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Tertiary Sector Elasticities

Tertiary Sector Elasticities

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Part I of this paper attempts to provide an economic identity to the tertiary/service sector and highlights the competing hypotheses which have emerged in the development literature. Part II investigates the tertiary sector in the Indian economy, both in the context of national and regional development. Finally, provides directions for future resea...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... on the tertiary sector employment and income data, Statewise tertiary employment and income elasticity estimates have been derived. Column 2 of Table 10 depicts tertiary sector 'own' employment elasticity for the period 1981-91. The highest 'own' employment elasticity occurs in West Bengal, followed by Kerala, Punjab and Uttar Pradesh. ...

Citations

... goods Kumar and Mathur, 1996). In any case, a reclassification of subsectors may help explain growth of services, it does not negate their growth itself. ...
... This growth pattern has led to an increase in opportunities in the services sector in both the high-end and low-end. There is clear shift away from the earlier development process where countries moved from agriculture to industry to services, and this debate is well-documented (Kumar and Mathur, 1996). The divergence from the Kuznet's historical pattern in the nineties is not peculiar to India and can be observed in many other developing countries (Dasgupta and Singh, 2005). ...
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