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Spacing Effect. Adapted from Ebbinghaus, 1885.

Spacing Effect. Adapted from Ebbinghaus, 1885.

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The paper describes active learning strategies used in undergraduate college algebra and business calculus courses. There are a variety of active learning strategies described in the literature. We wanted to implement a few that together, satisfy the key characteristics of active learning strategies. The active learning strategies described in this paper are, interactive presentation style, group-work with discussion and feedback, volunteer presentations of solutions by groups, raise students’ learning interest towards specific topics, involve students in mathematical explorations, experiments, and projects, and last but not least, continuous motivation and engagement of students. We analyse the relationship between the average results of 27 college algebra and business calculus sections and the effects of the level of use of these active learning strategies. We demonstrate that the application of these strategies has a positive effect on the average results of the sections and the passing rates of the students.