Study group participation and class retention. Pass (A, B, C) versus Drop/Fail (Drop, D, F) rates of participants in study groups versus nonparticipants for (A) spring (N 103), and (B) fall (N 240). Spring: 6.67% of participants dropped or failed the course (60 students attended: 4 dropped/failed) compared with 22% of nonparticipants (50 students never attended a study group: 11 dropped/failed). Fall: 14.7% of participants dropped or failed the course (95 students attended: 14 dropped/failed) compared with 37.8% of nonparticipants (180 students never attended a study group: 68 dropped or failed).

Study group participation and class retention. Pass (A, B, C) versus Drop/Fail (Drop, D, F) rates of participants in study groups versus nonparticipants for (A) spring (N 103), and (B) fall (N 240). Spring: 6.67% of participants dropped or failed the course (60 students attended: 4 dropped/failed) compared with 22% of nonparticipants (50 students never attended a study group: 11 dropped/failed). Fall: 14.7% of participants dropped or failed the course (95 students attended: 14 dropped/failed) compared with 37.8% of nonparticipants (180 students never attended a study group: 68 dropped or failed).

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We tested the effect of voluntary peer-facilitated study groups on student learning in large introductory biology lecture classes. The peer facilitators (preceptors) were trained as part of a Teaching Team (faculty, graduate assistants, and preceptors) by faculty and Learning Center staff. Each preceptor offered one weekly study group to all studen...

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Context 1
... Groups, Course Performance, and Retention. Partici- pants were less likely to drop or fail the course (Figure 3) and were more likely to earn higher grades (Figure 4). In addition, participants performed better on the final exam. ...
Context 2
... better essay performance was due to better lower-level (L1L2) essay scores (MWU 5553, p 0.025) but not to better higher-level (L3) essay scores (MWU 5798.5, p 0.076). Partici- pants were less likely to drop or fail the course (Figure 3) and were more likely to earn higher grades (Figure 4). After removing students with missing GPA (and GPA 1.0), the fall data set was reduced to 171 students: 65 study group participants and 106 nonparticipants. ...
Context 3
... across a wide range of abilities participated in study groups, and participation in study groups was asso- ciated with higher course completion in both semesters (Fig- ure 3). Peer-led study groups could thus be an effective retention "tool" for science classes and college in general. ...
Context 4
... fall study group preceptors tended to prepare work- sheets for their study groups, which was rarely the case in spring. While many participants appreciated this effort by the preceptors (Figure 7: A3), it may have allowed some fall participants to be less active learners during study groups and to focus less on their own misconceptions and learning difficulties than spring participants. Second, while the spring preceptor training was offered throughout the semes- ter as part of the weekly Teaching Team meetings, the fall training by Learning Center staff was centralized in a series of workshops (Table 1) for preceptors from different courses (in biology, chemistry and mathematics). ...

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... LAs are skilled students who serve in peer-mentor roles to help instructors engage their class in discussions and activities during lessons . Collaborative learning facilitated by peer mentors benefits students greatly (Groccia & Miller, 1996;Smith, 2008;Stanger-Hall et al., 2010), and the use of LAs has been shown to have synergistic benefits in active learning classrooms (Sellami et al., 2017). Nationwide data collected by the International Learning Assistant Alliance, established in 2008 at the University of Colorado (CU) at Boulder, indicates that students who interact with LAs attain greater learning outcomes and develop more positive perceptions of their STEM classroom experiences (Otero et al., 2016). ...
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