Figure 15- uploaded by Harald Lübke
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Sources of imported finds on sites of the final Mesolithic on the southern Baltic coast. 1. Fragment of Linienbandkeramik pottery probably from the Rhineland (site: Parow). 2. Axe of Wiedaer Schiefer (sites: Travenbrück and Wangels). 3. Adzes of 'Danubian type' (sites: Rosenhof, 2x Neustadt, Prohn, Parow and Lietzow-Buddelin). 4. Fragment of Stichbandkeramik pottery (site: Lietzow-Buddelin). 5. Decorated bone plate (site: RalswiekAugustenhof). No scale for finds.

Sources of imported finds on sites of the final Mesolithic on the southern Baltic coast. 1. Fragment of Linienbandkeramik pottery probably from the Rhineland (site: Parow). 2. Axe of Wiedaer Schiefer (sites: Travenbrück and Wangels). 3. Adzes of 'Danubian type' (sites: Rosenhof, 2x Neustadt, Prohn, Parow and Lietzow-Buddelin). 4. Fragment of Stichbandkeramik pottery (site: Lietzow-Buddelin). 5. Decorated bone plate (site: RalswiekAugustenhof). No scale for finds.

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The border between the Mesolithic and the Neolithic in Central Europe is traditionally defined on the basis of subsistence strategy. It is the development from hunter-gatherer groups in the forests of the early Holocene to the first farmers. The debate on the character of this process has been going on now for over a hundred years. Here we present...

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