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The Freesa application form.

The Freesa application form.

Source publication
Article
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In this photo essay, a group of six academics contributed to a cross-disciplinary conversation about immigration, mobility and circulation. We tasked ourselves with subverting crisis narratives attached to global migration by exploring the habitual, mundane, and everyday aspects of migration, as well bringing into focus the bodily, intimate and aff...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... form recalls that of a US customs form, but the latter's set of questions is replaced with affective reflections such as "Where do you belong?" The Freesa form also invites the applicant to "Circle Home" on a small image of a stylized Pangea (the original supercontinent)-the online version using a conventional world map and physical address (Fig. ...

Citations

... She identifies various tensions that stem from her family's immigration to Canada, discussing how these emerged as responses to the organization of social and institutional life in their new society. As she writes, "identity is not just an abstract, internalized feeling; it is a lived, material reality: the languages our tongues (are allowed to) speak, the professions we (are allowed to) practice, and the alienation resulting from the physical and linguistic distances created by generations" (in Bisaillon et al. 2019Bisaillon et al. 1031. Her intervention corrects popular misconceptions that immigration only ushers in opportunities for people. ...
Article
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This article confronts mainstream discourses about poverty and inner city poor neighbourhoods. It argues that the ways that poverty and poor inner city neighbourhoods are made publicly known in writing and through visual representations present problems such as overpowering structural causes of health and illness, reifying false dichotomy of us and them, and normalizing people living in poverty or working poor people as de facto vulnerable. This can happen when the social relations that govern poverty and sustain human suffering eschew the social relations that produce these experiences. Taking these relations as the objects of analysis, this article focuses sociologically on the Dundas/Sherbourne neighbourhood in Toronto, Canada, as the terrain of inquiry. The aim here is to contribute to analyses of the political, social, and economic determinants of health as well as to critiques of bad-neighbourhood and bad decision discourses. To do this, it bridges visual practice with critical social analysis: drawing together the authors’ individual practices as visual artists, marshaling their social positions as residents of the adjacent St. James Town neighbourhood, and sharing their experiences of the Dundas/Sherbourne area. They employ insights from sensory ethnography and street photography to offer an alternative source of knowledge about the poor inner city that contrasts and contests mainstream ways of knowing these same spaces.
Book
Tens of thousands of Eritreans make perilous voyages across Africa and the Mediterranean Sea every year. Why do they risk their lives to reach European countries where so many more hardships await them? By visiting family homes in Eritrea and living with refugees in camps and urban peripheries across Ethiopia, Sudan, and Italy, Milena Belloni untangles the reasons behind one of the most under-researched refugee populations today. Balancing encounters with refugees and their families, smugglers, and visa officers, The Big Gamble contributes to ongoing debates about blurred boundaries between forced and voluntary migration, the complications of transnational marriages, the social matrix of smuggling, and the role of family expectations, emotions, and values in migrants’ choices of destinations.