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Summary of Factors That Hinder Success in Group work in an Online Course

Summary of Factors That Hinder Success in Group work in an Online Course

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Context 1
... the two subgroups, there were statistically significant d i ff e rences in some challenging factors at α = .05 (see Table 2). Participants in the unsatisfied subgroup perceived some aspects as more challenging than did participants in the satisfied subgroup. ...

Citations

... Hermanto and Srimulyani (2021) agreed that these variety of ways or learning model along with the current technological development enables the well implementation of online learning. In higher education settings, a popular method for delivering teaching and learning is through online education (Koh & Hill, 2009). Some studies suggest that the online learning environment can help students develop critical thinking and reflection skills. ...
... In a study by Cheng (2020), he described the challenges of "School's Out, But Class's On" in several aspects, specifically, in terms of traditional forms of school education, teachers' teaching methods, student's learning styles, and school administration. Koh and Hill (2009) state that students and faculty participating in online learning may have a negative effect on the overall class experience due to lacking or reduced sense of connection. Additionally, they found out that difficulty in communication due to technical problems is also a challenge in online learning. ...
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We are very happy to publish this issue of the International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research. The International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research is a peer-reviewed open-access journal committed to publishing high-quality articles in the field of education. Submissions may include full-length articles, case studies and innovative solutions to problems faced by students, educators and directors of educational organisations. To learn more about this journal, please visit the website http://www.ijlter.org. We are grateful to the editor-in-chief, members of the Editorial Board and the reviewers for accepting only high quality articles in this issue. We seize this opportunity to thank them for their great collaboration. The Editorial Board is composed of renowned people from across the world. Each paper is reviewed by at least two blind reviewers. We will endeavour to ensure the reputation and quality of this journal with this issue.
... Items SIQ1, SIQ5 and SIQ7 (M= 4.2) showed learners prefer to have social interaction with other learners in their learning session compared to learning individually. The important thing for online group work is social interaction while it will interact learners in term of social presence, learner's perception of collaboration, improve learner learning and satisfaction while learning online and it is also related to the group work when learners work in team toward skills of completing their project, hence communication is achieved when they interact openly (Koh & Hill, 2009). Learners will be aware of their comprehension abilities through the interaction (Alfares, 2017). ...
... Learners will be aware of their comprehension abilities through the interaction (Alfares, 2017). Individual learners characteristics, instructor's pedagogical strategies skills and online learning environment are the features affected to the social interaction (Koh & Hill, 2009). This is followed by items SIQ2, SIQ3, SIQ6 and SIQ8 (M= 4.1) shows that working in a group is helpful especially to build up their skill and make them less stressful in their class session. ...
... This is followed by items SIQ2, SIQ3, SIQ6 and SIQ8 (M= 4.1) shows that working in a group is helpful especially to build up their skill and make them less stressful in their class session. Working in groups indirectly can help learners in term of expanding their critical thinking skills and reflection skills as well (Koh & Hill, 2009). According to Godek (2004), by working in group learners can take an opportunity to apply their knowledge, experiences and skills. ...
... Literature on accessibility, on the other hand, has been focused on students' assessment of access conditions to online sessions [1,32,33], proposing some action lines for specific university programs [34]. Accessibility is one of the key principles of online learning [35]; however, important gaps in and between countries are still found [36]. ...
... This is a social phenomenon that has received a lot of academic attention lately, identifying various reasons, for instance, personal appearance, people in the background, poor internet connection [40], anxiety, fear of being exposed, shyness, and desire to maintain privacy [50]. Social interactions play a valuable role in group work, impacting students' perceptions about the learning experience [34]. Thus, the lack of social interactions in Zoom, at least as expected from presential contexts, would explain why engineering students showed lower levels of satisfaction with respect to the platform use. ...
Article
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The COVID-19 lockdown induced a sudden migration of traditionally presential learning activities to online domains, as was the case of inter-institutional summer schools. This research corresponds to a case study in which our organization had to reformulate, in less than three months, one of its traditional summer schools while trying to keep the original goals. Through qualitative and quantitative surveys, we aimed at identifying the impact of our reformulation through students’ perception of gained or lost value regarding four topics: (a) online teaching, (b) pre-recorded business cases, (c) online social events, and (d) technical solutions. By analyzing these four topics with emphasis on participants’ knowledge and learning experience, we identified some “tensions” leading to loss of value (i.e., belonging, performing, and organizing). These tensions suggest that future reformulations should be conducted considering students’ backgrounds and motivations.
