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Summary table of included energy healing interventions

Summary table of included energy healing interventions

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Background: Emerging evidence suggests that some people living with non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have integrated energy healing into their self-management strategy, however little is known about its efficacy. Purpose: To identify energy healing interventions that impacted positively on the symptom management outcomes for patients living in t...

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... study) and diabetes (n= 207; 1 study) ( Table 1). ...

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... Numerous experiments demonstrate the significant positive effects found when people direct positive healing intention at humans, animals, plants, and cells (Roe et al., 2015). Energy medicine modalities, like Therapeutic Touch and Reiki, are also encompassed in this factor and have increasing objective evidence for their beneficial effects on conditions like pain, cancer, mental health symptoms, and hypertension (Jain et al., 2015;Rao et al., 2016;Yount et al., 2021). While the effects of distant intention are often small (0.10-0.25), considering that the effect should be zero, these results are intriguing. ...
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Noetic comes from the Greek word noēsis, meaning inner wisdom or direct knowing. Noetic experiences often transcend the perception of our five senses and are ubiquitous worldwide, although no instrument exists to evaluate noetic characteristics both within and between individuals. We developed the Noetic Signature Inventory (NSI) through an iterative qualitative and statistical process as a tool to subjectively assess noetic characteristics. Study 1 developed and evaluated a 175-item NSI using 521 self-selected research participants, resulting in a 46-item NSI with an 11-factor model solution. Study 2 examined the 11-factor solution, construct validity, and test–retest reliability, resulting in a 44-item NSI with a 12-factor model solution. Study 3 confirmed the final 44-item NSI in a diverse population. The 12-factors were: (1) Inner Knowing, (2) Embodied Sensations, (3) Visualizing to Access or Affect, (4) Inner Knowing Through Touch, (5) Healing, (6) Knowing the Future, (7) Physical Sensations from Other People, (8) Knowing Yourself, (9) Knowing Other’s Minds, (10) Apparent Communication with Non-physical Beings, (11) Knowing Through Dreams, and (12) Inner Voice. The NSI demonstrated internal consistency, convergent and divergent content validity, and test–retest reliability. The NSI can be used for the future studies to evaluate intra- and inter-individual variation of noetic experiences.
... Finally, a large scale study of Reiki clients found improvements in positive affect, negative affect, pain, drowsiness, tiredness, nausea, appetite, shortness of breath, anxiety, depression, and overall well-being [22]. However, some reviews have concluded there is insufficient evidence to support Reiki as beneficial in anxiety or depression [23] or that its efficacy is inconclusive due to the quality of research designs [24,25]. ...
... A recent study found distant reiki was associated with significant improvements in stress, anxiety, pain, and wellbeing (but not sleep quality) in healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic [28]. A review of hands on and distant Reiki found significant improvements in perceived stress in some studies on distant Reiki, but overall inconclusive efficacy due to the quality of research designs [25]. ...
... Practitioners perceived distant Reiki as similarly effective to hands on Reiki. Although there is some support, it is not clear if this perception is correct as the evidence on the efficacy of distant Reiki appears to be equivocal [25][26][27][28]. ...
Article
Objectives This study examined the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the experience, practice and future of Reiki in the UK, including the personal impact of the pandemic on practitioners and their work, practitioner perceptions of the future of the profession and Reiki delivery, and practitioner experiences and views of distant Reiki in comparison to hands on or near the body treatments. Method A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was carried out with 10 Reiki practitioners. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Results Three themes were identified: adapting and growing with the challenges of COVID-19, Reiki for individual and community resilience, and moving from the mainstream hands on to lesser known distant Reiki. Conclusion While the COVID-19 pandemic personally impacted Reiki practitioners, they focused on turning adversity into opportunity to overcome a sense of disconnectedness and social isolation by providing social support and promoting individual and community resilience. Practitioners focused on self-care, personal development and reaching out to the community. Personal Protective Equipment was perceived as necessary for infection control but a potential barrier to the client's experience of Reiki. They saw value in adapting their practice as part of the future of the profession by utilising new technology and distant Reiki healing, but were clear this could not replace in person contact.
