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1 Sport categories with the most plausible measurement system categories. A division is made between team sports (more than three players), and individual sports. Team sports primarily involve large measurement volumes and occlusions. Since team sports are mainly concerned with tracking, the accuracy is less important than for individual sports, where technique factors are commonly analysed. The individual sports are apart from indoor vs outdoor, also divided into larger and smaller volume sports. Smaller volumes are covered by the highly accurate optoelectronic measurement systems. The individual sports in larger volumes are currently the most critical in terms of measuring kinematics. The most suitable options are IMS and IMU (fusion) systems. Gymnastics HB = High Bar, Gymnastics F = Floor, Track and Field R = Rink, Track and Field D = Discus; 

1 Sport categories with the most plausible measurement system categories. A division is made between team sports (more than three players), and individual sports. Team sports primarily involve large measurement volumes and occlusions. Since team sports are mainly concerned with tracking, the accuracy is less important than for individual sports, where technique factors are commonly analysed. The individual sports are apart from indoor vs outdoor, also divided into larger and smaller volume sports. Smaller volumes are covered by the highly accurate optoelectronic measurement systems. The individual sports in larger volumes are currently the most critical in terms of measuring kinematics. The most suitable options are IMS and IMU (fusion) systems. Gymnastics HB = High Bar, Gymnastics F = Floor, Track and Field R = Rink, Track and Field D = Discus; 

Contexts in source publication

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... results are processed in the online, interactive selection tool. In Figure 2.2, the accuracies are plotted against the range of the experimental setup. As expected, the accuracy of the systems (eq. ...
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... the reported statistical values (column 8)) did not permit the estimation of the P95 , this is indicated as a comment in column 11. Note that the maximum range in the peer-reviewed articles is not the maximum capture volumes of a system (for this see the general table (table 1) Figure 2.2 A) Chart on range versus accuracy as reported in peer-reviewed papers (see Table 2). ...
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... optoelectronic measurement systems (OMS) are more accurate than the other systems (see Figure 2.1). Not surprisingly, the optical systems (e.g. ...
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... systems use markers that reflect light back to the sensor. The Vicon systems (460, T-40, MX13 and MX40) in the chart (Figure 2.1) are examples of passive motion capture systems. ...
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... systems (EMS) find the unknown positions of the measurement transponders by means of time-of-flight of the electromagnetic waves -radio waves -travelling from the transponder to the base stations (Stelzer, 2004). EMS provide large capture volumes (see Figure 2.1), but are less accurate than OMS: each EMS in the chart has a lower accuracy than the worst performing optoelectronic system. ...
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... the directionality of ultrasound can be a disadvantage when working with dynamic measurements. In the chart (Figure 2.2), one system is included, which is based on ultrasonic localization in sports, with an accuracy of 0.05 m in an area of 9 m 2 (Bischoff, Heidmann, Rust, & Paul, 2012). Note, however, that this result was obtained via a fusion with a radio frequency transceiver. ...
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... the right motion capture system for sport experiments can be difficult. Figure 2.2 is designed to support researchers in this choice. The selection procedure is explained in the caption of Figure 2.2, and also available online via an interactive selection tool. ...
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... 2.2 is designed to support researchers in this choice. The selection procedure is explained in the caption of Figure 2.2, and also available online via an interactive selection tool. Based on the results of this survey, we defined some broad sport categories, which require roughly the same characteristics in a measurement system (Figure 2.1). ...
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... selection procedure is explained in the caption of Figure 2.2, and also available online via an interactive selection tool. Based on the results of this survey, we defined some broad sport categories, which require roughly the same characteristics in a measurement system (Figure 2.1). A division is made between team sports and individual sports. ...
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... most suitable options are IMS and IMU (fusion) systems, however these measurement categories often require development of a suitable algorithm (either for tracking in case of IMS, or fusion filtering in case of IMU). Therefore, overall we can conclude that there is a gap in measurement system supply for capturing large volumes at high accuracy (Figure 2.2). These specifications are mainly necessary for large volume individual sports, both indoor (among others swimming, speed skating, gymnastics), and outdoor (among others rowing, tennis, track and field). ...
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... mean, RMSE), range/volume, and accuracy). Furthermore, we invite researchers to add to the here presented chart (Figure 2.2) and system overview online. ...

Citations

... The role of sport and its linkage with the element of digitalization is very clear, providing a positive color and relationship to the development of sports, both in achievement sports and educational sports, to support the main goals of sports and education. Previously, it was also important to give an accuracy test to improve the robustness of the database [17], [18]. In addition, to support the consistency of the system, it is also necessary to pay attention to several main things or components including materials and so on. ...
... Among them, 1 F is the tendon force, that is, the output force of muscle, m F is the contraction force of skeletal muscle, F is the resultant force of muscle abdomen, and  is the pinnate angle. The total muscle strength of skeletal muscle is the sum of passive force of elastic element and active force of contractile element. ...
... After deformation, the following results can be obtained. 1 cos ...
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... The results underline the importance for setting a standard for future studies and reporting on both procedures to allow for comparison of studies -also when these methods are embedded in a software. This applies not just for speed skating, but also to other studies, where motion capturing in large volumes is involved (van der Kruk & Reijne, 2017). ...
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