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Students recording podcast to embed in class wiki

Students recording podcast to embed in class wiki

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As a variation on game-based learning, we propose the concept of 'gameful learning' as a framework that encourages improvisation, playfulness, and social interaction, and which takes into account the unique contingencies of individual people and specific content. We describe gameful learning in terms of three elements: attitude, identity, and ignor...

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... multiple false starts they recorded a version that all guild members agreed represented their best work. Timmy uploaded it to their wiki (Figure 2). Students recording podcast to embed in class wiki ...

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... To our knowledge, this is the first time that peer evaluation training and its outcomes in regard to the quality of the peer feedback have been reported in a biomedical sciences course. There is liter-ature on gameful learning approaches (13), but not about how this impacts peer evaluation performance. To our knowledge this is the first combination of gameful learning and evaluation of peer review quality. ...
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Peer evaluation skills are not typically taught to students, yet they are expected to provide high-quality feedback to their peers. Gameful learning, a pedagogy supporting student-driven learning, can further reinforce the development of peer evaluation skills, if students are motivated to improve upon them. To better understand the effects of a peer evaluation training on the quality of student-generated peer evaluations, we scored peer evaluations from two cohorts taking a graduate-level nutritional sciences class using gameful learning pedagogy. The intervention group completed a peer evaluation training before engaging in peer reviews, while the control group did not. The training included two readings, a video, and reflection questions. The peer evaluations submitted by both the intervention and control groups were assessed on a validated rubric. The peer evaluation training had a positive effect on the quality of the submitted peer evaluations. The intervention group had a 10.8% higher score on its first submitted peer evaluation compared with controls (P = 0.003). The intervention group improved the quality of its future submissions by a further 8.9%, whereas the controls did not continue to improve substantially (P < 0.001). Overall, peer review training enhanced the quality of peer evaluations and allowed students to develop professional skills that they can utilize in any biomedical profession. Our results highlight the importance of peer evaluation training in combination with repeated practice and student-driven learning brought forth by gameful learning pedagogy in improving the quality of evaluations and developing professional skills.
... In considering game-based learning, we question what counts as disciplinary and authentic practices in the context of inservice and preservice teacher education and argue that participating in gameful activities and assessments creates a playful culture of learning. Gameful learning emphasizes goal-driven efforts to understand the rules or constraints and co-operate with other players to overcome obstacles as well as to negotiate their identities while achieving goals (Holden et al., 2014;McGonigal, 2011). An important and authentic practice in teacher education should include playful and gameful aspects of learning: teachers' practices involve young people who are apt learners in their social worlds, invent new ways of doing things, and examine their own practices, including their game play (Lankshear & Knobel, 2011;Thomas & Brown, 2011). ...
... However, promoting a gameful learning disposition might conflict with supporting a co-learning disposition. Gamefulness requires an attitude of accepting new rules and constraints of rule-based gaming (Holden et al., 2014), which often specifies the value of player actions (i.e., allocated points). The co-learner disposition of a teacher and students, on the other hand, would challenge those constraints and create the rules together. ...
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Innovative practice in a classroom adds challenges and tensions to programs and institutional structures in higher education. With the recent emphasis on curricula reform, there is a great focus on assessment and pedagogical practices to support student learning. To illustrate the tensions arising from these efforts, we present four pedagogical and assessment innovation approaches using both Shulman’s (2005) Signature Pedagogies and Tatar’s (2007) Design Tensions frameworks. The four approaches include problem-based learning, game-based learning, case-based learning, and technology-enhanced learning. A narrative for each approach examines and addresses tensions using Shulman’s (2005) surface, deep and implicit structures. We argue that there is an interconnected complexity and conflicting visions among the micro- (e.g., classroom or practicum), meso- (e.g., program), and macro- (e.g., institution) levels. We acknowledge that dynamic tensions continually exist and needs to be thoughtfully navigated in support of innovative assessment and pedagogies in higher education.
... (Holden, 2013, p. 5) Collaborative presence, in our experience, often includes listening attentively, identifying and mitigating bias, and honoring in-the-moment improvisations characteristic of game-based learning (e.g. Holden et al., 2014). Establishing collaborative presence is not the achieved win-state of a single game. ...
