Figure 5 - uploaded by Giridhara R Babu
Content may be subject to copyright.
Subgroup analysis: Cohort studies with better methodological quality vs. poor methodological quality. 

Subgroup analysis: Cohort studies with better methodological quality vs. poor methodological quality. 

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
Job strain results from a combination of high workload and few decision-making opportunities in the workplace. There is inconsistent evidence regarding the association between job strain and hypertension, and methodological shortcomings preclude firm conclusions. Thus, a meta-analysis of observational studies on hypertension among occupational grou...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... we observed considerable heterogeneity among the estimates of cohort studies, with the I 2 statistic being 80% (see figure 3). The observed heterogeneity was further explored in subgroup ana- lysis and heterogeneity was reduced to zero (I 2 =0%, p=0.15) among studies with good methodological quality while the asso- ciation between hypertension and job strain still remained (I 2 for good methodological quality was 0% compared to 86% for poor quality studies) (see figure 5). Among the cohort studies, a positive association was seen only among studies with good methodological quality (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.25 to 1.77) (see online supplementary appendix 3). ...

Citations

... However, other studies found that unskilled workers were found to have more HTN than professionals and managerial ones [45,46]. The difference in job strains, work environment, and levels of decision-making are among the factors that underlie the differences in HTN prevalence by occupations [47]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Minimal data is available on the prevalence and correlates of hypertension and prehypertension in Dubai. The study aims to measure the prevalence of hypertension and pre-hypertension and the associated socio-demographic characteristics, behavioral risk factors and comorbidities among the adult population of Dubai. Methods: This study used data from the Dubai Household Health Survey, 2019. A cross-sectional population survey based on a complex stratified cluster random design. The total eligible sample included 2530 adults (18+). Sociodemographic and behavioral factors were considered as independent covariates. The main study outcome variables, pre-hypertension and hypertension, were ordinal, with normotension as the reference group. Results: The overall prevalence of hypertension in adults was 32.5% (38.37% in males and 16.66% in females). Prehypertension was prevalent in 29.8% of adults in Dubai (28.85% in males and 32.31% in females). The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age groups, gender, occupation, and high Body Mass Index were significantly associated with a higher risk of hypertension at the level of P < 0.05. No clear trend toward a higher correlation of hypertension was noted with the increase in age, except after the age of 50 years. Males were five- times more likely to be hypertensive than females. Participants enrolled in skilled and service works had a five times higher risk of hypertension, compared with the reference group (professionals). Obese subjects had a 5.47-times greater correlation of hypertension compared with normal-weight subjects. Physically active individuals were less likely to develop hypertension. For the correlates with prehypertension in the present analysis, skilled and service workers and those working in elementary jobs had a higher risk of prehypertension, compared with the reference group (professionals) Individuals with a status of overweight were associated with a higher prevalence of prehypertension compared with people of normal weight. Conclusions: This study showed a high prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension among adults in Dubai. Some socio-demographic and behavioral risk factors were correlated with prehypertension and hypertension among the studied population. Interventions aiming at increasing public awareness about such risk factors are essential.
... The job strain model developed by Robert [81] has been used countless times ever since its inception. According to his model, the combination of high psychological demands and low control over work can turn into both a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases [17], as well as for the elevation of the arterial blood pressure [9,96]. ...
... Retrieved from: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/ALL/?uri=celex%3A31989L0391 (Access 24-04-2021).8 Retrieved from: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A31990L0270 (Access 24-04-2021).9 Retrieved from: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=celex%3A31990L0269 (Access 24-04-2021). ...
Chapter
Technology has disrupted each current industry, and supply chain is not going to be an exception. Businesses are already starting to establish interconnected global networks of Cyber-Physical Systems with the help of the Internet of Things and Cloud Computing. In this context, the chapter will debate aspects related to the new challenges of reducing ergonomics risks in manufacturing warehouse logistics by valorizing emerging technologies to create workplace wellbeing. After an extended literature review regarding the relevant ergonomics approaches in warehouse logistics, there will be presented some warehouse ergonomics solutions to be considered for the next generation of logistics system. The solutions described will refer to the monitoring and improvement of the ergonomic reality. Finally, conclusions and future trends will end the chapter.
