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TYPES OF HEIRLOOM ESSENCE AND REJUVENATIONS

TYPES OF HEIRLOOM ESSENCE AND REJUVENATIONS

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Article
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This study explores how heirlooms, usually regarded as objects of family identity and stability, can also become objects of evolving personal identities and change. Our approach is based on the role of materiality (as well as meanings) and multi-temporality in heirloom consumption. The data generated through interviews, visual sources, and media do...

Citations

... When combined with modern consumer research, including positivist and interpretive views, of how people value things (Zeithaml et al., 2020), we can envision perspectives of stewardship that individualize the meanings of things, consumer resources and practices for using and caring for them. In particular, possessions live dynamic lives that shift in and out of focus for people and gain and lose meanings over time (Türe & Ger, 2016). ...
... Individuals appropriate objects' public meaning based on their personal story, giving to the objects a private meaning and value according to the objects' relation to their identities (Mittal, 2006). Such meaning is (re) shaped based on individuals' experiences, often in ways that are radically different from previous ones (Türe & Ger, 2016). In our view, the more a possession's private meaning reflects or enhances individuals' identities, the more value it has for them. ...
Article
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This paper advances the conceptual understanding of consumption stewardship, defined here as a moral commitment to safeguard, nurture, and use consumption resources to create consumer value. We delineate consumption stewardship from related consumption variables and articulate its underlying assumptions, conceptual distinctiveness, and application areas. To create new theoretical and practical insights, the paper explores how consumption stewardship unfolds when a person enters into and lives in restricted consumption. A two-year qualitative study, which included observation, casual conversations, and interviews, was implemented. Findings illustrate the nature and trajectory of consumption stewardship across latent, vigilant, submissive and shared modes. Our conceptual development of consumption stewardship and empirical evidence of the homeless experiences makes two main contributions. First, we show how the demands of stewarding material objects operate as a powerful determinant for individual (re)valuation of various possessions. Second, we identify how consumption stewardship drives different ways of consumption for value seeking. Findings offer insights for debates in the marketplace about protecting one's possessions, policies around consumption adequacy, and social services’ role for addressing space related needs of vulnerable consumers.
... demonstrate that consumers' firsthand, subjective experiences of time are not merely the outcome of individual practice performance but relate to broader societal temporal logics. Consumer researchers further argue that studies exploring individual, subjective experiences of time hardly broach the overarching social and cultural dynamics within which they are embedded (Russell and Levy 2012;Türe and Ger 2016). Accordingly, time as a cultural consumption resource requires more scholarly attention. ...
... They argue that identity transitions caused by major life changes trigger consumers' self-reflexive reworking of past consumption experiences that likewise create new linkages across the three time orientations. Similarly, Türe and Ger (2016) uncover how consumers negotiate the past and the future in the present through creative heirloom consumption. They document the playful material work that heirs undertake to rejuvenate heirlooms in accordance with their current identity project, while being mindful of the special object's past zeitgeist value and potential future family set to inherit it next. ...
... Relevant research contexts include leaving close-knit religious groups and survivalist communities. Jacoby, Szybillo, and Berning's (1976) seminal call for conceptual and empirical considerations of time in consumer research resulted in a body of knowledge on individual time management (Feldman and Hornik 1981), cognitive schemata of time (Bergadaà 1990), embodied firsthand experiences of timeflow (Woermann and Rokka 2015), and, more recently, individual consumer engagement with the three orientations of time (past, present, and future) (Türe and Ger 2016). Yet time has remained peripheral to other core theoretical constructs within the field. ...
Article
This article unpacks time as a cultural consumption resource and introduces the concept of consumer timework. Consumer timework refers to marketplace stakeholders’ negotiation of competing interpretations of how the past and the future relate using a wide range of consumption objects and activities. Building on the theory of temporalization, we argue that social tensions, conflicts, and breaks drive the past and the future apart in multiple incompatible ways that individuals and societies must contend. We theorize four fundamental dynamics of consumer timework in which market stakeholders engage: integrative, disintegrative, subjugatory, and emancipatory. Integrative and disintegrative consumer timework respectively harmonize and rupture the multiple temporal orientations (past, present, and future) to create shared communities or counter-communities of time through consumption. Subjugatory and emancipatory consumer timework respectively enforce and disrupt temporal hierarchies of power through consumption. We delineate these temporal dynamics using examples from extant consumer research. We conclude by establishing a future research agenda on consumer timework.
