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The impact of lifejacket wear on survivability during life at risk incidents, including: (a) the percentage of survivors found wearing lifejackets over time to casualty, showing that a greater number of people need to wear lifejackets in order to survive longer during life at risk incidents; and (b) the total split of lifejacket wear among survivors and fatalities. 

The impact of lifejacket wear on survivability during life at risk incidents, including: (a) the percentage of survivors found wearing lifejackets over time to casualty, showing that a greater number of people need to wear lifejackets in order to survive longer during life at risk incidents; and (b) the total split of lifejacket wear among survivors and fatalities. 

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Drowning and fatalities at sea are a large concern globally. In the UK, many sea rescues are performed by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, and this study investigates 6 years’ worth of their rescue data to better understand causation of drowning and what makes an incident at sea high risk. A Poisson model is applied to numerous factors reco...

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... the percentage of survivors wearing lifejackets against the time to rescue shows the 182 impact that a lifejacket has on survivability over time. There is an increase in percentage of 183 survivors rescued wearing lifejackets from 35 % rescued after 10 minutes, compared to 55 % 184 at 60 minutes and ~80 % of survivors rescued after 120 minutes are shown to be wearing 185 lifejackets (Figure 1a). This figure provides a basic predictive capacity for survivability, for 186 example, if 10 people were to get into a LAR situation at sea, on average only two of the 187 individuals would have the ability to survive without the aid of a lifejacket. Therefore, if a 188 rescue asset will take two hours to reach or find a casualty, in order to survive two hours in 189 with the seasons (Figure 3). In summer months, the proportion of fatalities in leisure users is 211 0 250 500 750 Occurence seen to increase from 20 % in winter to around 45 %. Conversely, the percentage of 212 commercial fatalities increases from 5% in summer months, to 25 % in winter months. highlighted how of the four broad categories of incident, the 'Other' category (typically 220 motor vehicles and aircraft) showed a strong positive correlation with fatality. That is echoed 221 in Table 4, where incidents are further broken down by activity. Motor vehicle incidents 222 typically result in the most fatalities, with 80 fatalities per 1,000 incidents. Flying also 223 features highly with 60 fatalities per 1,000 incidents. These two activities are atypical of the 224 remainder in the chart, as it is highly unlikely (other than in cases of self-harm or suicide) that 225 the people undertaking these activities ever anticipated coming into contact with the sea or 226 beach. Although these activities have a high fatality rate, their overall occurrence is low, with 227 only 225 motor vehicle and 183 flying incidents over the study period (Table 4) vehicle accidents are omitted, as these are both activities where there was never any intended 242 interaction with the coast and therefore there is no scope for education or prevention. Of the 243 two, the main anomaly is that of flying, which has high fatality rate and high lifejacket wear.aircraft, the impact can be catastrophic and regardless of the preparation taken by casualties 246 prior to impact (such as donning the lifejacket), the impact itself proves fatal. Clearly 247 lifejacket wear is inappropriate for some activities, such as scuba diving or walking, both of 248 which feature low lifejacket wear rates. ...

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