... However, other studies found that unskilled workers were found to have more HTN than professionals and managerial ones [43,44]. The difference in job strains, work environment, and levels of decision-making are among the factors that underlie the differences in HTN prevalence by occupations [45]. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Minimal data is available on the prevalence and correlates of hypertension and prehypertension in Dubai. The study aims to measure the prevalence of hypertension and pre-hypertension and the associated socio-demographic characteristics, behavioral risk factors and comorbidities among the adult population of Dubai. Methods This study used data from the Dubai Household Health Survey, 2019. A cross-sectional population survey based on a complex stratified cluster random design. The total eligible sample included 2,530 adults (18+). Sociodemographic and behavioral factors were considered as independent covariates. The main study outcome variables, pre-hypertension and hypertension, were ordinal, with normotension as the reference group. Results The overall prevalence of hypertension in adults was 32.5% (38.37% in males and 16.66% in females). Prehypertension was prevalent in 29.8% of adults in Dubai (28.85% in males and 32.31% in females). The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age groups, gender, occupation, and high Body Mass Index were significantly associated with a higher risk of hypertension at the level of p < 0.05. No clear trend toward a higher correlation of hypertension was noted with the increase in age, except after the age of 50 years. Males were five- times more likely to be hypertensive than females. Participants enrolled in skilled and service works had a five times higher risk of hypertension, compared with the reference group (professionals). Obese subjects had a 5.47 times greater correlation of hypertension compared with normal-weight subjects. Physically active individuals were less likely to develop hypertension. For the correlates with prehypertension in the present analysis, skilled and service workers and those working in elementary jobs had a higher risk of prehypertension, compared with the reference group (professionals) Individuals with a status of overweight were associated with a higher prevalence of prehypertension compared with people of normal weight. Conclusions This study showed a high prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension among adults in Dubai. Some socio-demographic and behavioral risk factors were correlated with prehypertension and hypertension among the studied population. Interventions aiming at increasing public awareness about such risk factors are essential.
... On the contrary Babu and co-workers found that hypertension was more common in professional group as compared to unskilled and semi-skilled groups, but some of the studies have shown any significant association between occupational status and hypertension. 15 Probably, the level of occupation may materially affect physical activity and other aspect of life in relation to hypertension. 16 Among the overall alcoholics, very few percentage were normal followed by pre-hypertensive and many were found to have higher prevalence of hypertension. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Hypertension is important cause for globally contributing more than 40% to cardiac related deaths worldwide. The increase of hypertension in the developing countries may be connected with the economic transition The primary aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypertension among young adults such as college going degree students in urban Khammam, Telangana, India in relation to the socio-demographic variables associated with hypertension including age, sex, socio-economic status, body mass index, dietary habits, tobacco use and alcohol consumption.Methods: This study was a cross-sectional was conducted to determine the prevalence and pattern of hypertension among 625 college going degree students in urban Khammam, Telangana, area.Results: 625 students participated out of which 51.52% were males and 48.48% were females. The prevalence among males was higher as compared to females and found to be statistically significant (p<0.001). In the present study, associated factors like gender, age, marital status, occupation, education status, tobacco use, and physical activity were significantly associated with the hypertension status of the study subjects.Conclusions: This study establishes the prevalence of hypertension among males was higher compared to females. The socio-demographic variables such as dietary habits, BMI, alcohol and tobacco consumption play a pivotal role in the prevalence of hypertension.
... inTrODUcTiOn Chronic psychological stress has been found to have a deleterious impact on health, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease (1), hypertension (2), mental illness (3), and diabetes (4). Its role in cancer etiology is of growing interest and was earmarked as a high-priority exposure for review by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (5). ...
Article
Full-text available
Background Evidence is lacking regarding the potential role of chronic psychological stress on cancer incidence. The workplace is reported to be the main source of stress among Canadian men. We examined the association between perceived lifetime workplace stress and prostate cancer (PCa) risk in a large case–control study.Methods Cases were 1,933 men, aged ≤ 75 years, newly diagnosed with PCa in 2005–2009 across hospitals in Montreal, Canada. Concurrently, 1994 population controls frequency-matched on age were randomly selected from the electoral list based on cases’ residential districts. Detailed lifestyle and work histories (including perceived stress, from any type of work stressor, for each job held) were collected during in-person interviews. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between work-related stress and PCa risk in multivariate analyses.ResultsOver the lifetime, 58% of subjects reported at least one job as stressful. Occupations described as stressful were most often among white-collar workers. Perceived workplace stress duration was associated with a higher risk of PCa (OR = 1.12, 95% CI:1.04–1.20 per 10-year increase) among men younger than 65 years, but not among older men. Associations were similar irrespective of PCa aggressiveness. Frequent or recent screening for PCa, age at first exposure and time since exposure to work-related stress, and socioeconomic and lifestyle factors, had little influence on risk estimates.Conclusion Findings are in line with an association between reporting prolonged workplace stress and an increase in risk of PCa before age 65.
