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The computing architecture of Pegasus II.

The computing architecture of Pegasus II.

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Conference Paper
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With the gradual maturity of the software and hardware of quadruped robots, the application scenarios of quadruped robots are increasing, such as security, rescue, exploration and other tasks. Quadruped robots are flexible and adaptive to challenging or complex environment. This study presents a large-scale quadruped robot, Pegasus II, which is a n...

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Context 1
... computing architecture of Pegasus II is shown in Fig. 4. A control PC (NVIDIA Jetson TX1) with a robot controller and run the deep learning to perceive the terrains. This host pc is also used to run the low-level controller, including MPC, WBC and state estimator. IMU communicates with TX2 through USB 3.0 to feedback the posture information. Operator is also able to directly send command ...

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... Quadruped locomotion has been a vibrant research field, reaching a level of maturity and performance that enables some of the most advanced real-world applications with the autonomous quadruped robots both in academia and industry [1][2][3][4]. The quadruped robots are adaptable to the complex terrains, such as the steep slopes in the mountains, the forest, and the warehouses [5]. ...
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