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Statistical results for Bayesian mixed repeated measures ANOVAs on reconstruction accuracies for three-tone to six-tone sequences

Statistical results for Bayesian mixed repeated measures ANOVAs on reconstruction accuracies for three-tone to six-tone sequences

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Recent studies suggest that the mechanisms involved in the short-term retention of serial order information may be shared across short-term memory (STM) domains such as verbal and visuospatial STM. Given the intrinsic sequential organization of musical material, the study of STM for musical information may be particularly informative about serial o...

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... same type of analyses considering response accuracy as a function of serial position was conducted for the musical serial order reconstruction task. As shown in Table 2, for three-tone and four-tone sequences, the model associated with largest evidence, relative to the null model, was the model containing only the effect of participant group. As shown in Figure 4A and 4B, the response curves were flat, probably due to the limited number of items that were presented for these list length (see also Smyth et al., 2005, for similar results for a three-item visuospatial serial order reconstruction task). ...
Context 2
... five-tone and six-tone sequences, recency effects were observed, as shown in Figure 4C and 4D. For both list lengths, the model receiving the strongest evidence was the model including both serial position and group effects (see Table 2). The presence of a serial position effect was supported by an analysis of specific effects providing moderate and decisive evidence for the effect of serial position in five-tone (BFInclusion = 3.17) and 6-six-tone sequences (BFInclusion = 220.56), ...

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