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The Indigenous Stages of Developmental Learning, as shown by Cajete, 1994, p. 211.  

The Indigenous Stages of Developmental Learning, as shown by Cajete, 1994, p. 211.  

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Creating an indigenous experiential learning model

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Context 1
... white corn meal is representative of the east, the eastern sacred mountain (Sis Naajin7), and the white of early dawn. The yellow corn meal represents the west, the western sacred mountain (Dook'o'oos[77d), and the yellow of evening twilight (Reichard, 1990). This author sees this practice as a means of centering one's mind, body, and spirit at the beginning of each day and again bringing one's mind, body, and spirit back to centeredness at the close of each day. ...

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