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The light spectrum of high-pressure sodium (HPS) and plasma lights.  

The light spectrum of high-pressure sodium (HPS) and plasma lights.  

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Different light spectra trigger different plant growth processes. Therefore, the optimum light spectrum for various plant growth processes such as leaf and fruit growth may be different. Greenhouse mini-cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is a tall crop, with most leaf growth occurring in the top and middle canopy while fruit growth occurs in the middle...

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... the ambient light was getting stronger in March 2015, there was no difference in the leaf temperature between the HPS and plasma. According to the wavelength of overhead lights, the light intensity of plasma ranged evenly from 500 to 600 nm wavelength, whereas the light intensity of HPS mostly peaked around 560 to 590 nm and 815 nm wavelength (Figure 2). Due to 815 nm wavelength light considered as infrared or heat radiation, it may cause the higher leaf temperature in the HPS treatment. ...
Context 2
... cumulative total and marketable yield over the whole harvest period was not different between the HPS and plasma lights; while the average fruit size was greater under plasma (Table 3), which might be due to its full light spectrum similar to sunlight (Figure 2). There was significant interaction effect between the overhead and LED lights on the average fruit size. ...

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... The reports on cucumber leaf anatomical and physiological response to light intensity and quality in the production conditions are scarce. The studies on the effect of supplemental lighting with different light sources are mainly focused on fruit yield and economical aspects of cucumber production [8][9][10][11]15]. Physiological and biochemical reactions of plants to different light treatments are mainly evaluated at the seedling stage [19,20,[45][46][47]. ...
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... Rights reserved. Guo et al. (2016) Content courtesy of Springer Nature, terms of use apply. Rights reserved. ...
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... Many studies have reported that individual wavelengths can differentially affect fruit production (Li and Kubota, 2009;Hogewoning, 2010aHogewoning, , 2012Hikosaka et al., 2013;Guo et al., 2016aGuo et al., , 2016bHao et al., 2016;Amoozgar et al., 2017;Yang et al., 2017). For example, Pepin et al. (2014) suggested that tomato crop yield may be achieved by providing supplemental LED lighting within the plant canopy under low natural light conditions. ...
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