Fig 6 - uploaded by Stefania Nisio
Content may be subject to copyright.
– Suddivisione del territorio di Roma in 4 quadranti e ubicazione delle principali aree interessate da cavità sotterranee. -Subdivision of the territory of Rome in 4 quadrants and location of the underground cavities main areas.  

– Suddivisione del territorio di Roma in 4 quadranti e ubicazione delle principali aree interessate da cavità sotterranee. -Subdivision of the territory of Rome in 4 quadrants and location of the underground cavities main areas.  

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
The anthropogenic sinkholes in the urban area of Rome are closely linked to the network of underground cav- ities produced by human activities (water networks, caves, cat- acombs, etc.) in more than two thousand years of history. The collapse of such underground cavities and the subsequent fall down of the shallower layers of the soil may originate...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... molti a Roma gli eventi di sprofondamento recenti che hanno messo in luce la presenza di gallerie sotterranee di cui si era persa memoria. Viene analiz- zata, sinteticamente, la situazione nei quattro qua- dranti in cui può essere divisa l'area urbana ( fig. 6). Il 26 agosto del 1997 presso Viale Cardinale Angelo dell'Acqua (Castel Sant'Angelo, tra il fos- sato interno e il bastione della cinta pentagonale) si aprì una voragine con diametro di 3-4 m, e 8 m di profondità che mise in evidenza la presenza di un cunicolo sotterraneo ( fig. 7), di cui nessuno ne conosceva l'esistenza, lungo ...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
Subsidence information is of paramount significance for the restoration and treatment of geological destruction in mining areas. However, the traditional interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) technique is incapable of detecting mining subsidence with large gradient deformation. To overcome this limitation, this study proposes a fine subs...

Citations

... The general shape of the park is a long wedge defined by one main axis, the Appia Antica street, which runs for about 16 km from northeast (Numa Pompilio square, in the vicinity of the archeological area of Caracalla thermal baths, in the historic center of Rome) to southwest (Ciampino and Marino Municipalities). Coordinates of the park are: 41°50′00″ latitude N, 12°33′00″ longitude E. The main boundaries of the park are (see Gravitational landforms: two main types were observed, i.e., falls, which occur especially in the Caffarella valley and Tor Marancia locality where there are some slopes with a high gradient (more than 80%, even vertical) ( Figure 6) (no data occur in the map of the Italian landslide for the study area [47]) and sinkholes originating from the collapse of underground cavities (see below under "Man-made landforms") and the subsequent subsidence of the shallower layers of the soil [48]. The latter gravitational landforms have dimensions ranging from 1-6 m of depth and 1-12 m of diameter (pers. ...
... The most widespread human-made landforms are represented by a dense network of underground cavities, which are especially concentrated in the Caffarella area (north of the park). These cavities ( Figure 7) were firstly used to extract material for construction of buildings and catacombs, i.e., lithic tuffs and unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits (Pozzolane), and to distribute and collect water [48]. The more recent use of these cavities (up to the 1990s) was as mushroom patches (genera Pleurotus (Fr.) P. Kumm. and Agaricus L. (A. bisporus (J.E.Lange) Imbach, named "champignon")). ...
Article
Full-text available
The first inventory of the flora of Appia Antica Regional Park (Italy), one of the largest protected urban areas in Europe (4580 ha), its biological, ecological and biogeographical composition, and notes of the vegetation physiognomies and landscape are presented; physical characteristics of the territory (geomorphology, lithotypes, and phytoclimate) are also given. The landscape is defined by an agricultural matrix with natural and seminatural areas as patches, and riparian vegetation communities as corridors. The vegetation physiognomies are represented by types linked to the Mediterranean climate (mixed, Mediterranean, and riparian forests; scrubby, rocky, aquatic, and helophytic vegetation; anthropogenic communities). The floristic list includes 714 taxa (104 families and 403 genera). Therophytes prevail over hemicryptophytes; woody flora comprises about 30% of alien species. As regards chorotypes, together with a considerable number of Mediterranean species, there are many exotic species with wide distribution areas testifying to a long-lasting anthropic impact. Floristic novelties (european, national, and regional levels) for 21 taxa are reported. The extraordinary species diversity discovered (43% of flora of Rome and 20% of regional flora) is linked to the landscape heterogeneity, the characteristics of which are: (1) persistence of residual natural patches, (2) occurrence of quite well-preserved aquatic habitats and humid meadows, (3) a rich anthropogenic flora, (4) an interesting flora of archeological sites, (5) occurrence of species not common in Latium, (6) occurrence of populations of aliens in crops (which cause economic impact), (7) presence of aliens on archeological ruins (which cause economic-social impacts). The extensive set of data provided represents a general base framework for guiding future research efforts and landscape action plans consistent with environmental sustainability.