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This chapter examines the playful design and enactment of games for learning, and details generative and provocative attributes of playful multistakeholder partnerships for information and communications technology-supported game-based learning in international contexts. Drawing upon the experiences of two educational technology research and development groups, the chapter first identifies four design principles that have guided various global - and playful - game-based learning partnerships in Jamaica, Oman, South Africa, and Switzerland. Such international partnerships were designed as opportunities to co-construct game-based learning by articulating the permitted, establishing collaborative presence, attending carefully to trust, and fostering third space. The second half of this chapter features a case study of ICT-supported game-based learning in Oman, and describes different ways in which a playful multistakeholder partnership can be enacted in a cross-cultural setting. The subject of this case study is Place Out of Time (POOT), a trans-historical simulation of a trial in which students play guests who come from a range of places and time throughout history to discuss some of the great issues of humankind, and to bring the wisdom of history to a modern-day problem. Utilizing narrative methods, four vignettes from playing POOT in Oman are presented that convey the complex, and sometimes contradictory characteristics of playful partnerships for game-based learning in a developing region. The chapter concludes by arguing for a more critical playfulness in game-based learning that can support all partners and players in confronting biases, celebrating difference, and creatively addressing local and global needs.
... Game players usually make efforts to understand the rules or constraints of a game to accomplish its goal, seek to become a confident player or co-player, and examine their strategies (Kim, 2015;Holden et al., 2014). Researchers suggested that, when playing good games, players show gamefulness through 'lusory attitude' (Suits, 2005) toward unnecessary obstacles, identity exploration, and pursuit for improvement and progression (Holden et al, 2014;McGonigal, 2011McGonigal, , 2014. ...
... Game players usually make efforts to understand the rules or constraints of a game to accomplish its goal, seek to become a confident player or co-player, and examine their strategies (Kim, 2015;Holden et al., 2014). Researchers suggested that, when playing good games, players show gamefulness through 'lusory attitude' (Suits, 2005) toward unnecessary obstacles, identity exploration, and pursuit for improvement and progression (Holden et al, 2014;McGonigal, 2011McGonigal, , 2014. The gameful experience supports learners' cognitive, social, and emotional engagement in learning. ...
... Such game play requires them to identify their area of improvement and actively seek solutions toward their goals. In this process, they project and conceptualize multiple explicit and implicit social identities that are pertinent to the game as well as their social worlds beyond the game environment (Holden et al, 2014;McGonigal, 2011). The players' lusory attitude of addressing these challenges is socially stimulated, especially when seeking solutions within the collaborative game settings. ...
... The program attracted many teachers, like Tim, who were as interested in educational technologies and app development as they were in international partnerships and prosocial design thinking. 11 The collaborative trajectory he and I have crafted in the past few years extends from the early stages of classroom practitioner inquiry, when Tim first piloted game-based approaches to learning across subject areas, 12 to our examination of identity, ignorance, and "lusory attitudes" (see Suits) 13 in approaches to gameful learning, 14 to our ongoing involvement in the national Playful Learning movement. Much of what informs our partnership is evident in the narrative presented in this chapter: a pedagogical commitment to curiosity-driven learning, a desire to tinker (whether with media or our habits of mind), and a willingness to identify the qualities of our ignorance so as to more fully explore and engage our work as educators. ...
... 68, emphasis original). Further, scholars such as Holden et al. (2014) have argued that play is both engaging for students and teachers, while it also provides spaces for students to take chances, learn to improvise, and to be social with peers. Further, Moore (2013) describes how play around complex systems "like big-box retail development and transnational labor make the classroom a safe space for explorations of the inner-workings of big business rather than assuming that such workings are de facto oppressive and leaving it at that." ...
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Abstract: The theoretical justification for enactivist approaches to learning is just beginning to emerge, and remains largely theoretical. Enactivism conceptualized as play beings us closer to the heart of the question about how play-based social stud- ies might look. Recent research in simulations and games—forms of play—help to reveal some of the potential of the enacted domain. This paper attends to the (inter) subjective perspectives and lived experiences of two veteran middle school teach- ers who use play as a regularly occurring feature in their social studies teaching classes, which they co-construct and co-teach. Using a basic interpretive approach to research, this paper serves to highlight these perspectives and experiences as related by the participants in an effort to contextualize a highly theoretical approach to learning. Throughout this study, participants revealed their perceptions that the pedagogies of play are challenging but invaluable tools with which to approach social studies teaching. In doing so, this paper will help to illuminate some potential promises and pitfalls that an enactivist approach to social studies presents for the teachers. “Their definition of rigor is different than ours”: The promise and challenge of enactivist pedagogies in the social studies classroom. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/292676944_Their_definition_of_rigor_is_different_than_ours_The_promise_and_challenge_of_enactivist_pedagogies_in_the_social_studies_classroom [accessed Aug 16, 2016].
