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The empirical cumulative density of visitation loss percentage of Black-owned restaurants and ownership-unreported restaurants in selected cities

The empirical cumulative density of visitation loss percentage of Black-owned restaurants and ownership-unreported restaurants in selected cities

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Black communities in the U.S. have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic; however, few empirical studies have been conducted to examine the conditions of Black-owned businesses in the U.S. during this challenging time. In this paper, we assess the circumstances of Black-owned restaurants during the entire year of 2020 through a...

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