... La via Portuense pertanto nasconde ancora altre cavità ipogee, possibili aree a rischio del territorio, che sono messe in evidenza anche dalla carta di densità di sinkholes (Nisio, 2019;Ciotoli et al. 2015b). ...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT - Since Roman times, the extraction of building material for the cultivation of the tufa (in the alternative tufa of Monteverde) was widespread along the route of the Campana - Portuense road and involved a large area around the road axis, from the southernmost hills of Monteverde to Magliana. Over the centuries, the tuff of Monteverde for its mechanical qualities and ease of processing was widely used as a building material and was cultivated mainly underground. In these underground quarries large areas of necropolis developed; they marked for centuries the funeral destination of the Portuense territory. The underground Christian cemetery of San Felice was located near a church on the third mile of the road axis. The cemetery, dedicated to the antipope Saint Felix II, was restored in three different historical periods up to 858 A.D., and was a pilgrimage destination until about 1100 A.D. However, after about 1500 A.D., the entrance and location of the catacomb were lost. Over the centuries, many authors have looked for it in vain and the researches continue to this day. The impossibility of finding this disappeared catacomb lies in the fact that the ancient route of the Via Campana-Portuense was different from the present one, and that the starting point of the road within the Urbe is not known with certainty. What is certain is that it was located on a hill from which one could see, in the distance, the area im- mediately north of the Basilica of St. Paul. The place was reachable from Via Campana-Portuense uphill, through a small path starting from the bank of the Tiber river.
Article
Full-text available
Geologia dell'Ambiente • Supplemento al n. 1/2021 239 RIASSUNTO La Via Nomentana è una delle tante vie consolari che devono il proprio no-me alla città a cui arrivavano partendo dal centro di Roma, dunque a Nomen-tum (attuale Mentana). La denominazione originale era via Ficulensis, perché la strada era inizial-mente limitata a Ficulea; il prolunga-mento fino a Nomentum portò in seguito al cambio di nome. La strada aveva origine a Roma pres-so Porta Collina, nelle mura serviane, e da lì proseguiva in direzione nord-est fino a Nomentum. Attualmente, la via Nomentana par-te da Porta Pia, a un centinaio di metri dall' originale Porta, nella porzione set-tentrionale di Roma. Il territorio ai lati della via Nomen-tana, entro l'Urbe e subito fuori di essa (oggi può essere circoscritto al Grande Raccordo Anulare), era particolarmente ricco di luoghi di culti pagani e in segui-to cristiani. I culti ebraici e cristiani, in partico-lare, hanno dato luogo ad un imponente sviluppo di aree cimiteriali sotterranee, di cui alcune sono oggi ancora scono-sciute. Tali catacombe scomparse potreb-bero rappresentare un rischio per la popolazione in quanto potenzialmente sottoposti a fenomeni di sprofonda-mento improvviso (sinkholes). L'area della via Nomentana, inoltre, in epoca romana e pre-romana era ricca di acque e di sorgenti il territorio cir-costante si presentava particolarmente paludoso. In tal senso Plutarco riferisce che uno degli impegni di Giulio Cesare fu proprio quello di bonificare le paludi nomentane che erano del tutto parago-nabili a quelle Pontine. Lungo la strada sorgevano alcune sorgenti di acque minerali; Strabone ri-corda le Acque Labane, oggi scomparse, che avevano grande portata; si presen-tavano fredde e albule alla vista, ovvero opalescenti, mineralizzate. La via Nomentana: luoghi di culto ipogei e acque sotterranee Nomentana street: cult places and underground waters Parole chiave: Via Nomentana, Roma, culti, cavità sotterranee, catacombe, sorgenti
Article
Full-text available
