SD 18.86%) than for other treatments (p < 0.05), observed as 44.81 ± D 10.50%, 41.94 ± SD 19.44%, and 76.30 ± SD 5.13% for 28 °C, 32 °C and ambient temperature treatments, respectively. However, there was no significant difference observed between 24 °C, 28 °C, and ambient temperature treatments. Anatomical alterations of gill lamellae of S. paramamosain crablet for both 32 °C, and 24 °C treatments, appeared thinner and paler than at both 28 °C, and ambient temperature treatments. Based on this study, temperature of 28 to 30 °C was recommended as the optimal temperature for the long-term nursery phase of S. paramamosain.
... For the vast majority of aquatic species (including crustaceans), sex determination is a secondary process (sex is determined after a considerable time period post hatching) (Abucay et al., 1999;Kato et al., 2011;Darnell et al., 2013). For aquatic crustaceans, sex is usually determined 45-90 days after hatching with the duration species-specific but also depends on some environmental variables including temperature, salinity and nutrition (Huang and Chou, 2015;Serezli et al., 2017;Levy et al., 2019). But the internal biological processes (including changes in expression of candidate gene/s, physiological and biochemical alterations) for sex determination can be initiated several days to weeks beforehand, depending on species (Rigaud et al., 1997;Kato et al., 2011;Tropea et al., 2015;Loughland and Seebacher, 2020). ...
... However, there is also sex specific sensitivity to temperature fluctuation; males are sensitive (cause higher rates of mortality) to high temperatures in some species while females show this tendency for other species (Rigaud et al., 1997;Kato et al., 2011;Darnell et al., 2013;Mat et al., 2017;Serezli et al., 2017). Testing the effect of temperature only on sex ratios can be counter-productive in this regard; instead, an integrative approach (physiological traits including growth, metabolism and developmental duration, coupled with changes in expression of thermal stress response and sex determining genes) would be reliable. ...
... Relatively higher growth performance, the highest survivability rate (64 %) and almost equivalent proportion of sex ratios were obtained (51 % male and 49 % female) at the control temperature (28℃) indicating an optimum condition for the P. monodon larvae. At optimum temperature organisms show better growth performance, higher survivability and equal proportions of sex ratios (Serezli et al., 2017;Acquafredda et al., 2019). In tropical environments, aquatic species inhabit at temperature ranges very close to their maximum thermal tolerance limit (Val et al., 2006). ...
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Temperature is an important abiotic factor influencing growth, development, metabolic performance and sex determination of aquatic organisms. The present study was conducted to test the effect of six different temperature levels (24℃, 26℃, 28℃ as control, 30℃, 32℃ and 34℃) on the physiological (growth, developmental durations, survivability, sex ratios and O 2 consumption) and genetic (changes in expression pattern of seven candidate genes: three male sex determining genes, three female sex determining genes and a single thermal stress response gene) aspects of black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) larvae. Temperature treatments significantly altered the growth performance of shrimp individuals (P < 0.05) with the highest growth performance obtained at 32℃, moderate levels were obtained at 28− 30℃ and the lowest levels were obtained at the remaining temperatures. Temperature treatments significantly shortened the larval developmental durations at 28℃, 30℃ and 32℃ (required 44-46 days for sex differentiation) while 52-63 days were required at 24℃, 26℃ and 34℃. Temperature treatments also altered sex ratios of experimental P. monodon individuals; significantly higher (P < 0.05) proportions of males (coupled with higher expression levels of male sex determining genes) were obtained at lower temperatures (24℃ and 26℃) while larger proportions of females (with higher expression levels of female sex determining genes) were obtained at higher temperature levels (30℃, 32℃ and 34℃). The thermal stress response gene, heat shock protein (HSP70) showed constant expression levels at 28℃ but higher expression levels were obtained at other temperatures. Results imply that higher temperature can significantly increase the expression of female sex determining genes to produce larger proportions of females in P. monodon that in turn can help to improve aquaculture production.
