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The Customer-Activity Cycle (Vandermerwe, 2000) 

The Customer-Activity Cycle (Vandermerwe, 2000) 

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... experience is a function of parameters that go beyond direct experience from the core product. To enrich customer experience, Vandermerwe (2004) introduced “Customer- Activity Cycle” approach. The approach presents three stages - the pre , during and post , and argues for identifying opportunities for providing new kinds of value to customer at each stage of critical experience. At a renal clinic, for example, the busi- ness-director, collaborated with customers map all the treatment activities – pre : when customer are deciding what to do, during : when customers are doing what they decided on and post : when cus- tomers are maintaining the results (Figure 1.) She emphasized that any disruption in the flow of cus- tomer-activity cycle creates value gaps, or disconti- nuities, that opens access to competitors, unless the company fills the gaps first with value add-ons. The activity cycle approach gives a customer- focus company an objective mean for exploring the value gaps and filling them with breakthrough val- ues. It is broad and explorative, and firms needs clear vision on which activities it is willing to ...

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