RIASSUNTO La città di Roma è interessata da un tessuto artifi ciale di reti caveali sviluppate-si all'interno delle formazioni piroclastiche, dovute all'attività dei distretti vulcanici dei Colli Albani e dei Monti Sabatini. Nel corso dei secoli le piroclastiti sono state oggetto di attività estrattiva di materiali per l'edilizia e/o di scavi in sotterraneo nelle catacombe, nei colombari storici e in numerosi ipogei. La presenza di questi vuoti artifi ciali, spesso in cattivo stato di conservazione, determina si-tuazioni di pericolosità in vari quartieri e mu-nicipi di Roma. Si verifi cano spesso crolli delle cavità, che possono interessare edifi ci, strade ed infrastrutture. Le aree maggiormente inte-ressate dalla presenza di queste cavità sono state segnalate in numerosi studi bibliogra-fi ci ed indicate in apposite cartografi e. Alcune di queste cavità svolgono anche la funzione di habitat per numerose specie di Chirotteri, caratteristiche di ambienti ipogei ed oggetto di una protezione rigorosa ai sensi della Diret-tiva 92/43/CEE "Habitat". Il presente articolo, descrive la particolare situazione di pericolo-sità geologica e di vulnerabilità ambientale delle cavità sotterranee dell'area romana. Sono illustrate le attività che le strutture re-gionali competenti stanno predisponendo per la conoscenza delle aree con potenziale pre-senza di cavità nel sottosuolo e del loro stato di conservazione, nonché la verifi ca della pre-senza di specie di Chirotteri e la conseguente segnalazione alla Rete "ChiroNet". ABSTRACT The city of Rome is affect by an artifi cial network of underground cavities developed within the pyroclastic formations, due to the activity of the volcanic districts of the Colli Albani and Monti Sabatini. In the course of the centuries have these been the subject of mining activities for building materials and / or underground excavations in catacombs, in historic colombaria and in hypogea. The presence of these artifi cial holes, often in a bad state of conservation, determines dangerous situations in various districts and municipalities of Rome. This causes collapses that can affect buildings, roads and infrastructures. The areas, which are most, affect by the presence of these cavities, have been reported in numerous bibliographic studies and indicated in specifi c maps. Some of these cavities also act as habitats for many species of Bats, characteristics of hypogeal environments and subject to strict protection under the Directive 92/43/ CEE "Habitat". In the present article, start from the particular situation of geological danger and environmental vulnerability of the underground cavities of the Roman area. The activities that the competent regional structures preparing for the knowledge of areas with potential presence of cavities in the subsoil and of their conservation status, are illustrated, as well as the verifi cation of the presence of species of Bats and the consequent reporting to the Network "ChiroNet". 1. INQUADRAMENTO GEOMORFOLOGICO Il sottosuolo di Roma è interessato da un tessuto di cavità sotterranee artifi ciali di diversa natura (Crescenzi, Piro & Vallesi, 1995; Ciotoli et al., 2013, 2015 a, b, 2016), sviluppatesi nel corso della millenaria storia della città. Sono riconoscibili n° 5 tipologie di cavità sotterranee (Ciotoli et al., 2013, 2015 b): 1) Cave per l'estrazione di materiali per l'edilizia; 2) Catacombe e colombari; 3) Cuni-coli idraulici, acquedotti e fognature; 4) Ca-vità varie di interesse archeologico (cisterne, pozzi, cavità di servizio); 5) Cavità moderne (metropolitane; gallerie stradali e ferrovia-rie; parcheggi interrati). Le cavità, nel cor-so degli anni, hanno subito vari processi di trasformazione della loro destinazione d'uso, legate all'espansione urbanistica del territo-rio: da cave per il recupero di materiale da costruzione, a luoghi di culto per cerimoniali religiosi, a cimiteri ipogei, a opere idrauliche sotterranee, a rifugi e ricoveri bellici, ad aree destinate alla coltivazione di generi alimen-tari (fungaie), fi no all'uso attuale per la via-bilità sotterranea, per i parcheggi e per altre infrastrutture di trasporto (Funiciello et al., 2006; Ciotoli et al. 2013, 2015 a, b, 2016). Le cavità artifi ciali sono sviluppate princi-palmente nei terreni piroclastici (pozzolane e tufi) dei distretti vulcanici dei Colli Albani e dei Monti Sabatini, che sono relativamente teneri e facili da