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Start page for the course. (Edited screenshot by Karin Bolldén. Permission to use screenshot granted by itslearning©)

Start page for the course. (Edited screenshot by Karin Bolldén. Permission to use screenshot granted by itslearning©)

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Thesis
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The aim of this study was to describe and analyse online teaching practices in the Swedish higher education context. The study had an online ethnographic approach and was based on empirical data on the teaching in two university courses. The study rested primarily on observational data but interviews and available documents also formed the basis fo...

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Context 1
... menu containing the courses the user is involved in is shown on the left-hand side. The menu can be expanded, showing each course's content in a tree structure that can be further expanded (see Figure 2). A central function of the platform is the discussion forums. ...

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... In doing so, I attempt to come to grips with the changes that are concomitant of the digitalization of the school in the Global North. In this context, this work argues for the need to focus a lens on teaching as a sociomaterial practice (Bolldén, 2015;Fenwick, Edwards, & Sawchuk, 2011;Landri, 2015;Sörensen, 2009). The argument is built mainly on the following observation: that the dynamic and types of teaching practices that emerge with the use of digital technologies configure and shape learning, and, ultimately, ensure the formation of school knowledge in the digital age. ...
Chapter
This volume invites the reader to explore the complexities and the dynamic character of interacting with technologies that unfold in the everyday flow of practices in schools, museums, field trips, and the home. In particular, we paid attention to the material conditions of such practices via, for instance, the exploration of media discourses on information and communication technologies in the classroom; the ongoing digitization of the school; the use of video chat for language learning; the instantiation of CrossActionSpaces in urban science classrooms; the development of symbolic technologies such as the Carbon Footprint Calculator; the design of apps and virtual museums for learning science; the use of text message tools for collaborative learning in teacher education and the design, implementation, and evaluation of Augmented Reality (AR) apps in outdoor learning. As a result, this volume brings together inspirational and high-quality chapters that raise a range of important ideas and showcase the importance of looking beyond technology-enhanced learning. Five take-away messages are presented at the end of this chapter. They summarize how the chapters included in this volume contribute to understanding everyday practice and materiality as constitutive of human cognition, agency, educational values and creative critique. Taken together they call for complementary views of research on technologies in education and invite scholars in the field to reimagine studies about learning and teaching in the digital age.
... In doing so, I attempt to come to grips with the changes that are concomitant of the digitalization of the school in the Global North. In this context, this work argues for the need to focus a lens on teaching as a sociomaterial practice (Bolldén, 2015;Fenwick, Edwards, & Sawchuk, 2011;Landri, 2015;Sörensen, 2009). The argument is built mainly on the following observation: that the dynamic and types of teaching practices that emerge with the use of digital technologies configure and shape learning, and, ultimately, ensure the formation of school knowledge in the digital age. ...
Chapter
This chapter adds the view on the implications for deep learning that I see when taking a practice lens on the material conditions of learning and teaching with technologies. Grounded in Jonassen’s work on computers in the classroom, I develop the central place for unpacking the daily practice of learning with technology that spans the Learning Sciences and Educational Technology arenas. Learning with technology differs from learning about and from technologies. The term of teaching and learning with technologies has been shaped by David Jonassen many years ago. However, it is still relevant today, as it is shown in this chapter through the implications that it brings for the work of teachers, practitioners, schools, and researchers. Moreover, by using the approach of crossactionspaces, I provide an alternative view to the concept of teachers as workplace learners—the Teacher’s Zone of Proximal Development (T-ZPD).
... In doing so, I attempt to come to grips with the changes that are concomitant of the digitalization of the school in the Global North. In this context, this work argues for the need to focus a lens on teaching as a sociomaterial practice (Bolldén, 2015;Fenwick, Edwards, & Sawchuk, 2011;Landri, 2015;Sörensen, 2009). The argument is built mainly on the following observation: that the dynamic and types of teaching practices that emerge with the use of digital technologies configure and shape learning, and, ultimately, ensure the formation of school knowledge in the digital age. ...
Book
This book explores the complexities of interacting with digital technologies in the everyday flow of practices in schools, museums, and the home. In particular, the authors pay attention to the material conditions of such practices via the exploration of media discourses on information and communication technologies in the classroom; the ongoing digitization of the school; the use of video chat for language learning; the instantiation of CrossActionSpaces in an urban science classrooms; the development of symbolic technologies such as the Carbon Footprint Calculator; the design of apps and virtual museums for learning science; the use of text message tools for collaborative learning in teacher education and the design, implementation, and evaluation of Augmented Reality apps in outdoor learning. The book is grounded in case studies presented by scholars at the workshop, “Changing Teaching and Learning Practices in Schools with Tablet-Mediated Collaborative Learning: Nordic, European and International Views” and the workshop “Emergent Practices and Material Conditions in Tablet-mediated Collaborative Learning and Teaching” both of which have been held at the Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning conference (CSCL). This volume brings together inspirational and high-quality chapters that raise a range of important ideas and showcase the importance of looking beyond technology-enhanced learning. Taken together, this volume unpacks a variety of everyday situations by engaging with what is really happening with digital technologies rather than what is expected to happen with them in educational settings. The take-away message is a call for research on learning, teaching, and digital technologies that enables engagement with the materiality of educational practices and, in particular, their constitutive relationships that configure the contemporary educational practices of the digital age.
