| The Reading Rope (Scarborough, 2001).

| The Reading Rope (Scarborough, 2001).

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
For the past several decades, education researchers have devoted a lot of time, energy, and practice to gaining an understanding of literacy and the cognitive processes that control it. This research has developed, evidence has converged around certain findings, and teaching methods for reading and literacy have changed for the better because of it...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... the model of the SVR might be a little bit too distilled: for a teacher without extended insight to the concepts of decoding and comprehension and the knowledge of what those concepts entail, the SVR doesn't provide adequate guidance despite the fact that it is sound and controllable. Instead, teachers can easily turn to the Reading Rope model (fig. 2). This model expands the SVR into two strands of a rope: Language Comprehension (similar to SVR's comprehension component) and Word Recognition (similar to SVR's decoding component). Within each strand, Scarborough further breaks down the Rope into individual threads that define those strands and help a teacher understand the individual ...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
Five years since its launch in 2010, Classics for All (CfA) has an increasingly high profile in schools. For anyone still not in the picture, C fA works to increase take-up of Classics (Latin, Greek, Classical Civilisation, Ancient History) in state primary and secondary schools across the UK.

Citations

... And secondly, because it is a skill which I, and others, believe to be teachable (Hansen, 1999;Markus & Ross, 2004;Hoyos, 2006;McCaffrey, 2009). Not only that, but whatever our starting point, Wegenhart (2015) believes that by encouraging these reading skills early, we can encourage our students to be 'expert' readers who will be able to enjoy reading Latin long after they have been through their exams. ...
... Read Like a Roman: Teaching Students to Read in Latin Word Order reading environment are beyond the control of the teacher, he or she is still able to manipulate certain factors (such as the purpose of reading) to facilitate the best comprehension from students. Wegenhart (2015), in a different approach to Hamilton, uses research based on learning to read English to inform the teaching of Latin and Greek. He advocates the Reading Rope and Cognitive Reading maps to help teachers identify at which point students are being held back in their reading comprehension and adapting their teaching accordingly. ...
... In order to achieve this fluency, Wegenhart (2015) makes explicit how important a large working vocabulary is to reading Latin. He identifies students' phonic awareness as an indicator of their ability to recall vocabulary. ...
Article
Full-text available
For countless students of Latin (myself included), prevailing memories of Latin instruction involve being taught to unpick Latin sentences by racing towards the verb and securing the meaning of the main clause before piecing together the rest. However, this ‘hunt the verb’ approach, where one's eyes are jumping back and forth in search of the resolution of ambiguity, is not necessarily conducive to fluent reading of Latin (Hoyos, 1993). If, as so many textbooks and teachers vouch, we are aiming to unlock Roman authors for all students to read, then we need to furnish them with the skills to be able to read Latin fluently, automatically and with enjoyment, not engender in them a process more akin to puzzle-breaking. I chose to experiment with teaching students to read Latin in order, firstly because, as Markus and Ross (2004) point out, the Romans themselves must necessarily have been able to understand Latin in the order in which it was composed as so much of their sharing of literature happened orally. Indeed, as Kuhner (2016) and others who promote the continuation of spoken Latin have argued, this is still a very real possibility today. And secondly, because it is a skill which I, and others, believe to be teachable (Hansen, 1999; Markus & Ross, 2004; Hoyos, 2006; McCaffrey, 2009). Not only that, but whatever our starting point, Wegenhart (2015) believes that by encouraging these reading skills early, we can encourage our students to be ‘expert’ readers who will be able to enjoy reading Latin long after they have been through their exams.
Article
Research has indicated that reading aloud to young students can enhance their foundational reading skills and their reading motivation, but such research has been lacking in African contexts. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of story read‐aloud lessons in improving students’ foundational reading skills in Nigeria. The experiment took place in a cluster randomized trial of 199 schools in Northern Nigeria. In treatment schools, second‐grade teachers conducted weekly read‐aloud lessons as an addition to the core learning curriculum. In control schools, second‐grade teachers implemented only the core curriculum, without weekly read‐aloud lessons. We found that story read‐alouds led to positive effects on listening comprehension, letter sound recognition, nonword decoding, and reading fluency, with effect sizes between 0.17 and 0.33 standard deviations. These outcomes suggest that enhanced student motivation from read‐alouds may enhance text‐based skills. To identify the effects of increased teacher experience on read‐aloud effectiveness, we employed a two‐period difference‐in‐differences approach. We found that increased teacher experience explained between 26% and 51% of the overall read‐aloud effect, depending on the literacy subskill. We also found that the read‐aloud effects coupled with increased teacher experience had an equalizing effect on the reading outcomes of students from divergent home literacy environments.
Article
Full-text available
As a Latin teacher, I think a lot about reading. Without texts I would not have a subject to teach, and the goal of many Latin programs (including my own) is teaching students to read Latin texts. I began my Latin teaching career while teaching the language to myself as well. The goal (both for myself and my students) was to read Latin confidently and fluidly, from left to right, processing the meaning of the words as my eye scanned the pages. Yet my good intentions were soon frustrated, and I was baffled by a problem which I soon realised was not unique to my situation: despite years of training, neither I nor my students could read Latin in a natural, fluid way. Furthermore, textbooks and colleagues seemed resigned to the view that such a goal was unrealistic or unobtainable. Best to treat language as a puzzle to be solved, or linguistic knot to be untangled, rather than a language expressing a message. Only the most intellectually gifted students continued in my ‘puzzle-solving’ course; consequently, my enrolment dropped off steeply after the second year. Looking for more help, I even implemented various ‘rules for reading’ and ‘reading strategies’ advocated by others, yet rather than improve student reading ability, I felt my curriculum begin to feel increasingly cluttered with activities and processes that stole away from my students the valuable time needed to interact with the language itself. It was not until I began investigating the field of Second Language Acquisition (hereafter SLA) that I discovered some simple, yet fundamental principles about language that helped explain my students’ struggles and helped me rethink language teaching in general.