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The corticolimbic system consists of several brain regions that include the rostral anterior cingulate cortex, hippocampal formation, and basolateral amygdala. The anterior cingulate cortex has a central role in processing emotional experiences at the conscious level and selective attentional responses. Emotionally related learning is mediated through the interactions of the basolateral amygdala and hippocampal formation and motivational responses are processed through the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (from Benes, 2010). 

The corticolimbic system consists of several brain regions that include the rostral anterior cingulate cortex, hippocampal formation, and basolateral amygdala. The anterior cingulate cortex has a central role in processing emotional experiences at the conscious level and selective attentional responses. Emotionally related learning is mediated through the interactions of the basolateral amygdala and hippocampal formation and motivational responses are processed through the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (from Benes, 2010). 

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... allows children to learn conventions from the output of parents who, because of their ability to monitor and control their responses, may never master them themselves! We can now explore in more detail the cortical and limbic interactions that are involved (represented in Figure 8). The most basic division of cortico-limbic structures is not left/right, but rather dorsal/ventral. ...

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... Frontal lobe complexity is demonstrated by prefrontal cortex interconnectedness with the motor regions of the frontal lobes (Bernard et al., 2016), the posterior associative cortex (Barbas, 2015;Fuster, 2015), the limbic (motivational) (Barbas, 2015;Tucker and Luu, 2021), and ascending reticular activating system (arousal) (Jang and Kwon, 2015). These interconnections, in particular, with the dorso thalamic nucleus projections, describe the primary features of prefrontal cortical organization (Leisman and Melillo, 2012;Bubb et al., 2017;Kamali et al., 2020). ...
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