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Objective To assess SARS-COV-2 seroprevalence in Oman and longitudinal changes in antibody levels over time within the first 11 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods This nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted as a four-cycle serosurvey using a multistage stratified sampling method from July–November 2020. A questionnaire was used and i...
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SMEs is consider as an important component of economic development, create job opportunities, and bring innovation and social welfare. Empirical evidence shows that SMEs plays a major role in creating employment in developed countries. In developing countries there are mixed results-- there is no direct relation between entrepreneurship and employm...
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The study investigates whether corporate board characteristics influence dividends policy in Omani listed firms. It also examines whether this relationship is determined by the recent global oil crisis. Using a sample of 109 listed firms in Muscat Securities Exchange between 2009 and 2019, we find that dividends payout is positively associated with...
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Construction delay in projects is a common manifestation in the construction industry. Delay in construction will lead to a bad relationship between the parties involved and will also lead to an increase in the allocated completion time. Delay in the ongoing project might result in the loss of the money, time and other facilities by the client and...

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... Additionally, the findings contradict those of Kalaitzi and Chamberlain (2020), who investigated the idea that export has little to no influence on the expansion of Oman's economy. Khan and Khan (2021) showed that import had a favorable impact on Oman's economic growth, while export had a negative impact. Khan ...
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This study determines Oman’s most important macroeconomic factors between 1990 and 2019. The ARDL bound test findings for co-integration show that both long and short runs exist. The error-correcting mechanism further states that when the divergence from long-run equilibrium is rectified at an adaptation speed of 78.9%, it signals an inversion to a long-run stable state. In response to a change in the previous year’s economic growth, the final consumption expenditure indicates a rise of 0.472; the gross fixed capital formation and export indicate hikes of 0.149 and 0.358 at a 1% significance level. Additionally, the findings of co-integration regression using fully modified ordinary least square (FMOLS), dynamic ordinary least square (DOLS), and canonical co-integration regression (CCR) were used to strengthen and validate the results that export ranks first in Oman, followed by final consumption spending. Therefore, export, gross fixed capital formation, and final consumption expenditure are vital macroeconomic elements supporting Oman’s economic development.
... The relationship between exports and imports and their impact on a country's economic success is a hot topic for economists, policymakers, and to some extent, academics as economic growth is considered the best indicator of a country's well-being or economic prosperity (Khan & Khan, 2021). The past two decades have seen tremendous trade integration and expansion, as well as a changing global trade environment (Sokolov-Mladenović et al., 2016). ...
... They reported unidirectional causality leading from GDP to imports and unidirectional causality leading from exports to imports. Khan and Khan (2021) found a unidirectional causal effect from imports to GDP and a unidirectional causality from exports to GDP for Oman, while GDP had no causal influence on exports or imports. Millia et al. (2021) used the ARDL model to show that exports and imports have a positive effect on economic growth. ...
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The aim of this paper is to examine the nexus between exports, imports, and economic growth for the Kosovo’s economy in the period 2010-2021. Unit root tests were used to test the stationarity condition. The ADF, P-P and KPSS tests showed that the three variables are stationary in the first difference. The Johansen cointegration test showed that these variables are cointegrated in the short run. The lag length was set to five based on three criteria. The proposed model was free of serial autocorrelation and heteroskedasticity. Granger causality results based on Vector Autoregression showed that there is a bidirectional causality relationship between exports and economic growth. There is no causality between imports and economic growth. However, there is unidirectional causality from economic growth to imports and unidirectional causality from exports to imports. This study supports the ELG theory, i.e., exports are an important driver of economic growth.
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This study was conducted to examine the effect of the variable use of CO2 emission gas and export variables on Indonesia’s economic growth. The data used in this study are time series data from the two variables for the period 2004 to 2019. All data were obtained from the world bank and accessed through the www.data.worldbank.org. The data analysis method used in this study uses an autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) model approach. The ARDL model is used to examine the short-term and long-term effects of CO2 gas emission variables and export variables. The results of the study found that the variable use of CO2 emission gas in the short term had a positive and insignificant effect on economic growth. The export variable has a significant positive effect on economic growth. Meanwhile, in the long term, the variable use of CO2 emission gas and the export variable has no effect on Indonesia’s economic growth. This finding shows that Indonesia’s economic growth is still determined by exports, but in the long term the government must work harder to increase its exports. In addition, export activities must not lead to the use of excessive CO2 emissions.