The food guide pyramid for older adults. From: Tufts University, 2002: TUFTS food guide pyramid for older adults. Available at http://nutrition.tufts.edu/docs/pyramid.pdf, accessed 8 February 2009.

The food guide pyramid for older adults. From: Tufts University, 2002: TUFTS food guide pyramid for older adults. Available at http://nutrition.tufts.edu/docs/pyramid.pdf, accessed 8 February 2009.

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Adults age 60 and older will comprise two-thirds of the diabetic population by the year 2025. Older patients with diabetes are more likely to have coexistent chronic conditions like hypertension, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular disease that may impact their nutritional requirements. The issue of attainment and maintenance of an optimal body weight...

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... one study, the knowledge, design and content scores of educa- tion were significantly higher in the certified diabetes educator registered dietitians (CDE-RDs) compared to those of the non-cer- tified diabetes educator registered dietitians (non-CDE-RDs) [19]. A ''Food Guide Pyramid for Older Adults" is available for use in the elderly population (Fig. 1). The American Diabetes Association (ADA) Diabetes Food Pyramid (available at http://www.diabe- tes.org/nutrition-and-recipes/nutrition/foodpyramid.jsp) divides food into six groups. The largest group consisting of servings of grains, beans, and starchy vegetables forms the base. The smallest group comprising of fats, sweets, and ...

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... One possible reason for the high effectiveness of school interventions can be due to the type of intervention and easier control over student dietary intakes in schools. The low effectiveness of interventions in middle-aged and elderly people may also be due to the consolidation of dietary habits and other behaviors in these people; so, modifying their behavior is very difficult (Rizvi, 2009;Young et al., 2003). ...
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... Birch and colleagues have also stated that in order to improve primary school children's healthy food preferences, experiences and strategies are needed to increase availability and accessibility to increase exposure to those foods that will then affect their willingness to taste [70]. The low effectiveness of interventions in middle-aged and elderly people may also be attributed to the consolidation of dietary habits and other behaviors in these people; so modifying their behavior is very difficult [71,72]. ...
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... A three-fold mechanism of proper diet, insulin intervention and physical activity for management of diabetes and slowing down the prevalence of the disease is need of the hour [6]. The prime objective is to maintain a proper diet, i.e., optimizing excessive calories is one of the possible ways to reduce the burden of the disease [7]. ...
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... Furthermore, malnutrition includes both overnutrition, due to excessive input or food intake and lack or limited physical output or activity, and under-nutrition, due to nutrient deficiency. 11 Diabetes mellitus is suggested to be linked with increased risk of frailty. [12][13][14][15] Among community-dwelling older people, frailty and pre-frailty were significant and independent predictors of T2DM, a major and potentially preventable risk factor for multiple comorbidities. ...
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Abstract Objectives. This study aims to describe the sociodemographic and clinical profile of working and retired staff and faculty age 55 years and older in an academic community living in Laguna, Philippines; to determine the proportion of participants with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM); and to describe the nutritional and frailty status of working and retired participants with T2DM. Methods. The study utilized a cross-sectional study design. The participants are current employees and retired faculty and staff of an academic community living in Bay and Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines. Stratified random sampling according to working status and gender was utilized. Participants with T2DM were determined and assessed based on their nutritional and frailty status using the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA), laboratory analysis, and mini nutritional assessment (MNA). Descriptive statistics were calculated for all continuous and categorical variables measured. Results. A total of 109 participants agreed to participate and completed the CGA, with 93.6% undergone blood extraction for laboratory analysis. The mean age of the participants was 63.7 (±5.8) and 57.8% belonged to the young-old subgroup. There were more working (60.6%) than the retired (39.4%) and more females (61.5%) than males (38.5%). There was a low level of malnutrition (0.9%) in this cohort. However, many had abdominal obesity and elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Low vitamin D was prevalent. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus was present among 14.7% of participants of which 93.8% were pre-frail and 6.3% were at risk for malnutrition. Conclusion. Although malnutrition and frailty were not prevalent among those with T2DM in this cohort, more participants were pre-frail and at risk for malnutrition. There are many opportunities to reduce the risk of malnutrition and frailty in the community. Early screening and interventions are recommended to improve the health and wellbeing of the working and retired participants.
... In the geriatric population, it is known that conditions such as decreased appetite, dietary restrictions, loneliness, and depression lead to malnutrition 15 . In the analysis performed on more than 10.000 elder people, it was reported that 20% of hospitalized patients and 4% of people receiving home care services were reported to have malnutrition 16 . ...
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... Birch and colleagues have also stated that in order to improve primary school children's healthy food preferences, experiences and strategies are needed to increase availability and accessibility to increase exposure to those foods that will then affect their willingness to taste [70]. The low effectiveness of interventions in middle-aged and elderly people may also be attributed to the consolidation of dietary habits and other behaviors in these people; so modifying their behavior is very difficult [71,72]. ...
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... According to Khanam et al. [3], 80% of elderly people have at least one chronic disease, and 60% of elderly people have more than one chronic disease. Diabetes is one of the common chronic diseases among the global population, and people older than 60 years of age are more susceptible to it [4]. In 2017, there were around 425 million diabetic patients worldwide [5]. ...
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Elderly diabetic patients in developed countries have been widely using digital health wearables for many years to manage their diabetes-related health data accurately. To encourage the increased adoption of digital health wearables among elderly diabetic patients in a developing country, Bangladesh, this study investigated the factors that influenced the existing elderly users’ continuance intention to use this technology. Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) has been used here as a theoretical basis. A model using structural equation modelling was developed for the elderly diabetic patients’ continuance intention to use digital health wearables. Survey-based data were collected in Bangladesh from 223 diabetic patients aged sixty years and older. This study found that all six constructs, namely, perceived usefulness (β=0.183), perceived ease of use (β=0.165), perceived irreplaceability (β=0.138), perceived credibility (β=0.165), compatibility (β=0.285) and social influence (β=0.226) had a positive influence on elderly diabetic patients’ continuance intention to use digital health wearables. Along with the theoretical contributions, the findings of this study can be used by developers of digital health wearables, manufacturers, marketers and health practitioners in developing better strategies to increase the elderly diabetic patients’ continuance intention to use this technology. Keywords: Digital health wearables; healthcare technology; diabetes; technology acceptance model (TAM)