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The Risk of Mosquito Proliferation at Construction Sites. (A) Elevator shaft flooded with stagnated water in a construction site. From left to right: elevator shaft; stagnated water and accumulated trash inside elevator shaft; survey of immature mosquitoes breeding in the elevator shaft. (B) Jersey plastic barrier, filled with water, breeding vector mosquitoes. From left to right: Jersey plastic barrier; stagnated water inside Jersey plastic barrier; adult Aedes aegypti inside a Jersey plastic barrier. (C) Stagnant water on the construction site floor serving as breeding sites for Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. From left to right: shallow pool of stagnant water; Ae. aegypti larvae and pupae breeding in this habitat. (D) Accumulated trash in a construction site environment potentially creating breeding sites for vector mosquitoes.

The Risk of Mosquito Proliferation at Construction Sites. (A) Elevator shaft flooded with stagnated water in a construction site. From left to right: elevator shaft; stagnated water and accumulated trash inside elevator shaft; survey of immature mosquitoes breeding in the elevator shaft. (B) Jersey plastic barrier, filled with water, breeding vector mosquitoes. From left to right: Jersey plastic barrier; stagnated water inside Jersey plastic barrier; adult Aedes aegypti inside a Jersey plastic barrier. (C) Stagnant water on the construction site floor serving as breeding sites for Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. From left to right: shallow pool of stagnant water; Ae. aegypti larvae and pupae breeding in this habitat. (D) Accumulated trash in a construction site environment potentially creating breeding sites for vector mosquitoes.

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The construction industry employs millions of workers in the USA. However, little is known about how environmental disturbances caused by the construction industry impacts vector mosquito ecology and behavior, and whether it is responsible for increasing the abundance of mosquitoes. There is a major scientific gap on how to assess the occupational...

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Context 1
... done in Miami-Dade County, Florida, by Wilke et al. [14] found that immature and adult Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus were breeding in high numbers at construction sites in the accumulated stagnant water in elevator and stair shafts, Jersey plastic barriers, and on puddles on the floor ( Figure 1A-C). Findings of this study provided information on how early-phase construction sites are often vulnerable to ambient elements and may collect rain and groundwater on the widely available artificial containers spread out throughout the area. ...
Context 2
... the Zika virus outbreak in Miami-Dade County in 2016, construction workers from the Caribbean with asymptomatic infection inadvertently brought the Zika virus to Miami, and were subsequently bitten by Ae. aegypti mosquitoes breeding in high numbers at a construction site located in the city of Miami Beach, Florida, triggering a Zika virus outbreak [27,28]. Proactively, the Miami-Dade Mosquito Control Division issued a brochure alerting for the risk of the proliferation of mosquitoes in construction sites (see Figure S1 in the supplemental information online). ...
Context 3
... workers are available in large numbers and spend a disproportional amount of the workday outdoors being exposed to vector mosquitoes present in high numbers at the job site. Moreover, by neglecting existing safety guidelines and best practices, such as the removal of accumulated trash and stagnated water, construction companies are making available many potential breeding habitats for mosquito vector species ( Figure 1D). ...

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... For instance, Ae. (Stg.) aegypti breeding sites are usually located inside households (Valle 2016), yet also being described for other urban habitats, such as construction sites (Wilke et al. 2019b). The entire territory of RS has favorable climatic conditions for the Ae. ...
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... Further, mosquitoes can quickly breed in urban infrastructure where water stagnates (Wilke et al., 2019b). Reduction in biodiversity, deforestation (Burkett-Cadena and Vittor, 2018;Sylvie Manguin and Christophe Boete, 2011), increased construction (Wilke et al., 2019a), proximity to agricultural areas (Nguyen-Tien et al., 2019), higher humidity, and many other factors may have a role to play in the spread of mosquitoes and MBDs. ...
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... It is the primary vector of CHIKV, DENV, yellow fever (YFV), and ZIKV [10][11][12][13][14], and is implied responsible for the majority of the cases worldwide. Aedes aegypti is remarkably adapted to thrive in urban and suburban areas alongside humans widely benefiting from anthropogenic alterations in the environment [15][16][17][18][19][20]. Being able to thrive in urban environments represent a significant advantage for Ae. ...
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