scavare e pertanto utilizza-bili come materiali da costruzione. Le aree maggiormente interessate dalla presenza di cavità artifi ciali si rinvengono nel settore sud est della città, come segnalato in diversi studi bibliografi ci () e in opportune cartografi e allegate (Fig. 1). A partire dal dopoguerra, la presenza di questi vuoti artifi ciali, spesso in cattivo stato di conservazione o di cui si è persa la memoria storica, ha determinato situazioni di perico-losità in vari quartieri e municipi di Roma, a causa: del peso dei fabbricati soprastanti, spesso costruiti ignorando la presenza dei vuoti nel sottosuolo; delle vibrazioni indotte sulle volte con aumento del grado di frattura-zione delle cavità, dovute al continuo aumen-to del traffi co veicolare e alla costruzione del-la linea della metropolitana; del degrado dei terreni provocato dalle perdite di acquedotti e fognature. In alcuni casi si sono verifi cati crolli e sgrottamenti in profondità, che hanno interessato edifi ci, strade ed infrastrutture di reti di servizi, presenti in superfi cie (Nisio, Cavità sotterranee di Roma: procedure regionali per la valu-tazione della pericolosità geolo-gica e attività di monitoraggio e conservazione della biodiversità Underground cavities of Rome: regional procedures for the assessment of geological hazard and monitoring and conservation of biodiversity Parole chiave (key words): pianificazione territoriale (urban planning), cavità sotterranee, (underground cavities), Natura2000 (Natura2000), monitoraggio (monitoring), chirotteri (bats)
Article
Full-text available
There are many archaeological and geological-geotechnical studies concerning underground cavities in the territory of Rome. These cavities constitute an intricate network of tunnels under the city, developing multi-layer systems, located at different depths. These voids are all of anthropogenic origin, dug in various ways, for various purposes (building, plumbing, religious etc.), but mo- stly for excavation of building materials. The Roman quarries were mainly built in volcanic soils. These constitute the most widespread cavities and are mainly concentrated in the eastern portion of the city. Mineral cultivation took place through the construction of tun- nels that provided an entrance to the base of the slope. The use of tuff quarries as areas of worship and cemeteries is successive and dates back to the I-III century A.C. The areas surveyed and used as private catacombs and hypogea represent the second type of under- ground cavity by extension. The conglomerate and sand quarries, built in the south-western part of the city, have lesser extension and were never used as necropolis but, later, as depo- sits, mushroom farms, etc. Unfortunately, this network of underground tunnels is known only in fragmentary form and many public and private buildings have been built above such unknown and uncontaminated voids. The pre- sence of underground cavities in particular conditions, together with the possible losses of the public water and sewage network, can cause the collapse of the most shallow layers of the ground with the formation of anthro- pogenic sinkholes at the surface determining risk for the precious Roman urban fabric. To date, an overall cartography and a complete database that show the actual extension of the cavities has never been produced. However, this information is now fundamental to study the hazard and the vulnerability of the Roman territory. In order to improve and complete the study and inventory of the underground cavi- ties, a Working Group (WG) has been set up by ISPRA (in which various bodies participa- te, among which: Roma Capitale, CNR-IGAG, National Civil Protection, Roma Metropolitane and the main Speleological Associations of Rome and the Pontifical Commission of Sa- cred Archeology) and involved in data collection. In this way, at the already available point data, the mapping of the areal development of the cavities has been added. The first results obtained by the WG and the first map of the underground cavities of Rome are therefore here presented. This map is still in progress, and is being processed and refined.