... As noted, POST Cards was designed through a partnership among the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Michigan, and Microsoft Research as a game-based approach to project development and professional learning (Holden, 2013;Holden et al., 2014). Unlike games played in higher education for discipline-specific coursework (e.g. ...
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Purpose This article illustrates through word, image and design the back-and-forth exchange characteristic of Project Oriented Semantic Trading (POST) Cards, a game-based professional learning ritual relevant to educators’ problems of practice. In describing the iterative designs and features of POST Cards, this article intentionally depicts alternative means of narrative and scholarship via imaginative, playful and visual (re)presentation. Design/methodology/approach Both POST Cards and this inquiry use a design-based process driven by theory about play, intended to improve education practice, and iteratively co-created with participants. As an annotated and dialogical worked example, this representation of game play moves beyond the monolithic medium of printed text. With the intention to provoke discussion about the content and configuration of inquiry, this article traces the literal and figurative tradeoffs associated with the development and play of POST Cards. Findings In surveying the design and enactment of POST Cards across two iterations, and a related Quote Cards mutation, three design principles are relevant to fostering greater playfulness in higher education: embrace the inevitability of tradeoffs, invite players to co-create new features and iterations, and create conditions whereby everyday rituals and social practices are transformed into improvisational and discursive play. Originality/value As an annotated narrative constructed in the form and spirit of POST Cards, this inquiry is notable for presenting an experimental form of multimodal literacy and also for revealing how higher education settings and practices may be designed as playgrounds upon which to render visionary, risky and expressive approaches to game-based collaboration and creative scholarship.
... In educational literature, agency often refers to individual students empowered as active learners within learning ecosystems (e.g., Holden et al., 2014). At other times agency is used to denote principled activism based on a moral stance to achieve social change (Campbell, Schwier, and Kenny, 2005;Schwier, 2004). ...
Preprint
The pandemic of Spring 2020 necessitated a rapid switch in teaching methods around the world. Most significantly was the revolutionary transition from face to face instruction to remote, distance, or virtual teaching/learning and the resultant online “new normal” that continues to ripple across the academy and society at large. This new reality has necessitated a paradigmatic shift in how scholars, teachers and administrators understand, create, employ, and assess teaching/learning. It has likewise resulted in a shift in how students, parents, families, and employers understand, value, desire, and prefer educational formats and settings. The authors point to the importance of considering aspects of theory, research, and best practices related to this transition. The article surveys resulting first response scholarship and forecast types of questions that loom large regarding the practice of online teaching in the new economic, academic, social framework.
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Innovative learning strategies are constantly developed to increase student engagement and application of course content to improve learning outcomes. Gameful Learning pedagogy is one such strategy that builds students’ intrinsic motivation, confidence, and engagement to course material by allowing them to choose from a menu of optional assignments to earn points toward a grade. Little is known about student perceptions and outcomes from applying this pedagogy to dietetics and nutritional sciences graduate-level curricula. This article describes the implementation of Gameful Learning to an Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics–accredited nutritional sciences graduate degree course and evaluates student perceptions and outcomes. Two student cohorts from 2016 (pre–Gameful Learning) and 2017 (implementation of Gameful Learning) who were enrolled in a nutritional sciences graduate-level course were compared. Student teaching evaluations were compared across cohorts. Specific items measuring student perceptions of fairness, knowledge gained, and workload were analyzed. Mann–Whitney nonparametric tests compared groups and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient measured associations. There was a positive correlation between total points and optional points (Pearson’s r = 0.513, p = .0001). There was an overall increased perception toward the excellence of the course (3.82 to 4.13; 5-point Likert-type scale), improved sense of fairness (3.79 to 4.17; p = .036), and increased perception of workload (2.35 to 2.20; where 1 student indicated more work and 5 indicated less work). Although challenges in workload exist, Gameful Learning strategies aid in improving student outcomes and perceptions of course material by facilitating student autonomy and engagement with course content.