... Numerous experiments where positive intention is directed at humans, animals, plants, and cells, have found small but significant positive results (Roe et al., 2015). Energy medicine techniques such as Therapeutic Touch and Reiki have also been shown to positively affect conditions like pain, cancer, mental health symptoms, and hypertension (Jain et al., 2015;Rao et al., 2016;Yount et al., 2021). Extraordinary case studies of spontaneous remissions have also been noted (O'Regan & Hirshberg, 1993). ...
Article
The term “noetic” comes from the Greek word noēsis/noētikos that means inner wisdom, direct knowing, intuition, or implicit understanding. Strong cultural taboos exist about sharing these experiences. Thus, many may not feel comfortable transparently discussing or researching these topics, despite growing evidence that these experiences may be real. The study’s objective was to qualitatively evaluate first-hand accounts of noetic experiences. 521 English-speaking adults from around the world completed an online survey that collected demographic data and four open-ended questions about noetic experiences. Thematic analysis was used to characterize the data. The ten most used codes were expressing to or sharing with others, impacting decision-making, intuition/”just knowing,” meditation/hypnosis, inner visions, setting intentions/getting into the “state,” healing others, writing for self, and inner voice. There were five main themes identified: 1. Ways of Engagement; 2. Ways of Knowing; 3. Types of Information; 4. Ways of Affecting; and 5. Ways of Expressing. Subthemes. Future research will include investigating the nuances of these themes and also establishing standardized methods for evaluating them. This would also then inform curricula and therapies to support people in these experiences.
... The Informational Manual Therapy (IMT), also known to as Poyet-Pialoux method, is a therapeutic touch [1] using a whole-body approach with light touch. IMT harmonizes the human body through the natural connection of a cranial-pelvic fascial system. ...
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Background: The Informational Manual Therapy (IMT) is a therapeutic touch. This study aims to assess the effect of IMT on quiet standing, pain and health status in university population. Methods: An experiment was conducted on subjects utilizing a comparative paired analysis both before and after the intervention. One IMT session was performed on 57 healthy individuals aged from 18 to 65 years. The primary outcome was quiet standing assessed by the Satel 40 Hz stabilometric force platform. Secondary outcomes were bodily pain assessed by the 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36) and health status by EQ-5D-3L. The primary outcome was evaluated before and immediately after treatment. Results: The individuals were divided into 3 age groups, 18-35 (52.6%), 35-50 (29.8%) and 51-65 (17.6%). Statistically significant differences were immediately observed after the session ended when comparing the pre-post quiet stance scores in a number of length parameters: L, Lx, Ly and stabilometry amplitude on Y-axis with eyes open and closed. Significant differences were also found when testing bodily pain (SF-36) and anxiety (5Q-5D-3L). Conclusion: One session of IMT produced positive effects when testing quiet standing with eyes open and eyes closed, as well as a significant reduction in pain and anxiety for those tested. Further research is suggested.
... Numerous experiments where positive intention is directed at humans, animals, plants, and cells, have found small but significant positive results (Roe, Sonnex, and Roxburgh 2015). Energy medicine techniques such as Therapeutic Touch and Reiki have also been shown to positively affect conditions like pain, cancer, mental health symptoms, and hypertension (Jain et al. 2015;Rao et al. 2016;Yount et al. 2021). Extraordinary case studies of spontaneous remissions have also been noted (O'Regan and Hirshberg 1993). ...
... Numerous experiments where positive intention is directed at humans, animals, plants, and cells, have found small but signi cant positive results (Roe, Sonnex, and Roxburgh 2015). Energy medicine techniques such as Therapeutic Touch and Reiki have also been shown to positively affect conditions like pain, cancer, mental health symptoms, and hypertension (Jain et al. 2015;Rao et al. 2016;Yount et al. 2021 Mind-matter interactions have also been rigorously studied in the laboratory, where people have directed their intention to a random system and produced effects (Schmidt 1974;Varvoglis and Bancel 2015;Jahn et al. 2007;Dunne and Jahn 1992;Bosch, Steinkamp, and Boller 2006;Radin et al. 2006). We can also see these effects in eld-experiments (Nelson 1997;Nelson et al. 1996;Radin 2018) and global experiments of indirect intention effects (Nelson 2015). ...
