Table 1 - uploaded by Hanan Osman
Content may be subject to copyright.
Technical specifications of turmeric, madder and rhubarb natural dyes

Technical specifications of turmeric, madder and rhubarb natural dyes

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
In the present work, cotton/wool 50/50 blended fabric is printed via three natural dyes nanoparticles namely: turmeric, madder and rhubarb. Dye powder of the three plants was milled for 30 days after which it was exposed to ultrasound for 6 hours. Cotton/wool substrate is mordanted prior to printing process using two mordants separately: tartaric a...

Similar publications

Article
Solution processed two-dimensional (2D) layered materials and their integration with additive manufacturing techniques, such as ink-jet printing, is a facile approach for incorporating these exotic materials into device platforms for flexible electronics. In this work, graphene ink formulations are successfully utilized toward the design and fabric...
Article
Full-text available
This study attempts to highlight the possibility of using natural dyes in transfer printing of polyester fabrics. The used dyes were Turmeric, Alkanet, and Rhubarb. To obtain optimum conditions for transfer printed polyester fabris, different factors were investigated such as concentration of dyes, the pH of printing paste and both the transfer tim...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, nickel zinc ferrite (NZF) nanopowder was mixed with organic vehicle which consists of linseed oil, m-xylene and α-terpineol. Then the mixture was sonicated for 1 hour at 40°C in order to obtain homogenous paste, followed by printing it onto FR4 substrate using the screen printing technique to form the NZF thick film layer before drie...