... Even though most universities shared similar problems, there is also literature available indicating how to introduce distance learning [28]. Research has demonstrated that training to deliver virtual instruction helps instructors improve the quality of the virtual courses they teach and translates into an enhanced overall learning experience for the students enrolled in those courses [29]. ...
Article
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A primary motivation for this study was to compare student perceptions and performance within a virtual learning environment to the traditional in-person learning experience for the General Chemistry II course taught during a 5-week summer session at Xavier University of Louisiana, a minority serving institution. The authors present quantitative and qualitative analyses including the comparison of student performance on exams during the COVID-19 remote learning experience with exam performance over a 3-year period of conventional in-person instruction. In this article, student grades, survey feedback, and learning outcomes are outlined. This study was performed to assist the faculty in improving and enriching the course content and its delivery, as they coped with the transition to a virtual learning environment imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic.
... Faktor yang mempengaruhi individu dalam mengikuti kegiatan kelompok secara online adalah adanya perasaan komunitas atau keterlibatan sehingga menimbulkan koneksi di antara peserta didik. Komunikasi yang bermakna tercapai ketika peserta didik dapat berinteraksi secara terbuka (Koh & Hill, 2009). Sehingga terdapat tiga hal penting yang harus diciptakan dalam kegiatan kelompok online seperti kehadiran sosial, komunikasi terbuka, tanggapan kohesif, dan koneksi afektif. ...
Article
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The purpose of this study was to discuss the ethical role of the guidance and counseling profession, especially the principle of confidentiality in the implementation of online counseling. This research method uses a descriptive qualitative literature review that examines several scientific articles accompanied by the results of interviews and previous research results. The data analysis technique uses descriptive analysis techniques. The results of this study explain that counselors have an ethical responsibility to explain the meaning of confidentiality in group counseling. The principle of confidentiality is important considering that the professional ethics of the counselor pays more attention to the privacy of the counselee, because it will involve comfort and security in receiving counseling services. In the implementation of online counseling, counselors can anticipate the possibility of unwanted violations by making efforts such as: (1) Conducting interviews and evaluations when forming groups, (2) Conducting in-depth observations when providing classical services in the classroom, (3) Grouping individuals who voluntarily and voluntarily participate in group activities, (4) Giving informed consent containing personal data, applicable rules, and cooperation agreements which contain the privacy security of themselves and other members, (5) Members affix their signatures on the under a statement about what they will accept if they do not fulfill it.
... It underscores the frequency of interactions, discussions, tutorials, etc. Engagement with faculty can be synchronous as well as asynchronous in online environment. Student faculty engagement brings in positive influence on the level of student satisfaction [33][34][35] enhance critical thinking [36], foster sense of belongingness & community, help in conveying expectations [37], enhance student retention [38,39] underline that few face-to-face interactions, lesser connect among students are few challenges considered for online student engagement. ...
Chapter
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During the recent times, online courses have become part of mainstream education for educational institutions. Engaging students for online courses is important as well as challenging. Based on the literature, we attempt to investigate what are the factors that lead to student engagement for online courses. First, we apply factor analysis to investigate the theoretical constructs and manifest factors. Then, network analysis is used to explore how the different antecedents are related to each other. Main findings include that (1) student faculty connect is essential for establishing student engagement (2) acquisition of analytical skills underpins the student engagement levels and (3) engaging students in research, collaborative work and self-driven learning also raises the levels of student engagement.
... Higher levels of social capital and sense of community are significantly associated with lower levels of loneliness [49]. Fostering group work in the online classroom can pose new challenges [50]; nonetheless, it can have overwhelming benefits including increased motivation, creativity, and reflection [51]-essentials during a time of increased isolation for students. ...
