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The mean rates ± SD for all classifications. All classifications were significantly different following training. The hit rate and FA rate significantly increased. The miss rate and CR rate significantly decreased following training; p ≤ 0.001. Pre-training d'= 1.632; post-training d' = 1.364. The average reaction time, defined as the time between the presentation of an image and user response, for both pre-training and post-training sessions is shown in Table 1. The average reaction times (RT) decreased significantly for the hit [T(39)=6.66, p<.001], miss [T(36)=10.47, p<.001], and CR [T(38)=5.39, p<.001] classifications, but not the FA. The interaction effect between training and classification was analyzed via ANOVA, and was not significant, F(3,7)=2.74, p>0.05.

The mean rates ± SD for all classifications. All classifications were significantly different following training. The hit rate and FA rate significantly increased. The miss rate and CR rate significantly decreased following training; p ≤ 0.001. Pre-training d'= 1.632; post-training d' = 1.364. The average reaction time, defined as the time between the presentation of an image and user response, for both pre-training and post-training sessions is shown in Table 1. The average reaction times (RT) decreased significantly for the hit [T(39)=6.66, p<.001], miss [T(36)=10.47, p<.001], and CR [T(38)=5.39, p<.001] classifications, but not the FA. The interaction effect between training and classification was analyzed via ANOVA, and was not significant, F(3,7)=2.74, p>0.05.

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