Article
Full-text available
Le acque nelle cavità sotterranee di Roma The water in the underground cavities of Rome Parole chiave (key words): Roma (Rome), cavità sotterranee (underground cavities), catacombe (cata-combs), sorgenti (springs) PIO BERSANI Ricercatore autonomo RIASSUNTO Nel sottosuolo della città di Roma sono presenti molte cavità di grandi dimensioni scavate dall'uomo; esse costituiscono una rete di gallerie a volte comunicanti, ubicate per lo più sulla sinistra idrografi ca del fi ume Tevere. Le cavità di maggiori dimensioni corri-spondono per la maggior parte ad antiche cave realizzate nelle rocce piroclastiche. Spesso la coltivazione si arrestava soltanto quando si raggiungeva la falda idrica, pertanto in molte gallerie si sono formati veri e propri laghetti sotterranei, il cui livello seguiva e segue tutto-ra, le oscillazioni della falda idrica principale o di piccole falde sospese. La formazione di questi specchi d'acqua è stata probabilmente favorita dalla coltivazio-ne dei terreni piroclastici nel periodo estivo, in condizioni di massima soggiacenza della falda che poi nei mesi invernali colmava le parti più profonde delle gallerie. In sinistra idrografi ca del Tevere, per le sue dimensioni, è da ricordare il lago situato presso il Tempio di Claudio al Celio, accanto alla chiesa dei SS. Giovanni e Paolo. In destra idrografi ca, sono stati rinvenuti due specchi d'acqua: il laghetto che si trova sotto la colli-na di Monteverde e quello ubicato proprio nei sotterranei dell'ospedale Forlanini. Nell'area del Campo Marzio, nel centro storico, la risalita della falda acquifera, do-vuta in particolare alla costruzione dei mura-glioni ottocenteschi (avvenuta tra il 1880 e il 1890), ha causato l'allagamento di molte cavità sotterranee. Un esempio è la tomba romana del console Aulo Irzio al di sotto del Palazzo della Cancelleria nell'omonima piaz-za, nei pressi di Campo dei Fiori. Un'altra causa che può aver infl uito sulla presenza di acqua nelle cavità sotterranee del centro storico, è l'innalzamento del piano campagna, dall'epoca romana all'attuale. È questo il motivo per cui parte della Meridiana di Augusto nel Campo Marzio è oggi som-mersa. Nell'antica Roma, infatti, era con-suetudine dopo un terremoto, un incendio o un'alluvione del Tevere, ricostruire a quota più elevata sulle macerie causate da incendi o da terremoti oppure sui detriti sabbiosi portati dalle piene del fi ume. Nella maggior parte della città si è assi-stito, invece, all'abbassamento della falda, molte sorgenti e pozzi si sono estinti nel tempo. Le fonti storiche descrivono la presenza di acque sorgive in sotterraneo (in alcune cave o in alcuni ipogei utilizzati come luoghi di culto) utilizzate anche come fonti battesima-li, scomparse a causa di tale abbassamento della falda. Il presente lavoro costituisce un contributo al censimento delle acque in sot-terraneo. INTRODUZIONE La presente ricerca prescinde dall'inqua-dramento idrogeologico della città di Roma (cui si rimanda), e vuole essere semplicemente un primo passo verso il censimento della presenza di acque nelle cavità sotterranee della città di Roma. Nel sottosuolo di Roma sono presenti mol-te gallerie sotterranee di grandi dimensioni, che costituiscono una rete a volte comuni-cante, ubicate in particolar modo in sinistra idrografi ca del fi ume Tevere, e realizzate per la coltivazione di materiali da costruzione (Ciotoli et alii, 2013; 2015 a, b, 2016; Nisio et alii, 2017). Le gallerie maggiormente estese sono scavate nelle rocce piroclastiche; alcuni ri-tengono che esse si estendessero molto più di quanto conosciamo oggi e che addirittura po-tessero esistere gallerie che passavano al di sotto del Tevere (D'agincourt Serouux; 1834). Nella città di Roma, l'escavazione delle rocce piroclastiche era effettuata principal-mente per due ragioni: avere materiale da co-struzione (tufo lapideo per ricavarne blocchi o pozzolane sciolte utilizzate per la malta ce-mentizia) e creare grandi cavità sotterranee utilizzate per scopi cimiteriali. Quasi sempre lo scavo soddisfaceva entrambe le necessità. Subordinatamente vi era necessità di creare cunicoli idraulici e cisterne sotterranee. Nella maggior parte dei casi la coltivazio-ne delle cave si arrestava soltanto quando si raggiungeva la falda idrica, per cui in molte erano presenti, e lo sono ancora oggi, dei veri e propri laghi sotterranei il cui livello segue le oscillazioni della falda. La formazione di alcuni di questi laghi è stata probabilmente favorita dal fatto che i terreni tufacei veni-vano coltivati soprattutto nel periodo estivo, quando il livello della falda era più basso. Nel periodo autunnale-invernale, con la risalita della falda idrica, la coltivazione veniva ar-restata, pertanto alcune parti di tali gallerie venivano allagate. Nella letteratura archeologica sono de-scritte, inoltre, vere e proprie sorgenti in sot-terraneo presenti in alcune catacombe, che venivano utilizzate stranamente, in epoca cristiana, come fonti battesimali o capta-te per uso potabile (Panvinio, 1568;
Article
Full-text available
