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The map illustrates three years with different climatic conditions of Humboldt squid catches and fishers’ prices registered by fishery reporting office. The markers’ size represents catch volumes (tons); colors indicate ranges of fishers’ pricesin Mexican pesos (MXN) per ton. Santa Rosalìa and Guaymas constitute the core fishing centers

The map illustrates three years with different climatic conditions of Humboldt squid catches and fishers’ prices registered by fishery reporting office. The markers’ size represents catch volumes (tons); colors indicate ranges of fishers’ pricesin Mexican pesos (MXN) per ton. Santa Rosalìa and Guaymas constitute the core fishing centers

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Small-scale fisheries are critically important for livelihoods around the world, particularly in tropical regions. However, climate variability and anthropogenic climate change may seriously impact small-scale fisheries by altering the abundance and distribution of target species. Social relationships between fishery users, such as fish traders, ca...

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... During anomalously warm years, squid catch volume declines but value increases as the resource becomes scarcer (Elsler et al., 2021). For most fishers, this means catching proportionally less squid and diversifying to other species. ...
... Importantly, social processes can also influence how fishers respond to resource scarcity. For instance, in areas of high cooperation between fish buyers, fishers may receive less value for their squid catch as buyers collude to fix prices (Elsler et al., 2021). Depending on existing cooperative or competitive relationships with buyers, fishers may respond differently to squid shortages by ei-ther focusing on scarce but valuable squid or diversifying effort into other fisheries. ...
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Small-scale fisheries (SSFs) around the world are increasingly facing pressures from a range of environmental, economic, and social sources. To sustain SSFs, it is imperative to understand how fishing communities adapt to these pressures. In particular, to manage economic risks fishers often catch many different species; diversifying harvest portfolios creates multiple income sources in case one species becomes less abundant, less valuable, or otherwise unavailable. Here, we apply fisheries connectivity network analysis to assess the portfolios and potential adaptive capacity of small-scale fishing communities in the Baja California Peninsula (BCP), Mexico. We found that network metrics like modularity and density varied by region and through time. The Pacific coast region of Baja California displayed increasingly modular fisheries connectivity networks, indicating fisheries landings became increasingly asynchronous with each other and the potential adaptive capacity increased. The remaining three regions of Baja California showed the opposite trend, where the temporal covariance between fisheries increased over time. Overall, this study shows that the potential adaptive capacity of fishing communities varies substantially throughout the BCP, and highlights how fisheries connectivity networks can offer a way to quantify and advance our understanding of adaptive capacity within small-scale fishing communities.
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Seafood is one of the most internationally-traded food commodities. International markets can provide higher revenues that benefit small-scale fishing communities but can also drive a decline in fished populations. Collective action in collective organizations such as fishing cooperatives is thought to enhance the sustainability of fished populations. However, our knowledge of how collective action enables fishing cooperatives to achieve positive social-ecological outcomes is dispersed across case studies. Here, we present a quantitative, national-level analysis exploring the relationship between different levels of collective action and social-ecological outcomes. We found that strong collective action in Mexican lobster cooperatives was related to both sustaining their fisheries and benefiting from international trade. In the 15-year study period, lobster cooperatives that demonstrate characteristics associated with strong collective action captured benefits from trade through high catch volumes and revenue. Despite lower (but stable) average prices, the biomass of their lobster populations was not compromised to reap these benefits. Individual case studies previously found that fishing cooperatives can support both positive social and ecological outcomes in small-scale fisheries. Our results confirm these findings at a national level and highlight the importance of strong collective action. Thus, our work contributes to a better understanding of the governance arrangements to promote fishing communities' welfare and benefits from international trade and, therefore, will be invaluable to advancing small-scale fisheries governance.