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Ten highest diversity census tracts in the United States, 2010

Ten highest diversity census tracts in the United States, 2010

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... After sorting these tracts by their diversity scores I was able to determine the ten highest diversity tracts in the United States for the most recent decennial year (see Table 3). Three ...
Context 2
... Figure 4 as a guide, we can see that Mountain View (Tract 6) tops the list with a 2010 diversity score of 96. A glance at the tract ethnoracial compositions provided in Table 3 reveals that the six panethnic groups tend to be evenly distributed, as one would expect to find in highly diverse neighborhoods. One group in particular stands out in this list: Alaska Natives/American Indians. ...
Context 3
... their diversity scores are slightly lower. There is another group appearing in Table 3 that does not immediately spring to mind when discussing diversity: non-Hispanic Whites. Note that they constitute a significant non-majority segment of the residential mosaic in the Anchorage tracts. ...

Citations

... Alaska is home to some 58,000 immigrants, about 8% of its population (9% of females and 7% males), over half of whom are found in Anchorage (Farrell, 2018). Most of Alaska's immigrants, about six of 10, now trace their origins to Asia, particularly the Philippines, Korea, and Thailand. ...
... Alaska is home to some 58,000 immigrants, about 8% of its population (9% of females and 7% males), over half of whom are found in Anchorage (Farrell, 2018). Most of Alaska's immigrants, about six of 10, now trace their origins to Asia, particularly the Philippines, Korea, and Thailand. ...
... Institution and Student Body UAA is a midsized (14,955 undergraduate students in 2018) open-enrollment institution offering graduate and undergraduate programs. The city of Anchorage is rich in ethnorocial diversity (Farrell, 2016), which is reflected in enrollments; 41% of UAA students identify as non-White. Attendance patterns and academic preparation at UAA are typical to open-enrollment institutions: 54% of students attend part-time and 35% receive Pell Grants (UAA Office of Institutional Research, 2015); 63% require developmental education in at least one area (University of Alaska Statewide Office of Institutional Research, 2016). ...
Article
This paper explores the effect of a paired lab course on students' course outcomes in nonmajors introductory biology at the University of Alaska Anchorage. We compare course completion and final grades for 10,793 students (3736 who simultaneously enrolled in the lab and 7057 who did not). Unconditionally, students who self-select into the lab are more likely to complete the course and to earn a higher grade than students who do not. However, when we condition on observable course, academic, and demographic characteristics, we find much of this difference in student performance outcomes is attributable to selection bias, rather than an effect of the lab itself. The data and discussion challenge the misconception that labs serve as recitations for lecture content, noting that the learning objectives of science labs should be more clearly articulated and assessed independent of lecture course outcomes.
... Although Alaska has a well-deserved reputation as a rural and frontier state, the demographic diversity of its largest city, Anchorage, where more than one-half of the state's population resides, is often underappreciated. Seventeen percent of Anchorage residents speak a language other than English, and the Anchorage School District includes 27 of the 30 highest-diverse public schools in the nation (Early, 2017;Farrell, 2018). Approximately 100 different languages are spoken by children in the Anchorage school system, reflecting the significant diversity of their families (Anchorage School District, 2018). ...
Article
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Background: Anchorage, Alaska, has a large immigrant and refugee population. In fact, it is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the United States with almost 100 languages spoken by children in the public school system. The city's immigrant and refugee population speaks limited English, and most of these residents are unfamiliar with where or how to obtain health care services through the American health care system. Brief Description of Activity: We developed a peer language navigator (PLN) program. Implementation: The Anchorage Health Literacy Collaborative developed a community-wide program to address the health literacy needs of the city's immigrant and refugee population. Select people who attended Anchorage's adult literacy program (the Alaska Literacy Program) were chosen to learn about health and wellness topics as well as how to obtain health information from reliable online sources. These people, initially known as PLNs, were then trained to share health information resources with their respective communities. Results: A recent evaluation of the program using ripple effects mapping showed that the program has demonstrated wide success, providing understandable health information to hundreds of new English learners throughout the area and guiding them to reliable health and wellness information they can use for themselves, their families, and their community. PLNs have become leaders in their communities and have been renamed peer leader navigators. Lessons Learned: For similar programs to be successful, PLNs should be trained using adult learning principles, allowing them to focus on topics and issues of interest to them. The program should link with community organizations to extend the reach of the program. Care must be exercised to avoid overextending or overwhelming PLNs because after they become leaders in their communities, they will receive many requests to provide guidance and education. Finally, when possible, PLNs should be compensated so they can more fully devote their efforts to serving the community.