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The doctoral thesis addresses student teachers and beginning teachers experiences of emotionally challenging situations. The research questions focus: What types of situations do student teachers and beginning teachers describe as emotionally challenging? How do student teachers and beginning teachers cope with the emotionally challenges described? The thesis consists of four papers that address these research questions. The findings show that (1) student teachers' coping consists of a postponing strategy that emphasized not being able to learn coping strategies until starting to work and (2) acceptance of not being able to change situations that were perceived as emotionally challenging. Other strategies student teachers utilised involved change advocacy, collective sharing and responsibility reduction as ways of coping with emotional challenge. Other findings from included studies discussed establishing boundaries in relation to emotional labour and in relationship maintenance as a coping strategy. The beginning teachers had to but cope with conflicts starting to teach. The beginning teachers coped with conflicts through using strategies of autonomy, collaboration, influencing or conformity. These strategies had different consequences, using an autonomy and influencing strategy seemed to result in thoughts about changing workplace and/or attrition from the teacher profession.
Chapter
What changes when digital technology is used in the classroom, and how do we identify these changes? These questions motivated the present study, which sought to contribute to the discourse on the digitalization of schools from the perspective of teachers’ everyday practice. The analysis was grounded in the scrutiny of 11 semi-structured interviews and field notes stemming from ethnographic observations carried out in classrooms, breaks, and teachers’ workshops. The data were analyzed in terms of materials, competences, meanings, and experiential qualities (i.e., referring to how certain properties of a digital design are experienced in use). The experiential qualities that emerged from the analysis of the data show an interrelation between the elements of practice; in particular, they reflect a visible, problem-solving and adaptive teaching practice that develops with the use of digital technologies in the classroom. Such a practice is characterized as effective, evidence-based, and liberated from time and space communication. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to, the emergence of the teachers’ practice of experimenting with the digital materials, and the emergence of a managerial communication practice in the elementary school. The chapter contributes to the discussion of the tensions between incremental and radical changes in teaching with digital technologies and offers an elaboration of the relevance of a lens on practice in studies about technology and education.
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Thesis
Depression is the most burdensome disorder worldwide in terms of health loss. The potential of internet and technologies to scale up psychological treatment resources is substantial. A blended treatment approach, reducing therapist time and combining sessions with online self-help components, could enhance availability of psychological treatment, while maintaining and possibly enhancing effect of treatment. The aim of this thesis was to develop and investigate the blended treatment approach, in terms of acceptance among key stakeholders, and clinical effect in treatment of depression in the adult and adolescent population. Study I investigated acceptance of the blended treatment approach among mental health care stakeholders by means of a European survey. The results demonstrated that the majority readily accepted blended treatment for management of mild and moderate depression. Study II evaluated blended treatment compared to standard face-toface psychotherapy in treatment of adult depression in a controlled non-inferiority trial. The results showed a similar decrease in depression from both interventions at post-treatment, with decreased levels maintained over six months. Non-inferiority for the blended treatment could not be statistically established. Study III was a controlled non-inferiority trial evaluating blended treatment compared to treatment as usual. The results indicated superiority for the blended treatment at post-treatment and partly at six months. After twelve months the outcomes in the two conditions were similar. Study IV evaluated blended treatment for adolescent depression in a controlled superiority trial, where the therapist time was not reduced, but sessions delivered via chat for improved reach and efficiency. Compared to attention control, the blended treatment significantly reduced depression symptoms, with effects indicated to be maintained over six months. Study V was a controlled superiority trial, evaluating an improved version of the blended treatment used in Study IV to similar methods and in a similar population. In comparison to minimal attention control, the blended treatment significantly reduced depression symptoms at post-treatment, corresponding to a large treatment effect. Across Study II to V, estimates indicated that the amount of therapist time that could be saved in blended treatment, compared to standard psychological treatment, was around 40%. In conclusion, a gradual, blended integration of technology into psychological treatment i) performed well in treatment of adult and adolescent populations, ii) could substantially reduce therapist time in comparison to standard face-to-face psychological treatment, and iii) was accepted by patients as well as other mental health care stakeholders. The thesis demonstrates the potentials of technology-assisted blended treatment models to deliver treatment of depression in the young and adult population in accordance with the current, urgent need to increase availability of psychological treatment as well as increase acceptance of technology-assisted mental health interventions.
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Thesis
Against the backdrop of the transformations in the entire framing of professional work, social work has come under close scrutiny in many countries, including Sweden. Doubts have been raised about practitioners’ existing know­ ledge base, and the importance of practitioners engaging in learning and the renewal and extension of professional capacities has been emphasized. The present thesis concerns knowledge use and learning in the daily practices of child investigation work. The aim is to explore processes of knowledge use and learning in practice. The study is based on a mix of qualitative approaches, basic­ ally from ethnography, comprising methods such as participant observations, interviews, reflective dialogues and documentary analysis of case data. The main findings demonstrate that investigation work is characterized mainly by the use of practice­based knowledge. Research­based knowledge is predominantly used as a means of explaining a client’s situation or to underpin and legitimize one’s own beliefs and decisions made on other grounds. Profes­ sional learning is largely adaptive in character, as the social workers learn to handle tasks in a fairly routinized way on the basis of rules or procedures that draw on existing knowledge in the practice setting. Two conclusions are drawn: First, the use of knowledge in child investigation work bears little resemblance to principles of evidence­based practice. Second, the reproduction of professional knowledge is largely implicit and taken for granted. The study offers insight into the much­discussed topic of putting knowledge into practice, which is of importance to strategies for organizing professional learning and knowledgeable practice.