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Survival curves in matched subgroup of patients without treatment limitation

Survival curves in matched subgroup of patients without treatment limitation

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Purpose: The number of patients ≥ 80 years admitted into critical care is increasing. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) added another challenge for clinical decisions for both admission and limitation of life-sustaining treatments (LLST). We aimed to compare the characteristics and mortality of very old critically ill patients with or without CO...

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Context 1
... timing of LST was similar in both cohorts but the delay between withholding treatment and death was longer among COVID patients. In the subgroup analysis of patients without treatment limitation among 392 COVID patients, 152 could be matched to 230 non-COVID patients. Survival was also lower in the COVID patients (Fig. 3) 62% (95%CI 55-71) at day 30 compared to 79% (95%CI 74-85) in non-COVID patients. In the subgroup analysis of patients receiving respiratory support among 374 COVID patients, 195 could be matched to 291 non-COVID patients. Survival was still much lower in the COVID patients (SEM ...
Context 2
... intensivists would have to work under considerable pressure to increase bed availability [27,37]. However, in the matched analysis including patients without any limitation of LST, the survival was still lower among COVID patients suggesting that COVID per se carried a higher risk of mortality compared to other causes of acute respiratory failure (Fig. ...

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