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3 The differences between the weights as determined on the digital scale and triple beam balance. The sausage on the far right weighed 1.6 grams more on the triple-balance beam than on the digital scale. Circles are colored according to the student team who made the measurements. 

3 The differences between the weights as determined on the digital scale and triple beam balance. The sausage on the far right weighed 1.6 grams more on the triple-balance beam than on the digital scale. Circles are colored according to the student team who made the measurements. 

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During the past several years, we have conducted a number of instructional interventions with students aged 12 – 14 with the objective of helping students develop a foundation for statistical thinking, including the making of informal inferences from data. Central to this work has been the consideration of how different types of data influence the...

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... To continue the development of visualization and measure of distribution, we introduce a new signal and noise process, based on contexts of production (Konold and Harradine 2014). For example, students attempt to manufacture "candies" of a standard size out of clay. ...
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