Figure 4 - uploaded by Yunisrina Qismullah Yusuf
Content may be subject to copyright.
The Learning Pyramid (adapted from NTL Institute for Applied Behavioral Science, Bethel, Maine , 1954). Based on Figure 4, it is deemed that learners learn most when they teach it to someone else or employ it directly, and they learn less from what they read or hear, such as a lecture. 

The Learning Pyramid (adapted from NTL Institute for Applied Behavioral Science, Bethel, Maine , 1954). Based on Figure 4, it is deemed that learners learn most when they teach it to someone else or employ it directly, and they learn less from what they read or hear, such as a lecture. 

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
Over the years, linguists have proposed numerous theories on foreign or second language and learning approaches. Previously, Structuralist Approach (SA) played a noteworthy role where linguists concentrated further on language competence. In language development, linguists nowadays have focused more on the learners themselves or independent learner...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... the process, they take charge of their own learning of that particular language. Learners are more likely to retain and transfer knowledge to real life, and this can be seen in the Learning Pyramid (NTL Institute for Applied Behavioral Science, see Figure 4), where 90% of what they learn is when they teach it to someone else or use it immediately. In Figure 4, the percentages represent the average amount of information that is retained or the retention rates through that particular learning method. ...
Context 2
... are more likely to retain and transfer knowledge to real life, and this can be seen in the Learning Pyramid (NTL Institute for Applied Behavioral Science, see Figure 4), where 90% of what they learn is when they teach it to someone else or use it immediately. In Figure 4, the percentages represent the average amount of information that is retained or the retention rates through that particular learning method. Figure 4, it is deemed that learners learn most when they teach it to someone else or employ it directly, and they learn less from what they read or hear, such as a lecture. ...
Context 3
... Figure 4, the percentages represent the average amount of information that is retained or the retention rates through that particular learning method. Figure 4, it is deemed that learners learn most when they teach it to someone else or employ it directly, and they learn less from what they read or hear, such as a lecture. ...

Citations

Article
Full-text available
Objectives: To know the perception of peer-learning among first batch of 1st year medical students in CMH Kharian Medical College. Study Design: Cross-Sectional study. Setting: CMH Kharian Medical College. Period: June 2018 and September 2018. Material & Methods: Questionnaire was distributed among hundred first year medical students on self-reflection and feedback after 15 min power point presentation given by their fellow students based on different pathophysiological scenarios. Results: Out of 100 students, 85 filled out questionnaire form completely. 60% of students were of the opinion that peer-learning facilitated them to perform better in the exam, and can be continued for future batches. 50% of students agreed that this innovative learning modality was conducted in a systematic manner, helped them to improve their understanding of the subject and learning was fostered based on the principles of self-reflection and feedback. Problem solving ability was improved by peer learning format according to 49% of students, while 47% of students reported that this innovative learning strategy provided them with a tool to improve their learning through interaction, while research capabilities of 37% students were improved. Conclusion: Majority of first year medical students lacking senior guidance learned better in a comfortable environment from their peers, and improved understanding of the core subject by realizing the implication of the concept of self-reflection and feedback.