Citations

... Most natural dyes are extracted from plant roots, stems, leaves, and flowers, and they are widely used in fabric dyeing due to the advantages of large reserves and rich colors [1]. Compared with the synthetic dyes, natural dyes have many excellent characteristics including low toxicity, anti-oxidation, anti-bacterial and anti-ultraviolet properties [2,3]. With the enhancement of environmental protection awareness, the development and utilization of natural dyes have been paid more and more attention by some researchers. ...
... On the basis of measured CIE color measurement, the color differences (∆E) of the dyed cotton fabrics were calculated [Equation (2)]. The ∆E value is used to analyze the levelness of the dyed cotton fabric. ...
... The polycarboxylic As shown in Figure 2, the absorption peak at 3410 cm −1 was assigned to -OH stretching vibration and the band at 2900 cm −1 was due to C-H stretching vibration [21]. It could be observed that all dyed cotton fabrics appeared a similar anthraquinone ring vibration peak of madder dye at 1597 cm −1 [2], indicating the madder dye could dye in the cotton fabrics. And all cross-linked dyed cotton fabrics appeared the ester carbonyl absorption As shown in Figure 2, the absorption peak at 3410 cm −1 was assigned to -OH stretching vibration and the band at 2900 cm −1 was due to C-H stretching vibration [21]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Cotton fabrics were dyed with the madder and compounds of citric acid (CA) and dicarboxylic acids [tartaric acid (TTA), malic acid (MLA), succinic acid (SUA)] as cross-linking agents and sodium hypophosphite (SHP) as the catalyst. The molecular structures and crystal structures of the dyed cotton fabrics were analyzed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD), respectively. The results showed that the polycarboxylic acids esterified with the hydroxyl groups in the dye and cellulose, respectively, and the reaction mainly occurred in the amorphous region of the cotton fabric. Compared with the direct dyed cotton fabric, the surface color depth (K/S) values of the CA, CA+TTA, CA+MLA, CA+SUA cross-linked dyed cotton fabrics increased by approximately 160%, 190%, 240%, 270%, respectively. The CA+SUA cross-linked dyed cotton fabric achieved the biggest K/S value due to the elimination of the negative effect by α-hydroxyl in TTA and MLA on esterification reaction, and the cross-linked dyed cotton fabrics had great levelness property. The washing and rubbing fastness of the cross-linked cotton fabrics were above four levels. The light resistance stability and the antibacterial property of the cross-linked dyed cotton fabrics was obviously improved. The sum of warp and weft wrinkle recovery angle (WRA) of the CA+SUA cross-linked dyed cotton fabric was 55° higher than that of raw cotton fabric, and its average UV transmittance for UVA was less than 5% and its UPF value was 50+, showing a great anti-wrinkle and anti-ultraviolet properties.
... Urea considered an essential auxiliary in most printing pastes because of its ability to swell the fabrics that accelerate penetrating dye inside the fabrics [34]. In addition, it acts as a solvent for the dye i.e., used as moisture-absorbing agent and accelerates the migration of dye from the thickener film into the fabrics. ...
... Urea considered an essential auxiliary in most printing pastes because of its ability to swell the fabrics that accelerate penetrating dye inside the fabrics [34]. In addition, it acts as a solvent for the dye i.e., used as moisture-absorbing agent and accelerates the migration of dye from the thickener film into the fabrics. ...
Research
Full-text available
Hiren alkanet dye nanoparticles were successfully prepared by using simple ball milling technique at room temperature. UV-vis. absorption, XRD, TEM, FT-IR spectroscopy and SEM were used to characterize alkanet dye nanoparticles. The prepared alkanet dye nanoparticles were used as active ingredient for printing cotton, wool and polyester fabrics via dye printing technique and pigment printing technique. Factors of printing process were studied such as Mordanting of Substrates, thickeners type, urea concentration and Printing Paste pH for first paste and urea concentration, Printing Paste pH and binder concentration for second paste. Results shows fabrics printed with alkanet dye nanoparticles via mentioned two methods shows very good to excellent fastness properties with full green method. These data indicated that printed samples have high quality for colour strength without any environmental hazards compared with other conventual and nanotechnological aspects.
... Negative environmental impacts of synthetic dyes have aroused extensive interest in the use of natural colorants during the last few decades. Besides textile dyeing, certain natural dyes have been applied by printing technique as mentioned in previous works, for example, alkanet and rhubarb (Rekaby et al., 2009), red mangrove bark (Nakpathom et al., 2011), eucalyptus leaves and bark (Ellams et al., 2014), turmeric, madder, and rhubarb (Maamoun et al., 2014), catechu, turmeric, and marigold (Teli et al., 2014), annatto seed, manjistha root, and ratnajot bark (Chattopadhyay & Pan, 2019). In our earlier study, the printing pastes were prepared from an aqueous solution extracted from Camellia oleifera fruit shell with commercial thickener and binder and then screen printed on cotton fabric (Nakpathom et al., 2017). ...
Article
Natural colorant extracted from the fruit shell of Camellia oleifera was applied to PP spunbond nonwoven fabric by pigment printing method. The printing pastes containing natural dye, a thickener, an acrylate binder, and ferrous sulfate were applied to the substrate via flat screen technique. The printed fabrics were evaluated in terms of colorimetric measurements, color fastness properties as well as mechanical behaviors. The increase in color strength and the change in color hues from light brown to greyish black were observed by varying the amounts of dye, binder and ferrous sulfate. Increasing binder concentration led to an improvement in tensile strength and elongation in most cases, but had a negative impact on tear strength. The printed nonwoven possessed fair to moderate light fastness and fair to excellent crock fastness.
... Several studies on printing of different textile fabrics with natural dyes have been reported in different literature (Salem et al., 2013;Maamoun et al., 2014;Rekaby et al., 2009;Chattopadhyay and Pan, 2018). Polyester fabric can be printed with the extracts from different plants like turmeric (Curcuma longa), alkanet (A. ...
... tinctoria), and rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum) using natural and synthetic thickeners at various processing conditions of transfer printing, and satisfactory fastness properties can be achieved (Salem et al., 2013). Cotton/wool blended fabric printed with nanoparticles of turmeric, madder, and rhubarb was found to have excellent wash, rubbing, and perspiration fastness (Maamoun et al., 2014). Rekaby et al. (2009) applied different fixation techniques for cotton, wool, silk, and flax substrates printed with extracts of alkanet and rhubarb colorants. ...
