Summary statistics.

Summary statistics.

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
This paper studies whether sibling gender affects personality traits. We use the idea that if parents decide to have a second child, it is random whether they will have a boy or a girl. Therefore, the relationship between the second-born sibling's gender and the first sibling's personality traits is causal. We employ longitudinal data from a large...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... total, 12 surveys have been conducted over this timespan. 3 Table 1 gives summary statistics on the main variables for the full sample and for the sample used in our analyses. ...
Context 2
... use these answers to elicit whether the child was the oldest child in the household and to determine the number of siblings in the household. Table 1 shows that the average household consisted of 2.2 children including the surveyed child itself. ...
Context 3
... a second step, we elicit each trait by extracting the first principal component from the set of items belonging to that trait. As shown in Table 1, we then standardize these principle components to a mean of zero and a standard deviation of one based on the full sample. We do so in order to facilitate the interpretation of the size of the effects in our regression analyses. ...
Context 4
... do so in order to facilitate the interpretation of the size of the effects in our regression analyses. Comparing the number of observations on our personality trait variables in Table 1 also reveals the attrition in the data. At age 10, around 80 percent of the original sample of children is still in the sample. ...
Context 5
... our regressions, we control for whether the mother was married at the time when the child was born. Table 1 shows that around 93 percent of the mothers were married at that time. In the regressions, we include a dummy variable for whether the mother was married. ...
Context 6
... are potentially important indicators of the environment in which the child is raised. Tables A1 and A2 display a list of occupations related to each social class. In our analyses, we include separate dummies for each social class. ...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
Objetivo Esta pesquisa procurou analisar o efeito da mentalidade paradoxal como mediador da relação entre experimentação do estresse com satisfação na carreira e satisfação com a vida. Originalidade/valor O presente estudo permitiu realizar três avanços principais na literatura de paradoxo e satisfação com a carreira. Primeiro, contribuiu analisan...

Citations

... Researchers now have the possibility to draw on large and nationally representative panel studies. For example, Golsteyn and Magnée (2020) made use of data from the British Cohort Study, which provides a representative picture of the British population born around 1970. Mothers rated their children's personality at both age 10 and age 16 on a number of adjectives which could be mapped onto the Big Five personality traits conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and emotional stability. ...
Article
Full-text available
Does growing up with a sister rather than a brother affect personality? In this paper, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the effects of siblings’ gender on adults’ personality, using data from 85,887 people from 12 large representative surveys covering 9 countries (the United States, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Australia, Mexico, China, and Indonesia). We investigated the personality traits risk tolerance, trust, patience, locus of control, and the Big Five. We found no meaningful causal effects of the gender of the next younger sibling, and no associations with the gender of the next older sibling. Based on high statistical power and consistent results in the overall sample and relevant subsamples, our results suggest that siblings’ gender does not systematically affect personality.
... For instance, a study by Dixon et al. (2008) suggested that in families with more than six children, the youngest three children were significantly more extroverted than the oldest. According to Golsteyn and Magnée (2020), older brothers were more agreeable when having a younger sister, as opposed to a younger brother. Bleske-Rechek and Kelley (2014), on their part, did not find birth order having an enduring effect on personality traits. ...
Article
Full-text available
Although siblings may differ considerably, the similarities between them are often an important source of emotional support in one's life and influence one's life course trajectories. In this review on the topic of sibling relationship and cross‐sibling effect interactions, we aim to encourage research interest and facilitate knowledge building. We begin our review by highlighting how the parental home may induce differentiation between siblings. Next, we illustrate the theories explaining sibling similarities and differences and discuss the factors that stimulate these. Throughout the review, we do not only highlight the complex mechanisms by which siblings imitate yet differentiate themselves, but also mutually relate to their life courses and education. New understandings of how similarities between siblings can simultaneously act as powerful influences and negative examples are provided.
... The pioneering studies focusing on children in toddlerhood (Brim, 1958;Koch, 1955) reported more gender-typical behaviour (e.g., gender-typical interests and play behaviour) (Su et al., 2009;Todd et al., 2018) in the presence of a same-sex sibling, such that children with a same-sex sibling exhibited more traditionally gender-typical behaviour than those with a sibling of the opposite sex. However, results from subsequent studies examining the relationship between sibship compositions and gender-typical behaviour have been mixed (Golsteyn and Magnée, 2020;Grotevant, 1978;Peter et al., 2018). Critically, research specifically examining whether early sibship composition influences one's cognitive strengths and career choices is lacking. ...
Article
Full-text available
Are we affected by growing up in either female or male environment? This study examined whether girls’ and boys’ academic strengths at age 16 in verbal/language school subjects, relative to technical/numerical subjects, and cognitive demands of a chosen occupation at age 35 are influenced by having same- or opposite-sex siblings. Using representative population data from Swedish registers, we extracted (Study 1) 3-sibling families (N = 17,233), focusing on the mid-born, and (Study 2) 2-sibling families (N = 118,688), focusing on the last-born child. Both studies demonstrated that individuals’ academic strengths were unaffected by sibship composition. Study 2 showed that boys with a sister tended to choose more numerically demanding occupations as compared to boys with a brother. Taken together, growing up in a more or less female or male environment, that is, having same- or opposite-sex siblings does not impact one’s tendency to be academically more or less verbally or numerically aligned.
Article
Does growing up with a sister rather than a brother affect personality? In this article, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the effects of siblings’ gender on adults’ personality, using data from 85,887 people from 12 large representative surveys covering nine countries (United States, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Australia, Mexico, China, and Indonesia). We investigated the personality traits of risk tolerance, trust, patience, locus of control, and the Big Five. We found no meaningful causal effects of the gender of the next younger sibling and no associations with the gender of the next older sibling. Given the high statistical power and consistent results in the overall sample and relevant subsamples, our results suggest that siblings’ gender does not systematically affect personality.
Article
This paper sheds light on the formation process of noncognitive skills by examining the determinants of a host of personality traits. Using data from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS), for individuals in larger families (three or more children), we find having a same‐sex sibling leads to improved long‐run noncognitive skills and positive personality traits. The latter result is driven entirely by females. We examine potential mechanisms by exploring the links between parental investment and sibling interactions. The results could possibly speak to public actions to enhance child development and human capital accumulation.