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The term “noetic” comes from the Greek word noēsis/noētikos that means inner wisdom, direct knowing, intuition, or implicit understanding. Strong cultural taboo exist about sharing these experiences. Thus, many may not feel comfortable transparently discussing or researching these topics, despite growing evidence that these experiences may be real. The study’s objective was to qualitatively evaluate first-hand accounts of noetic experiences. 521 English-speaking adults from around the world completed an online survey collected demographic data and four open-ended questions about noetic experiences. Thematic analysis was used to characterize the data. The ten most used codes were expressing to or sharing with others, impacts decision making, intuition/”just knowing,” meditation/hypnosis, inner visions, setting intentions/getting into the “state,” healing others, writing for self, and inner voice. There were five main themes identified: 1. Ways of Engagement; 2. Ways of Knowing; 3. Types of Information; 4. Ways of Affecting; and 5. Ways of Expressing. Subthemes. Future research will include investigating the nuances of these themes and also establishing standardized methods for evaluating them. This would also then inform curricula and therapies to support people in these experiences.
... The whole-human studies had a combined effect size of 0.203 and when the 17 higher quality studies were included the effect size increased to 0.224. While these effects sizes correspond to weak to moderate effects, the results are still remarkable considering that we would expect the effect of non-contact healing to be 0. Rao and colleagues conducted a systematic review of 27 studies with 3159 participants focusing more on modalities and pathologies [9]. Of those 27 studies, 13 had statistically significant positive findings. ...
... (13) Energy healing is the "channeling of healing energy through the hands of a practitioner into the client's body to restore a normal energy balance and, therefore, health." (14) HT practitioners may use light, gentle touch, sweeping hand motions with their hands near the body or both to restore and balance energy interrupted by physical and emotional stressors. (15) It has demonstrated ability to improve health-related quality-of-life and reduce respiratory rate, heart rate, blood pressure, pain, mood disturbances, and fatigue. ...
Article
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Background: Healing Touch (HT) and Oncology Massage (OM) are nonpharmacologic pain interventions, yet a comparative effectiveness study has not been conducted for pain in breast cancer. Purpose: This breast cancer subgroup analysis compared the effectiveness of HT vs. OM on pain. Setting: The research occurred at an outpatient setting at an academic hybrid, multi-site, community-based cancer institute and Department of Supportive Oncology across four regional locations. Participants: Breast cancer outpatients along the cancer continuum who experienced routine clinical, nonexperimentally manipulated HT or OM. Research design: The study was an observational, retrospective, comparative effectiveness post hoc subanalysis of a larger dataset. Patients reporting pain < 2 were excluded. Pre- and posttherapy pain scores and differences were calculated. Logistic regression modeled posttherapy pain by modality, adjusting for pretherapy pain. The proportions experiencing ≥ 2-point (clinically significant) pain reduction were compared with chi-square tests. Intervention: The study focused on the first session of either HT or OM. Main outcome measures: Pre- and posttherapy pain (range: 0 = no pain to 10 = worst possible pain). Results: A total of 407 patients reported pre- and posttherapy pain scores, comprised of 233 (57.3%) who received HT and 174 (42.8%) who received OM. Pretherapy mean pain was higher in HT (M=5.1, ± 2.3) than OM (M=4.3, ± 2.1) (p < .001); posttherapy mean pain remained higher in HT (M=2.7, ± 2.2) than OM (M=1.9, ± 1.7) (p < .001). Mean difference in pain reduction was 2.4 for both HT and OM. Both HT (p < .001) and OM (p < .001) were associated with reduced pain. Proportions of clinically significant pain reduction were similar (65.7% HT and 69.0% OM, p = .483). Modality was not associated with pain improvement (p = .072). Conclusions: Both HT and OM were associated with clinically significant pain improvement. Future research should explore attitudes toward the modalities and potential influence of cancer stage and treatment status on modality self-selection.
