The five Nordic Nations, Norden, have not engaged in war with one another since 1815
A dispute between Finland and Sweden over the strategically located Åland Islands was resolved through mediation. The Åland Islands remain a demilitarised and neutral area. Reproduced with permission of Douglas P. Fry; copyright © Douglas P. Fry, all rights reserved.

The five Nordic Nations, Norden, have not engaged in war with one another since 1815 A dispute between Finland and Sweden over the strategically located Åland Islands was resolved through mediation. The Åland Islands remain a demilitarised and neutral area. Reproduced with permission of Douglas P. Fry; copyright © Douglas P. Fry, all rights reserved.

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A comparative anthropological perspective reveals not only that some human societies do not engage in war, but also that peaceful social systems exist. Peace systems are defined as clusters of neighbouring societies that do not make war with each other. The mere existence of peace systems is important because it demonstrates that creating peaceful...

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... We also can better understand the possibilities for peace through tourism by examining recent research by Fry et al. (2021) that offered a comparative anthropological perspective on societies within peace systems that were found to not only avoid war but also to actively foster intergroup connection. This robust research uncovered five significant factors: overarching common identity; positive social interconnectedness; interdependence; non-warring values and norms; non-warring myths, rituals, and symbols; and peace leadership. ...
... This robust research uncovered five significant factors: overarching common identity; positive social interconnectedness; interdependence; non-warring values and norms; non-warring myths, rituals, and symbols; and peace leadership. These, they argued, can be used in policy development to promote and sustain peace, cohesion and cooperation that could assist in addressing even our wickedest threats and interwoven global challenges such as global pandemics, oceanic pollution, loss of biodiversity, nuclear proliferation, and climate change (Fry et al., 2021). ...
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United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 16 focuses on fostering inclusive, just and peaceful societies to ensure sustainable development. This can be an important catalyst to sustainable tourism and draws needed attention to the value of peace through tourism thinking. We might ask by what means could we address structural injustices in tourism and additionally harness tourism for greater inclusivity, justice and sustainability? Peace through tourism analyses could benefit from engagement with peace studies thinking on peace with justice, issues of violence, frameworks for fostering positive peace, peace pedagogies and critical literacies in non-violence. Additionally, this article argues tourism must be understood in its wider context and the contribution it may make to both causing and countering structural injustices. We briefly explore emerging thinking on ecocide and decolonisation in order to illuminate the need for a greater engagement in multi-logical, multi-layered and critical thinking in tourism studies. By furthering the peace tourism agenda, this work underscores the need to frame tourism in terms of peace and justice concerns. It also supports recent claims that tourism must be assessed and addressed in its wider structural context. This is a critical and timely discussion as global tourism struggles through multiple crises and challenges.