... Regarding units of analysis, families were the most popular in the third wave (Chitakunye & Maclaran, 2014;Epp & Price, 2008, 2010Hand & Shove, 2007;McCabe and Malefyt 2015;Money, 2007;Türe & Ger, 2016). Some communities were also investigated and, recently, Rulikova (2020) delivered an excellent contribution with a macrolevel investigation, following the biography of secondhand clothing in a post-socialist country. ...
Article
The process of commoditization-singularization, as developed by Kopytoff, is a compelling concept for understanding market exchange, and has been explored predominantly by scholars of consumer culture theoretics. The concept allows us to examine complex interactions between people, objects, and the dynamics of a market, and the literature based on it has illuminated the intricate tensions and contradictions within and between spheres of exchange. The use of the concept, however , is not without problems since some studies have applied dualistic or simplistic versions of it. This paper illustrates the current state of affairs by revisiting Kopytoff's seminal work and analyzing the marketing and consumer research literature that derives from it, thus demonstrating how the conceptualization has evolved over time. In an attempt to overcome the dualist approach and further explore this topic, I propose a multidimensional perspective of spheres of exchange, offering an alternative approach for investigating the commoditization-singularization process.
... Organizational sustainability has been equated with the preservation of tradition. As a result, there is a strong belief that what existed in the past must be continued in the future because eliminating or changing traditions means changing the meaning of the organization (Türe & Ger, 2016). Yet, innovation means change, which implies discontinuation from the past. ...
Article
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Idea sharing is one of the most common ways of developing innovation in organizations. Aspirations and suggestions for improvements are recognized, discussed, and executed through idea sharing. This study adopts an ethnographic approach and critically analyzes how idea sharing goes against the grain of organizational culture. Based on a study of a higher education institution in Java, Indonesia, the paper highlights usul mikul and ketiban sampur as two modes of cultural practice which, over time, penalize innovators in their efforts to initiate change and renewal. The results show that these practices are formative to organizational atrophy. They weaken organizational capability to innovate due to the disuse of members' capabilities. Importantly, the study contributes to the growing literature on innovation management, organizational culture, and higher education management.
... We move, relocate, and experience new spatial relationalities, and our needs, habits, and preferences change. The social, individual, and material dimensions of personal biographies are involved in a continuous process of becoming rather than being merely shaped by identity projects (Türe and Ger 2016). Even when people's lives proceed immutably and stably, modifications and discontinuities may occur in commercial locations (Eroglu and Michel 2018). ...
... Affordance theory illuminates how individual-space relationships-and thus place attachment-are not stable, but can change over time as they vary across life courses. In a process of becoming (Türe and Ger 2016), the biography of consumers intertwines with the set of evolving spatial feelings of spaces (Schmitz 2005) and continuously recreates meanings. ...
... Caterina thus regarded her voluntary detachments from her favorite commercial spots as a form of rebirth. She looked back and saw these places as elements of herself that helped her grow; they were pieces of her biographical journey that no longer fit her, an evolution for her becoming (Türe and Ger 2016). Starting a new relationship and the associated attachment with the new space was essential for Caterina. ...
Article
Like homes, neighborhoods, and cities, retail locations offer significant opportunities for attachment far from domestic spheres. In commercial settings, consumers construct personal geographies, and find stable references for their lives. Our work advances previous consumer research by showing how these relationalities are situated, implicitly unstable and often impermanent. Individuals attach to commercial spaces in multiple ways, through both immediate and slow processes. We theorize that multiple affordances of spaces – whether sensual, symbolic, or cerebral– trigger meaningful ties, stimulate new affective and practice repertoires and may exert a transformative power in personal biographies. Bonds evolve in tandem with individuals’ life courses and are also impacted by events beyond consumers’ control, such as store closures. Whether disruptive or constructive, detachments can precipitate constructive change, allowing individuals to mobilize the emotional and cognitive resources at the base of their affective bond with treasured places, and redirect these assets more effectively. Forced and voluntary detachment from retail spaces are thus interpreted as integral and complementary components of attachment.
... Finally, consumers even assign identity value to their possessions through the practice of storage. For example, through curatorial practices, such as collecting [37,38], cherishing family heirlooms [39][40][41] and hoarding [35], consumers cultivate a symbolic connection with their histories, values, and relationships, forging emotional attachment to their possessions and imbuing them with identity value. In all these practices, storage is paramount to the classification of the curated items as valuable extensions of consumers' identity. ...