... Massage interventions might be beneficial on several levels. They may reduce pain-related sensations but also improve people's quality of life [12][13][14][15]. Clinically significant benefits of massage have been suggested in various chronic pain problems: back pain [16,17], neck pain [16], knee arthralgia [16][17][18], but also fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, headaches, migraines or arthritis [15][16][17][18] and cancer [13,19]. ...
... They may reduce pain-related sensations but also improve people's quality of life [12][13][14][15]. Clinically significant benefits of massage have been suggested in various chronic pain problems: back pain [16,17], neck pain [16], knee arthralgia [16][17][18], but also fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, headaches, migraines or arthritis [15][16][17][18] and cancer [13,19]. ...
... In addition to reducing the pain sensation, people who have received massages describe a lasting improvement and further benefit on sleep quality (20), relaxation and sense of well-being. An increased sense of energy [21], a reduction in anxiety [13,[22][23][24] and the experience of increased self-confidence have also been documented [23]. Stress decreases significantly with touch massage [14,25] insofar as biophysical factors such as stress hormones, blood pressure or other cardiac outcomes are reduced [24]. ...
Article
Background and purpose: Chronic pain is a major public health problem. It affects the quality of life of many patients and their families and compromises physical and social functioning and psychological well-being. Non-pharmacological interventions are increasingly being used as a complement to chronic pain care. One of these interventions is Touch massage (TM) that can provide relaxation, comfort and well-being. In addition to its various physiological functions, TM can be used as a social communication tool. Materials and methods This is a cluster study with an exploratory qualitative part. Two groups will be considered: the experimental group will benefit from a TM delivered by trained members of care team and the control group will benefit from an intervention of the same duration with a foot massage device. At least 4 sessions will be delivered and spread over two weeks. Sample size calculation showed that 78 participants (39 per group) need to be included. As for the qualitative part, semi-structured interviews will be conducted to investigate the patients’ perception of the intervention; focus groups will explore the satisfaction and general perception of the health care teams. Expected results Incorporating TM interventions into care planning could bring benefits in supporting patients suffering from chronic pain. TM is expected to increase the patients’ feelings that their pain is seriously considered; physical and psychological support should help improve their sense of comfort and well-being and hence their quality of life. This practice might thus improve the caregiver-patient relationship with TM as a providing a new means of establishing communication through touch. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04295603, Registered on 4 March 2020.
... Reviews of clinical trials testing energy healing for various diseases suggest that therapeutic potential that may be more readily demonstrated with improved study designs, for example, focusing on targeted outcomes or clarifying methods used for the intervention, among others. 3 We have developed a method to record magnetic and electromagnetic signals associated with energy healing, then play back that recording to test if it mimics the effect of a live healer. The energy healing technique we have focused on is the Bengston Healing Method (BHM), a technique developed in the early 1970s. ...
Article
Full-text available
Energy healing is a therapy said to manipulate and balance the flow of “energies” in the body. One such technique, the Bengston Healing Method (BHM), has shown some success in healing malignant tumors in animals and humans, but the mechanism of action and factors influencing therapeutic success of this method are poorly understood. In this study, we tested in vivo the antitumor potential of magnetic signals recorded during BHM healing. Balb/c mice engrafted with 4T1 breast cancer cells were exposed to this recording for 4 h/d on a weekly or daily basis for 28 days; control mice were not exposed at all. Tumors showed a trend to grow slower in the treatment versus control group during the fourth week of treatment. Elevated leukocyte counts, associated with an increase in blood levels of granulocyte–macrophage colony stimulating factor and interleukin-6, were observed in tumor-bearing mice exposed to the BHM recording but not in healthy animals exposed to the recording. This suggests that exposure to a recording of BHM may induce a biological response in tumor-bearing mice, but limited effects on tumor growth when observed within the predefined end point of 28 days. Studies involving longer end points are recommended to observe the progression of tumor growth.