Chapter
Until the middle of the nineteenth century, only natural colorants were used for textile colouration. After the advent of synthetic dyes, the use of declined drastically and today only a small fraction of textiles that commercially traded are coloured with natural dyes. However, there is a potentiality of increasing the use of natural colourants for textile applications. The natural dyes can be sourced from plants, insects and minerals. This chapter gives an overview of the classifications and examples of natural dyes and a brief synopsis of research and developments in textile colouration with them. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128035818116686
Article
Cotton fabric dyed with natural madder dye exhibits poor dyeing properties. Although mordant improves the dyeing property of cotton fabric, it changes the madder dye colour tonality (the hue angle). In this study, ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDE) was used as a crosslinking agent to dye cotton fabrics with natural madder dye and improve the surface colour depth (K/S) and colour fastness. The molecular structure, crystal structure and surface morphology of crosslinked dyed cotton were analysed using Fourier Transform–infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results showed that crosslinked dyed cotton fabric had two different ether bonds, and that crosslinked dyeing mainly occurred in the amorphous area. Compared with direct dyed cotton fabric, the hue angle (h°) of crosslinked dyed cotton fabric did not undergo an obvious change, K/S increased by 5, and the rubbing fastness, washing fastness and light fastness increased by 2-3 levels, indicating that the dyeing property of cotton fabric with natural madder dye could be improved by using EGDE as a crosslinking agent. Compared with raw cotton fabric, the bending length of crosslinked dyed cotton fabric was reduced by 2.28 cm, the wrinkle recovery angle increased by 80.7° and the ultraviolet protection factor value was more than 40, indicating that crosslinked dyed cotton fabric had great softness, wrinkle resistance and excellent ultraviolet resistance. In addition, the water contact angle of the cotton fabric only changed slightly after crosslinking dyeing, and the crosslinked dyed cotton fabric still had good hydrophilicity. Therefore, EGDE was a viable crosslinking agent for cotton fabric with madder dye.
Chapter
Biotechnology is expected to be a one stop solution for many problems associated with the production of many materials and products. The application of biotechnology in industry is termed as “white biotechnology” where enzymes and microorganisms are used as tools to replace hazardous materials and substances. The textile wet processing industry is vast and being accused for usage of huge quantities of water, chemicals and energy. Textile printing is a technique by which colours (dyes/pigments) are applied as specific patterns or designs on the fabric. Dyes need to be imparted to the textiles during colouration and the same dyes (unfixed) need to be removed from the waste water during effluent treatment. The use of enzymes in both fixation and removal of dyes have replaced many hazardous chemicals in a sustainable way. This chapter discusses the biotechnological approaches in textile printing.
Chapter
Natural dyes and pigments could be obtained from insects, plants, and animals. Natural dyes have been utilized in the dyeing of wool, cotton, and silk since the prehistoric ages. The first applications of natural dyes on textile fibers are estimated to have started in Mesopotamia and India in 4000 BC. In these first dyeing trials, it is thought that pigments were used for dyeing process and these pigments could be easily removed from fabrics by friction and washing because of their weak mechanical bonding onto the fibers, and therefore, dyeing process was not really successful. It is thought that mordant dyeing method may have been accidentally discovered. In many countries, such as India, Egypt, Anatolia, and China, many historical natural dyed fabrics were found. One of the first synthetic dyes, mauveine (also known as aniline purple), was accidentally synthesized by W.H. Perkin (at the age of 18) in 1856 during attempts to make quinine. The discovery of the first synthetic dye changed the natural dyeing habits and synthetic dyes replaced almost all natural dyes. However, it is known that the wastewater produced in the production steps of synthetic dyes and the chemicals used in the textile dyeing process can have toxic and pollutant effects on human and environmental health. Nowadays, the effects of environmental awareness, organic products, and the tendency toward healthy lifestyle also reflect on the textile sector. Disagreements on the risks of the usage of synthetic dyestuffs and increasing environmental awareness result in an enhanced interest in natural resources, environmentally friendly products, and new strategies. That is one of the reasons why the use of natural dyes came back to the agenda due to an increased ecological and sustainable awareness. Unlike non-renewable raw materials of synthetic dyes, natural dyes are mostly renewable and sustainable. Natural dye sources are agriculturally renewable sustainable vegetable-plant-based colorant sources. In terms of sustainability, synthetic dyes are produced from non-renewable resources; however, natural dyes are extracted from renewable sources. The ability to obtain the dye from renewable natural sources makes natural dyes an attractive dye class for more sustainable world. Natural dyes can be applied on the fibers not only with dyeing method but also with printing method. Textile printing is one of the most important and versatile methods among the methods used to design and colorize textile fabrics. Ancient men and women mixed the colorants such as coal or soil paint with oils and used them with their fingers in lines on various materials. The staining of the plant extracts and fabrics has provided different approaches. The patterns can be produced by the wax applications to provide resistant dye liquor, or the surrounding areas provide a tightly attached and reserved area. The word of print is referred to a process that uses pressure to impart colorant to the material. And there is no doubt that the first textile printing was occurred by the blocks with embossed printing surfaces, then these blocks were inked and printed on the fabric. Some of the first blocks were made of clay or terracotta, while others were made of carved wood. In this chapter, the information about various eco-friendly prints and different printing techniques which were applied to different kinds of fibers and fabrics using sustainable natural dyes and natural pigments are given in detail.