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Tasks in the cognitive battery

Tasks in the cognitive battery

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We report data from a proof-of-concept study involving the concurrent assessment of large-scale individual semantic networks and cognitive performance. The data include 10,800 free associations-collected using a dedicated web-based platform over the course of 2-4 weeks-and responses to several cognitive tasks, including verbal fluency, episodic mem...

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... correctly recalled between 32.8% and 96.8% of pairs. See also Table 1 for an overview of tasks included in the cognitive assessment in the MySWOW proof-of-concept study. ...

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