Article
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Consumers across the globe tend to store their small electronic devices when they reach their end of life instead of disposing of them. This is a problem because if end-of-life devices are not recovered from consumers’ homes, the devices cannot be re-used or recycled, leading to increased production. We study what motivates consumers to store their end-of-life devices by looking at how storage creates consumer value. Applying a practice-based understanding of value, we find that storage is a social practice that generates value by protecting consumers from four different kinds of risk: practical risks, existential risks, environmental risks, and moral risks. Storage gives consumers a sense of security in their everyday lives and thus generates what we call ‘security value’. This notion implies that even though end-of-life devices sit idle in consumers’ homes, their value generating capacity remains active. The findings have implications for the role of consumers in reverse logistics strategies for sustainable systems.
... However, while the literature prominently describes how object transformations change local traditions along the time, cultural processes in which objects reinforce local tradition are misunderstood. In one of the few exceptions, Türe and Ger (2016) study how objects representing a family's identity and tradition preserve their essence for generations, recognizing that the market can help to authenticate traditional objects rather than destroy their authenticity. ...
... This process is well identified in gaucho culture, where southern Brazilian inhabits demonstrated a valuation of local traditions as a pillar in the identity construction (Oliven, 2006). This leads us to suppose that even in the face of change, fashionas well as other cultural goods (Türe & Ger, 2016)preserves its ability to transmit cultural meanings, helping the representation of belonging and local tradition. Next, we explore these theoretical reflections in empirical terms. ...
... However, the interviewee herself acknowledges that, at the same time, there is a need to create new things and to adapt. Otherwise, in line with the findings of Türe and Ger (2016), objects will lose their meaning and fall out of use or become unworkable. An example Clarice provided is the need for constant updating of the fabrics used to make the clothes, once changes in the textile industry require new fabrics to be incorporated at the risk of no longer being available. ...
Article
Fashion inspired by local culture references is our starting point for understanding how fashion, as a contemporary and dynamic dimension, can preserve the capacity of representing and maintaining local traditions. Through an interpretive approach, we look at the relationship between traditional clothing preservation and the creation of a contemporary fashion associated with the gaucho traditionalist culture in southern Brazil. The study counts on 22 in-depth interviews with consumers and producers of the traditional and contemporary gaucho fashion movement, as well as document analysis and netnographic data exploration on gaucho traditions. Results indicate that even facing the resistance from conservative groups that aim to keep clothing stable over time, fashion producers and consumers associated the contemporary gaucho clothes as a modern mechanism for tradition preservation. It allows the adjustment of tradition representation in line with changes in social roles, especially gender patterns. Findings reveal that contemporary gaucho fashion challenges the rigid conception of tradition, once it represents a democratic instrument able to supply a sense of belonging adjusted to contemporary time. Finally, we theorize about the ability of symbolic representations of a particular culture to be transferred to emerging fashion elements over time, without losing the bond with the local tradition. 通过时尚消费保护传统:巴西南部加乌乔传统文化的 当代服饰 近期, 有关市场营销方面的研究主要关注地方传统被瞬时性, 全球 性和市场调节这类价值观念取代后出现的一些转变和误导现象°却 鲜有研究对加强地方传统和增强现代消费归属感这两种截然相 反的行为进行分析°为补充并推进关于这一主题的研究, 我们对时 尚领域进行了研究 (包括服装所需的衣服, 饰物和标志及其在社会 群体内外所涵盖的意义), 借此分析商品能力, 即能够体现更为广泛 的社会群体 (如拥有相同社会和文化特点的地区或民族) 的地方传 ARTICLE HISTORY
... They recognize that consumers and objects connect interactively, and objects can enable or constrain the consumers' experience. In this sense, such emerging object-oriented perspectives on consumer research have made clear the role of materiality in the consumption experience (Türe and Ger 2016). ...
... freeskier), they argue that a bystander will live through a different temporality and coexist with different body conduct, norms, and goals that material elements shape. Türe and Ger (2016) also identify a processual interaction on multiple levels of coexistence, between a consumer and heirloom objects. Following their description of the object transformation over time, objects' interaction predicts, routinizes, and configures the sociomateriality of practices. ...
... Like the emperor wearing nothing, the materiality keeps affecting the experience, even in its absence, supported by the imagining of what is expected in that experiential situation. Reinforcing the comprehension that material objects can display agency (Hoffman and Novak 2018;Goulding, Saren, and Pressey 2018;Türe and Ger 2016), the cosplayless experience shows how absent objects also have a role in creating experiences, preserving agentic capacity to stimulate experience. ...