... Para a caracterização da demanda-controle e do suporte social no trabalho, foi utilizado o Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) proposto por Karasek, validado na versão em português para a população brasileira (18) e amplamente utilizado em estudos de associação com a HA (19) . Assim, a demanda de trabalho foi estimada a partir de um escore resultante do somatório dos valores referentes às questões relacionadas ao ritmo de trabalho, tempo para a realização das tarefas, tarefas conflitantes e volume excessivo de trabalho (18) . ...
Article
Objectives: Research has explored the relationship between job strain and adverse effects on physical and psychological health. Accordingly, the effects of job strain on mortality risk were pooled based on longitudinal studies. Study design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: Both researchers searched for published articles in scientific databases until May 2019. Then, the articles were screened based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The results were combined, and analyses of subgroups and reviewing the bias of the publication were performed as well. Results: Seventeen longitudinal studies included in the meta-analysis were from three continents: Europe, Asia, and America. The risk ratio (RR) of mortality based on job strain was equal to 1.20, with a confidence interval (CI) of 1.04-1.37 (P = 0.00.10). In men, the RR is 1.21, and the CI is 1.02-1.44 (P = 0.032), and in women, the RR is 0.97 and CI is 0.84-1.12 (P = 0.686). Evaluation of publication bias indicated nothing significant. Discussion: Based on the findings, it was found that job strain was a risk factor for mortality, and this finding was more appropriate for men. Hence, reducing job strain can be a deterrent against the dangers that threaten health.
Article
Full-text available
OBJECTIVE To assess the association between weekly working hours and self-rated health of nurses in public hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. METHODS A total of 3,229 nurses (82.7% of the eligible group) participated in this cross-sectional study, carried out between April 2010 and December 2011. The collection instrument consisted of a self-administered multidimensional questionnaire. The weekly working hours were calculated from a recall of the daily hours worked over seven consecutive days; this variable was categorized according to tertiles of distribution for men and women. The outcome of interest, self-rated health, was categorized into three levels: good (very good and good), regular, and poor (poor and very poor). The statistical analysis of the data included bivariate and multivariate analyses, having as reference group those with short working hours (first tertile). All the analyses were stratified by gender and elaborated using the program SPSS. RESULTS Among women, the group corresponding to the longest working week (more than 60.5 hours per week) were more likely to report regular self-rated health, compared with those with shorter working hours, after adjusting for confounding factors (OR = 1.30; 95%CI 1.02–1.67). Among men, those with average working hours (49.5–70.5 hours per week) were more than twice as likely to rate their health as regular (OR = 2.17; 95%CI 1.08–4.35) compared to those with shorter working hours (up to 49.5 hours). There was no significant association between long working hours and poor self-rated health. CONCLUSIONS The results point to the urgent need to promote interventions in the organization of work and appreciation of the nursing profession, in order to reduce the number of multiple jobs and thus contribute to mitigate potential effects on the health of workers and the quality of care in hospitals.
Article
Psychosocial work environments may adversely influence blood pressure, but the benefits of altering these factors and introducing coping resources is unclear. We examined whether changing work stressors and coping resources affect the risk of hypertension and elevated BP. A total of 13,145 workers from the Occupational Health Study of Petroleum Industry Workers were included in this study. A baseline evaluation of work-related stress and coping resources was followed up in all participants after 12 years. The changes in task stressors and coping resources were measured using the Occupation Stress Inventory-Revised Edition, and changes in job control and organizational stressors were evaluated using the Instrument for Stress-Related Job Analysis (v. 6.0). Elevated hypertension incidence and BP were associated with increased task and organizational stressors, together with decreased job control and reduced coping resources. Gender-specific differences were observed in the factors influencing BP. The main risk factor was decreased self-care in males (3.11 mm Hg) and increased responsibility in females (2.84 mm Hg). The present study demonstrated that promoting such factors at the task-, individual-, and organizational level may help improve cardiovascular health.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 17 November 2016; doi:10.1038/jhh.2016.79.