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The landslide that occurred behind Denimanu in March 2017 necessitating the abandonment of the island's primary school. Photo A shows the view of the landslide from the sea (Photo by Piérick Martin). Photo B shows the upper part of the landslide with a school building on the right (Photo by Patrick Nunn). 

The landslide that occurred behind Denimanu in March 2017 necessitating the abandonment of the island's primary school. Photo A shows the view of the landslide from the sea (Photo by Piérick Martin). Photo B shows the upper part of the landslide with a school building on the right (Photo by Patrick Nunn). 

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Island societies are being disproportionately affected by climate change, a situation likely to continue for some decades. Using an example of an island affected by multiple climate-linked stressors, a situation likely to become more common in the future, this paper examines the nature of these, the ways they are perceived and responded to by local...

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... numerous landslides were clearly visible on the steep slopes at the back of the pockets of coastal plain, along the edges of Yadua, the most memorable was that which occurred in March 2017 and destroyed two of the buildings comprising the island's primary school (Fig. 4A, B). Schoolchildren have since been instructed in tents (provided by UNICEF) within the main part of ...
Context 2
... numerous landslides were clearly visible on the steep slopes at the back of the pockets of coastal plain, along the edges of Yadua, the most memorable was that which occurred in March 2017 and destroyed two of the buildings comprising the island's primary school (Fig. 4A, B). Schoolchildren have since been instructed in tents (provided by UNICEF) within the main part of ...
Context 3
... numerous landslides were clearly visible on the steep slopes at the back of the pockets of coastal plain, along the edges of Yadua, the most memorable was that which occurred in March 2017 and destroyed two of the buildings comprising the island's primary school (Fig. 4A, B). Schoolchildren have since been instructed in tents (provided by UNICEF) within the main part of ...

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... Overcoming a reluctance to undertake TA has been helped by providing livelihoods for people in the new location, as shown by the provision of fishponds for the community of Vunidogoloa (Fiji) that was relocated several kilometres inland (Piggott-McKellar et al. 2019a, 2019b. In addition, in many smaller-island contexts, it is possible to move communities to less-vulnerable locations yet still allow them to access familiar places for food acquisition; Fiji examples come from the relocated community on Yadua Island (Martin et al. 2018) that is just 500 m from its former location and that at Narikoso on Ono Island which has recently moved about 200 m upslope (Barnett and McMichael 2018). To optimize their chances of sustained success, relocation processes should include community consultation, guaranteeing free and informed consent of the relocated population (McAdam and Ferris 2015), something that should also apply to community adaptation per se in such situations (McNamara et al. 2020;Westoby et al. 2019). ...
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