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The dynamics of coccidia infection in young rabbits within experimental groups, during the fattening  

The dynamics of coccidia infection in young rabbits within experimental groups, during the fattening  

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Two simultaneous experiments were carried out in a breeding farm of New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus f. domesticus) to determine the feasibility of replacing coccidiostats with garlic and oregano preparation. The research took place during June and July, the period of the greatest threat of coccidiosis caused by Eimeria spp. (Apicom...

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... the animals were found to be infected with coccidia. Through the whole period of fattening, the mildest course of infection was demonstrated for young rabbits of herbal group D, and Baycox group B (Fig. 1), with Eimeria sp. infection ranging from 460 to 20260 OPG in group D, and from 760 to 20000 OPG in group B. The oocyst counts of the young rabbits in group C, robenidine, ranged from 580 to 34220 OPG, whereas the highest counts were found in rabbits without anticoccidial drugs in their feed (Group A) (840-49740 ...

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... Pure or mixed extracts from Laminaceae and Amaryllidaceae also have anti-coccidial effects. Two simultaneous experiments on a breeding farm for New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus f. domestica) to determine the feasibility of replacing artificial coccidiostats with garlic and oregano preparations showed a positive influence of the additives on the degree and course of coccidia infection, which helped maintain a good level of animal productivity, and suggested that these herbal extracts may be of value in coccidiosis prophylaxis (NOSAL et al., 2014). THANGARASU et al. (2016) reported an in vitro antimicrobial effect and an inhibitory effect against E. tenella sporulation of the garlic compounds sulfur, allicin, dialyl sulfide and allylcysteine. ...
... THANGARASU et al. (2016) reported an in vitro antimicrobial effect and an inhibitory effect against E. tenella sporulation of the garlic compounds sulfur, allicin, dialyl sulfide and allylcysteine. Experiments with the commercially produced Bell Gold and Bell Premium preparations (Bellako Ltd., Zabrze, Poland) containing biologically active compounds from garlic and oregano have confirmed the coccidiocidal effect of plant extracts administered to rabbits during the weaning period (the period in which rabbits are most affected by eimeriosis) (NOSAL et al., 2014). Based on production indicators and mortality status, the commercial preparation Emanox PMX (containing plant extracts from oregano, thyme, mint, rosemary, marjoram and garlic) can achieve results against coccidiosis that are comparable to those of the chemically based preparation Sulfacox (FIK et al., 2015). ...
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... There have also been several studies reporting on the attenuating effect of garlic (Allium sativum) on intestinal coccidiosis in rabbits (Kowalska, Bielański, Nosal & Kowal, 2012;Nosal, Kowalska, Bielański, Kowal & Kornás, 2014). Furthermore, garlic possesses antimicrobial (also against Escherichia species), antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects (Al-Quraishy et al., 2011;Ankri & Mirelman, 1999;Iciek, Kwiecień & Włodek, 2009). ...
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... Previous suggestions included an increase in the use and production of organic food, along with extracts of medicinal plants. ere are reports that support the effect that plant extracts have on the elimination of oocysts of Eimeria spp. in rabbits, such as garlic (Allium sativum) and oregano (Origanum vulgare) extracts [11,12]. However, data concerning the effects of medicinal plant extracts on the coccidiosis in rabbits are scarce. ...
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... Sublinical coccidiosis shows mild symptoms where it has a good prognosis because subclinical infection will produce natural immunity (Mayer and Donnelly, 2013). Rabbits infected with subclinical coccidiosis will be better if given herbal formulations in their feed (Nosal et al, 2014). The number of oocysts needed to cause pathogenic effects varies in each type of oocyst (Caudert et al, 1995). ...
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The objective of the research was to investigate body weight, oocyte elimination and blood profile of rabbits infected with various doses of Eimeria stiedai isolates. The observed rabbits’ blood profile included erythrocyte, hemoglobin, hematocrit, leucocyte, thrombocyte, total protein plasma (TPP) and fibrinogen. Twenty-five male New Zealand White rabbits aged 3 months and weighed approximately 2 kg were provided with pellet and boiled drinking water and Eimeria stiedai isolates. The experiment used Completely Randomized Design to analyze 5 treatments with five replicates. The examined variables included D0: Infection 0 (control of infection without challenge test), D1: Infection 101 with challenge test 103, D2: infection 102 with challenge test 103, D3: infection 103 with challenge test 103, D4: infection 0 with challenge test 103 (control of infection). Data were subject to analysis of variance followed by Honestly Significant Difference Test (HSD). Analysis of Variance result showed that there was no significant difference on body weight, oocyte elimination and blood profile including erythrocyte, hemoglobin, hematocrit, leucocyte, thrombocyte, and fibrinogen. However, total protein plasma (TTP) was significantly different at 5% HSD. It can be concluded that challenge test with Eimeria stiedai has not been used as an alternative in increasing rabbits’ body immune against coccidiosis infection.