Preprint
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Laboratory courses are an important part of the undergraduate physics curriculum. During physics labs, students can engage in authentic, hands-on experimental practices, which can prepare them for graduate school, research laboratories, and jobs in industry. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in spring 2020, colleges and universities across the world rapidly transitioned to teaching labs remotely. In this work, we report results from a survey of physics lab instructors on how they adapted their courses in the transition to emergency remote teaching. We found that the instructors who responded to the survey faced numerous challenges when transitioning their classes to remote instruction, particularly in providing students with a similar experience to the in-person labs. In addition, we identified common themes in the instructors' responses including changing learning goals of the courses to be more concept-focused, reducing group work due to equity and technological concerns, and using a variety simulation tools, as well as report on factors that the instructors hoped to continue once they have returned to in-person instruction.
... Kim et al. (2005) suggests that the absence of face-to-face contact among students creates a communication barrier. The lack of a physical collegiate community diminishes group dynamics and opportunities to effectively facilitate teamwork (Koh and Hill 2009). ...
Article
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Archaeology is in many ways a hands–on and materials– based discipline, which presents specific challenges for online teaching and learning. Online and ‘blended’ teaching modes have been available to archaeology students for some time but, in March 2020, Australian universities were required to switch all content to online delivery to reduce COVID–19 transmission in our communities. Enormous efforts were made by university teaching staff to swiftly accommodate these changes. This paper presents student perspectives on learning archaeology online in 2020 and beyond. It outlines obstacles associated with learning archaeology online, shares student feedback on the pros and cons of undertaking different types of online activities and considers the role that online learning may be able to play in the longer–term. The differences between in–person and online learning are pedagogical as well as practical. We hope that sharing student experiences will help elucidate what makes certain activities and resources effective for learning archaeology online, and that this information can be used to inform future online resource development.
... Kim et al. (2005) suggests that the absence of face-to-face contact among students creates a communication barrier. The lack of a physical collegiate community diminishes group dynamics and opportunities to effectively facilitate teamwork (Koh and Hill 2009). ...
Conference Paper
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A key driving force behind the success of the Victorian Archaeology Colloquium is the participation and direction of Traditional Owners in the cultural heritage, landscapes, and concepts that are presented and discussed each year. Traditional Owner involvement commenced during planning for the very first Colloquium, ten years ago, and has continued to grow since. This trend is evident in the increasing number of Traditional Owners attending the Colloquium each year; growing diversity of First Nations represented; and increasing number of Traditional Owners leading and co–authoring presentations and subsequent publications in the Colloquium proceedings, Excavations, Surveys and Heritage Management in Victoria. This paper presents the full transcript of a panel discussion by four Traditional Owners from Wurundjeri Woiwurrung, Wotjobaluk, Dja Dja Wurrung and Wadawurrung Country in Victoria on 1 February 2021, the second panel discussion of the 10th Anniversary Victorian Archaeology Colloquium. The panel discussion was recorded as a Zoom Webinar and transcribed using Otter (2021). Caroline Spry and Darren Griffin edited the transcript of the second panel discussion. Traditional Owner panellists considered their experiences in archaeological research, investigations and cultural heritage management projects, and the successes and constraints encountered over the last decade. Drawing on these experiences the panellists present their vision of the future for best-practice archaeology and land management in Victoria. Their conversation highlights that First Peoples cultural heritage is complex, dynamic and continuing, and what western scientific paradigms class as archaeology (or experimental archaeology) is for Traditional Owners a way of continuing their traditional practices and passing knowledge onto future generations. (FULL REFERENCE: Griffin, D., T. Gilson, R. Kerr, B. Muir, D. Wandin, E. Foley and C. Spry 2021 Traditional Owner perspectives on archaeological research, cultural heritage management, and continuing cultural practice in Victoria over the past decade: A panel discussion at the 10th Victorian Archaeology Colloquium. In D. Kelly, E. Foley, D. Frankel, C. Spry, S. Lawrence, I. Berelov and S. Canning (eds), Excavations, Surveys and Heritage Management in Victoria. Volume 10, pp.25–33. Melbourne: La Trobe University)
... The utilization of group work online, as Koh & Hill (2009) claim, is increasing. However, the collaboration of students in an entirely online setting is a complex phenomenon (Hakkinen, 2004). ...