Article
Experiences are not limited to the apparent. Something absent can invade one’s perception of the world and become heavier and more forceful than what is present. Absent material can feel imposing, even commanding and restricting the consumer’s interaction with the world. In this study, we investigated the cosplayers – consumers at geek conventions who voluntarily dress as a fictional character, to have a theatrical experience – and their experience consuming the same themed marketplace stage without its core material. To these consumers, the experience is mainly one of absence, with the absent cosplay making itself present to remind them that they cannot use the convention as a stage, a conflicting experience of free and disengaged anonymity.
... While the term curatorial consumption has been used in prior consumer research to describe the preservation of heirlooms and their meanings (McCracken, 1988a), it has not been developed beyond the family context (Curasi et al., 2004). This reflects a significant gap in understanding, given the role of the past in shaping person-object relations (Curasi et al., 2004;Türe & Ger, 2016). Furthermore, the role that the circulation of objects plays in shaping personobject relations also remains understudied. ...
... Exceptions to this omission exist in research focused on family possessions. Türe and Ger (2016) identify how consumers modify their heirlooms in ways that reflect their tastes and identities, while maintaining a link with the family past and potentially acquiring new stories and memories, to pass on alongside objects in the future. Epp and Price (2010), use the example of a seemingly mundane object, a table, to identify how the item embodied memories and is key to how families construct their collective identity. ...
Article
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The role of objects’ histories in shaping consumers’ relationships with them has received limited attention outside the family setting. This paper proposes a wider view of curation within consumer research, one which moves beyond possessions’ mnemonic links and also incorporates the consuming and selling of old objects within the marketplace. Drawing on in-depth object interviews with 28 vintage enthusiasts, we shed light on how material remnants of the past are preserved in contemporary consumer culture. We identify how old objects’ circulation and their actual and imagined historical associations shape consumer-object relations and associated meanings. We contribute to existing knowledge regarding consumers’ relationships with their possessions by developing a conceptualization of curatorial consumption. Curatorial consumption is a dynamic process, whereby facets of the past are acquired, interpreted, preserved and transmitted to others.
... Seria a nostalgia relacionada a esse objeto dormente fonte potencial de sua agência? Türe & Ger (2016) também demonstraram como heranças desempenham um importante papel nas noções de continuidade e mudança e como as práticas de rejuvenescimento das relíquias ajudam o herdeiro a navegar em seus imaginários do passado, presente e futuro. Tais práticas de rejuvenescimento buscam, de certa forma, reincorporar as relíquias (percebidas como passado) nas práticas presentes de materialidade em que o herdeiro está envolvido. ...
Conference Paper
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A história da nostalgia demonstra que o fenômeno primeiramente considerado no domínio da medicina como uma patologia passou a ser interpretado como um sentimento na era industrial pelas ciências sociais. Na era pós-industrial, novas percepções sobre tempo e espaço se constroem a partir da expansão do sistema de marketing e da tecnologia. No campo do marketing, contudo, a interpretação moderna da nostalgia como um sentimento continua sendo adotada de modo praticamente hegemônico, como se o fenômeno nostálgico continuasse com as características da era industrial. O objetivo deste ensaio é discutir o fenômeno da nostalgia sob uma perspectiva cultural e histórica, bem como propor uma agenda de pesquisa em comportamento do consumidor que leve em consideração suas premissas. O interesse do campo do marketing pelo fenômeno da nostalgia parece ter surgido por volta dos anos de 1990. Questões relacionadas à influência da nostalgia nas preferências do consumidor (Holbrook & Schindler, 1996), aos tipos de respostas a estímulos publicitários nostálgicos (Stern, 1992) e como a nostalgia associada aos objetos cria um senso de identidade do consumidor (Belk, 1990; 1991) começaram a figurar entre os interesses de pesquisadores de comportamento do consumidor. A noção de que a nostalgia é um sentimento de perda que mistura prazer e dor predomina em tais estudos. Estudos recentes vem apresentando evidências de que a evolução tecnológica e o avanço do sistema de marketing têm modificado o modo como o consumidor se relaciona com o passado, de modo que o sentimento de perda e o confronto passado versus presente cede lugar a uma apreciação estética de elementos do passado no presente, dando origem a categorias como o "vintage" e o "retrô" (Higson, 2014; Cross, 2017). Se o modo como o consumidor experimenta o passado por meio do consumo vem mudando, novas abordagens teóricas e metodológicas se fazem necessárias para a revisão das premissas cristalizadas no campo a respeito da relação entre consumo e nostalgia.