The cemetery of Saint Felix was a large underground necropolis of ancient Rome, III- V centuries AD. According to the historical sources, this Christian catacomb was loca- ted in correspondence of the third mile of the ancient Portuense road, in the south-western sector of the urban area of Rome. In the medieval period, it was a well- known destination for the widespread pilgri- mage that was practiced in the remains of the popular Saint, but later, the entrance and the location of the catacomb were lost. Access to the cemetery was from a church, the Church of Saint Felix, also disappeared. Over the centuries, many authors have se- arched in vain for the exact location of this ca- tacomb and the possible ruins of the church. In order to identify a possible location of this vast cemetery area, a study was carried out in the Portuense district of Rome, com- paring the geological data with the historical ones, and the cavities found in the survey with the anthropogenic sinkholes, and with analysis from aerial photos and satellite data (PSIInSar ). The anthropogenic sinkholes in Rome, in fact, are closely connected to the presence of the widespread network of underground ca- vities (mainly occurring in volcanic soils), a legacy of more than 25 centuries of history. This network of underground tunnels is often subject to the collapse of the vaults, origina- ting sinkholes on the surface, especially along the road network. These events increased in the last twenty years and represent a growing hazard to the city. Susceptibility studies have recently been carried out, taking into consideration some predisposing factors (i.e., geology, morpho- logy, hydrology; Ciotoli et al., 2013, 2015) which allowed to realize a first thematic car- tography. In order to define a forecast model for sinkholes, the collected sinkholes events and the subterranean underground cavities were compared with the PSInSAR soil subsi- dence data. The observations obtained were then detailed in the Portuense district, in or- der, this time, to identify an area that could hide a wide underground cemetery (it seems to be equal by extension to the cemetery of San Callisto). By creating a series of cavity density maps some areas more susceptible to failure and with a high probability of the presence of underground cavities were identified. The cross-comparison between geological and hi- storical information allowed the identification of the possible location of the disappeared catacomb.
Article
Full-text available
Nelle principali città italiane è stato registrato negli ultimi venti anni un incremento degli eventi di sprofondamento dei suoli che hanno provocato la formazione di voragini di dimensioni a volte considerevoli (sinkholes antropogenici). I sinkholes antropogenici coinvolgono per lo più le sedi stradali, ville comunali, parchi o giardini, nonché aree occupate da cortili e edifici, dando origine ad aperture che mettono in luce ampie cavità nel substrato caratterizzate da diametro e profondità variabili. Gli sprofondamenti che si originano al di sotto delle fondazioni di edifici non sono sempre immediatamente individuabili perché tendono a provocare dapprima lenti cedimenti per poi arrivare a compromettere l'intera struttura o addirittura a generare il crollo dell'edificio. I sinkholes antropogenici possono coinvolgere veicoli e persone, causandone il ferimento o il decesso. Tali voragini sono originate dalla presenza di un vuoto sotterraneo generatosi involontariamente o realizzato dall'attività umana a vario titolo. I vuoti nel sottosuolo delle città italiane sono stati per lo più realizzati, in millenni di storia, dall'attività antropica per l'approvvigionamento di materiale da costruzione, sono cave sotterranee costituite da intrecci di gallerie mai bonificate dopo il loro utilizzo. I sinkholes antropogenici si sviluppano per crolli successivi delle volte di tali cavità sotterranee, ubicate a qualche metro di profondità dal piano di calpestio. Subordinatamente essi sono connessi a fenomeni di dilavamento dei terreni sciolti al di sotto del manto stradale, dovuti a problemi di inadeguatezza della rete dei sottoservizi. Spesso le due cause si sommano La maggior parte degli eventi vengono registrati in concomitanza di eventi piovosi intensi, una scarsissima percentuale di essi, invece, è stata registrata in occasione di terremoti. Parole chiave Sinkholes antropogenici, rischio naturale, cavità sotterranee Abstract-Anthropogenic sinkholes in Italian cities In the last twenty years, in the main Italian cities, increase of the anthropogenic sinkholes has been recognized. Anthropogenic sinkholes mainly involve roadways, parks or gardens, and some areas occupied by courtyards and civil buildings. The sinkholes origin large cavities in the surface of soil, characterized by diameter and depth between one meter to some tens of meters. The sinkholes originate under the foundations of buildings are not always immediately identifiable because they cause slow sagging before to compromise all the structure and they can origine the collapse of the building. The anthropogenic sinkholes can involve vehicles and people, causing death. These sinkholes in Italian cities are originate by underground cavities in the urban substratum. These cavities were realized by human activity in various ways. The voids have been mostly realized by the anthropic activity by supply of construction material (underground quarries) in millennia of history. The quarries are constituted by some tunnels; after their use they haven't been reclaimed. The anthropogenic sinkholes evolve by successive collapses of the vaults. They are located a few meters deep from the floor. Subordinately they are connected to phenomena of washing of the soil beneath the road surface. Often the two causes add up (presence of an underground cavities and widespread leaching of the most superficial land). Rarely the sinkholes are originated by natural causes. Some sinkholes occurred concurrently with rainy events. Low percentage of them was originated during earthquakes.