... Given the current composition of Anchorage's immigrant population, the question arises as to what degree immigrant residential patterns fall along existing color lines. Anchorage is an important case in that it has a long history of racial exclusion yet is currently home to some of the most diverse neighborhoods in the USA (Farrell, 2018;Hartman, 2018). ...
Chapter
In this chapter, we analyse the determinants of integration of foreign-born persons and second-generation immigrants (i.e. individuals with foreign-born parent/s) in four Nordic countries: Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. We investigate both objective (probability of having a paid work, achieved income) and more subjective measures of economic integration: self-perceived threat of unemployment in the upcoming 12 months and the declared comfort with the present income. Our results indicate that there is a penalty of being a first-generation immigrant in the Nordic countries: such individuals usually get employment, but their achieved income is substantially lower than that of natives, especially in Norway and Finland. We also find that second-generation immigrants are on average well integrated in economic aspect, with the exception of Sweden and Iceland.
... All four of these community gardens are located in the north/northeastern portions of Anchorage and provide a mechanism for making fresh, local foods available to some of Anchorage's most vulnerable and diverse populations. As noted in CNN [3], the Mountain View and surrounding neighborhoods (home to three of the four of Anchorage's community gardens) comprise the most diverse census tracts in the US bringing together community members from Alaska Native, Native American, Asian/Pacific Island, Latin American and other ethnic groups [4]. These neighborhoods also have Anchorage's lowest per capita incomes [5] and, unfortunately, encompass the city's highest incidences of crime [6]; raising questions about equitable and safe access to the gardens. ...
Article
Anchorage’s community gardening program is administered by the Municipality of Anchorage Parks and Recreation program and part of their mission is to provide “a food system where locally produced, affordable, and nutritious food is available to all”. The demand for access to community gardens far outweighs the supply raising the question, how can the city of Anchorage strategically and sustainably expand their community garden system? To explore this question, the Municipality of Anchorage partnered with the University of Alaska Anchorage to better understand how expanding community gardens can bridge a gap in the local food system and increase access to fresh foods by the city’s most vulnerable and diverse individuals. To do this, we developed a multi-faceted needs assessment that included a community survey, stakeholder workshop, and key informant interviews. This paper explores the opportunities and challenges of expanding Anchorage’s community gardens and offers expansion strategies that balance the needs of the community’s diverse populations with the city’s community gardening mission. The findings of this study show that to sustainably meet the needs of diverse audiences, community garden expansion efforts should focus on 1) making new gardens accessible by identifying safe, convenient, and functional locations; 2) building gardener capacity through education and outreach programs; and 3) strengthening partnerships with other community organizations to share resources and capabilities. The methods used and the associated findings revealed through this study can be adapted and applied in other cities looking to develop a sustainable and strategic model for community gardening.
Article
Cities around the world are creating formal planning documents proposing local actions to mitigate and prepare for the impacts of climate change. Despite a growing number of examples of such plans and “toolkits” that outline the process for undertaking these planning efforts, many cities are still struggling to know where to start. Furthermore, meta-analyses of existing climate action plans show that many suffer from similar limitations including lack of scientific input, failure to consider strategies across multiple sectors within local government, limited public involvement, narrow focus on mitigation, and lack of detail regarding implementation and monitoring. This paper describes our process for developing the Anchorage Climate Action Plan and our experience fusing a three-way partnership between the municipal government, a local university, and the broader Anchorage, Alaska community. We describe the nuts and bolts of our funding, leadership structure, and technical working sessions and reflect on the key structural, political, and social elements that catalysed plan development, adoption, and implementation. Our experience suggests that public support from municipal leaders, commitment from local experts, a dedicated steering committee, a diverse set of stakeholders, and a good working relationship with the local government officials (e.g. Assembly members or City Council) are critical to creating a successful framework for climate mitigation and adaptation planning in a community. Collaborative planning with a local university that prioritises community-engagement can support the development of a robust planning document that integrates local scientific expertise and is representative of the community it is meant to serve.
Chapter
Anchorage, Alaska embodies the demographic dynamism that is transforming the circumpolar region. The city sits on the traditional homelands of the Dena’ina Athabascan people and is increasingly a destination for immigrants and refugees, adding new dimensions to its rich cultural traditions. This chapter focuses on changing foreign-born populations, documenting the growth and origins of newcomers to Anchorage. This growth generates a community-wide opportunity, and evidence suggests that immigrant inclusion benefits the city’s economic and environmental resilience. But barriers to participation in the city’s economic and civic life continue to exist. This case study describes the Municipality’s “welcoming” program designed to dismantle those barriers and promote economic and civic inclusion as essential ingredients to community well-being and resilience.