Fig 2 - uploaded by Maria Riveiro
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Swing positions. The various illustrations show the golf swing sequence: set-up position (P1), club parallel to ground (P2), left arm parallel to ground (P3), top of the backswing (P4), left arm parallel to ground (P5), club shaft parallel to ground (P6), impact (P7), club shaft parallel to ground on through swing (P8), right arm parallel to ground on through swing (P9) and finish position (P10). 

Swing positions. The various illustrations show the golf swing sequence: set-up position (P1), club parallel to ground (P2), left arm parallel to ground (P3), top of the backswing (P4), left arm parallel to ground (P5), club shaft parallel to ground (P6), impact (P7), club shaft parallel to ground on through swing (P8), right arm parallel to ground on through swing (P9) and finish position (P10). 

Context in source publication

Context 1
... et al. [3] focus their analysis on the wrist movement while performing a swing. The authors describe an autonomous kinematic analysis platform, using the Microsoft Kinect camera system 1 , for wrist angle measurement that is capa- ble of evaluating a user's uncocking swing motion (i.e. downswing, see Fig. 2) and providing instructional feedback. According to the authors, the graphical user interface (GUI) provides five types of intuitive feedback: (1) verbal and (2) textual instructions for improving the user's uncocking motion based on the feedback comments and scores defined in a special module embedded in the platform (the generation ...

Citations

... However, utilizing these techniques in a real-time learning environment without historical traces of new students raise some issues like the cold-start problem [2,3]. In [2,4] authors present a hybrid technique using the ontological domain representation for adaptive learning to avoid these disadvantages. However, it is also based on the student's historical parameters such as schooling, learning, and proficiency level. ...
... The expression (4) shows that the performance of the student depends on receiving rewards of the recommended task which is further used to motivate as well as increase the learning proficiency. Therefore, (4) shows that a student can get progress only if he gives the correct answer to the difficult task rather than his previous estimated competency level. ...
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