Article
Full-text available
Sacred and mineralized waters, gaseous emissions, subsidence, volcanism and seismicity in the roman area: historical data and additional contributions BERSANI P. (*), NISIO S. (**), PIZZINO L. (***) ABSTRACT - A historical and archaeological research about the natural phenomena that occurred in the past in the Rome area, analyzing the urban area to the coast of Anzio, was made, with the main goal to highlight their possible relationship with the geological setting of this sector of central Italy. The following features were taken into account: the presence of mineralized waters, springs considered as sacred, gas emissions, natural sinkholes, historical seismicity data as well as stratigraphic logs. It was found that many of the considered factors (mineralized springs, gas emissions, natural sinkholes, etc.) are aligned along a NNW-SSE direction (N 165°) which could correspond to a tectonic disturbance parallel to the Apennine belt, already recognized by other authors both in the northern and southern sectors of Rome. The existence of this main direction seems to be strengthened also by: i) the alignment of the eccentric craters of the Latium Volcano; ii) by the occurrence of both the epicenters of major Roman’s earthquakes occurred in the last centuries and iii) the epicentres of the most recent instrumental low-magnitude earthquakes. The largest earthquakes took place in the urban area of Rome in 1812 (VI -VII MCS), 1895 (VI -VII MCS) and 1909 (VI MCS); in 1919, a moderate earthquake (VI –VII MCS) occurred in the southern shoreline, near the village of Anzio. In particular, the lines of equal seismic intensities referred to the 1895 and 1909 earthquakes are oriented along this hypothesized NNW – SSE structure. If confirmed, the NNW-SSE direction (N 165°) could be seen as a master fault in the city of Rome; such tectonic element may be a single structure or, more likely, it can consist of more small segments, belonging to the same system of deformations. The reconstruction of the recently published stratigraphic-structural setting of Monti della Farnesina (north of Rome), strongly support our inferences. New stratigraphic data emerged from the recent creation of the Gallery John XXIII; the presence of fault systems cutting Pliocene-quaternary sedimentary substrate (with a 50 m wide band of deformation, N340° - 60° oriented), was recognized. These NE dipping dislocations, with extensional feature, have the same direction proposed in this work, and a displacement of more than 30 m. This possible tectonic line is very close to the basilicas of St. Peter, to the north of Rome and St. Paul to the south; once established its existence, it might take the name of “Fault of St. Peter and St. Paul” (Patron Saints of Rome). Bibliographic studies, recent small earthquakes localized by INGV seismic network, along with ground (i.e. morphologic) and geological evidence, could emphasize that the main tectonic direction is crossed by perpendicular (i.e. NE-SW running) fault systems. According to structural and seismological researches, these faults can generate moderate ( Mmax = 5) earthquakes in the study area as a whole, from Rome to the southern shoreline. Key word: Rome, sacral springs - mineral spring, crater, sinkholes, earthquakes _______________ (*) Libero Professionista (**) Ispra – Dipartimento Difesa del Suolo, Servizio Geologico d’Italia (***) INGV - Roma