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The 'Walking City', designed by Ron Herron in 1964 (http://www.fabiofeminofantascience.org/RETROFUTURE/RETROFUTURE13.html). 

The 'Walking City', designed by Ron Herron in 1964 (http://www.fabiofeminofantascience.org/RETROFUTURE/RETROFUTURE13.html). 

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Despite the ongoing discussion of the recent years, there is no agreed definition of a ‘smart city’, while strategic planning in this field is still largely unexplored. Inspired by this, the purpose of this paper was to identify the forces shaping the smart city conception and, by doing so, to begin replacing the currently abstract image of what it...

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... sioned radical ideas about fully mechanized cities. Some of the most important embracers of these ideas were R. Meier, T. Zenetos, M. McLuhan, Y. Friedman, C. Price and groups such as Archigram, Superstudio and Archizoom Associati. The most well-known works of Archigram are the 'Plug-in-City' (Fig. 4), designed by P. Cook and the 'Walking City' (Fig. 5), designed by R. Herron, both in 1964. Architect T. Zenetos conceived the idea of 'Electronic Urbanism' (Fig. 6), a city model that embraces networked technology in favor of social equity and creativity, in connection with the natural habitat, economy of energy and time and sustain- ability. His model calls for tele-working, ...

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