... The last temperature value was established as the control treatment, being an adequate temperature for its culture based on . The lowest temperature levels were determined according to previous researches, which demonstrated the high tolerance of N.davidi to a wide range of water temperatures (Klotz, Miesen, Hüllen, & Herder, 2013;Serezli, Atalar, Hamzacebi, Kurtoglu, & Yandi, 2017). ...
Article
This study analysed the effects of three temperatures (20, 24 and 28ºC) on survival, body coloration, carotenoid content, body weight, biochemical composition and spermatophore quality in the shrimp Neocaridina davidi. In all treatments, survival was >90%. Female body coloration and total carotenoid content, for both males and females, did not statistically differ among treatments. Female weight was similar for the three temperatures, while male weight was higher at 20ºC and 24ºC. Total lipid content was higher in female and male shrimps raised at 20ºC. Total protein content was higher in females exposed at 28ºC, but in contrast, males showed the lowest value at the same temperature. The histological and histochemical analyses of the male reproductive system did not reveal differences among treatments. At 20ºC, a delay in ovaries maturation was observed, as well as a smaller amount of ovigerous females at the end of the experimental period. Hence, these results suggest that a temperature range from 20ºC to 28ºC is adequate for satisfactory growth, with no change being exerted on spermatophore quality, body female coloration or carotenoid content, but biochemical composition was affected. Nevertheless, the lowest temperature had a clear impact on the metabolism and reproduction of N. davidi.
... Mizue and Iwamoto (1961) briefly reported on a successful overwintering of this shrimp in Japanese freshwaters; however, neither water temperature nor other environmental conditions were specified in the publication; Oh et al. (2003) found this shrimp successfully reproducing and overwintering in one Korean temperate stream, and our data support this finding. Moreover, Serezli et al. (2017) suggested that lower water temperature (below 23°C) causes a female-biased sex ratio in the population, which is crucial for population viability. ...
... On the other hand, we found the red cherry shrimp also occurs in non-thermal streams. Hence, even if the red cherry shrimp is generally perceived as an invasive species (Serezli et al., 2017), our findings potentially raise the predicted invasiveness of this species, which was assessed as a medium-risk in previously analyzed markets trading in ornamental decapods (Uderbayev et al., 2017;Weiperth et al., 2018). Although we have no data about any symbionts attached on the carapace surface of captured shrimps, the potential introduction of bdelloid rotifers, stalked protozoans, and scutariellid temnocephalidans previously found on shrimps imported from Indonesia (Patoka et al., 2016a) cannot be excluded, and the probability of these symbionts establishing new populations via shrimp introductions is unknown. ...
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The international pet trade has caused numerous introductions of non-native species globally. This is true also for freshwater decapod crustaceans including the red cherry shrimp. This tiny creature has been previously found in thermally-polluted waters in Europe (Germany and Poland). Here we present its first occurrence in Hungary and in the entire Carpathian Basin. The species was sampled once per month over one year, from November 2017 to November 2018 in a natural thermal pond (spa) and also in an adjoining non-thermal brook in Miskolctapolca, Hungary. Shrimps were preyed upon by adult fishes in the locality but many individuals, including ovigerous females and juveniles, were recorded within the survey continuously. The density of shrimps was positively correlated with the water temperature, despite some individuals being found in the non-thermal stream and also in winter. We consider that the population of this species in Hungary is now well-established and self-sustaining.
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Temperature increases can often speed up embryonic development and shorten gestation times in viviparous and ectothermic vertebrates. Viviparity is rare among invertebrates, however, and it is unclear what effects modest rises in temperature have on viviparous animals with exoskeletons. The intertidal marine isopod Cirolana harfordi in Australia is a species whose female members incubate their young inside their thorax and give birth to live young. This mode of reproduction contrasts the typical oviparous reproductive mode of most isopods. We investigated the impacts of increased temperature on the length of pregnancy and the number of offspring produced by C. harfordi individuals. Populations of C. harfordi were maintained at control (18 °C, to represent average environment temperature at the start of the breeding season) and two increased temperature treatments (20 °C and 22 °C). Increased temperature reduced development time to the juvenile stage and increased the number of young produced. It appears that the reproductive physiology of this viviparous invertebrate is affected by modest changes in temperature.