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The flow channel is a balance between challenge and skill. Anxiety arises when challenges cannot be met with one's skills. If challenges are inadequate for one's skills, boredom accrues. Adapted from "The concept of flow", by J. Nakamura and M.  

The flow channel is a balance between challenge and skill. Anxiety arises when challenges cannot be met with one's skills. If challenges are inadequate for one's skills, boredom accrues. Adapted from "The concept of flow", by J. Nakamura and M.  

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In human-computer interaction, the trend towards gamification is part of the shift of focus from usability to the more holistic approach of user experience. Gamification is "the use of game elements in non-game contexts" and is increasingly used in a variety of domains such as crowd sourcing, health care, sustainability, sports and learning. In tod...

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... balance is called flow channel. As Figure 2 depicts, if one is above the flow channel (i. e., the skill cannot meet the challenge) anxiety is likely to occur. ...

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... These games, applied to different areas of education, especially those in which students are otherwise demotivated and consequently with low levels of involvement with learning activities, are able to bring about positive impacts on students. Applying gamification efficiently may enable the overcoming of learning challenges, both learning and gaining better academic results (Brühlmann et al. 2013). Hence, the efforts made to ensure efficient gamification include constant challenges and feedback as well as high levels of interactivity (Pilar et al. 2016;Taspinar et al. 2016). ...
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Presentation
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